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Thread: Charles Dickens' Links to Liverpool

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Default Charles Dickens' Links to Liverpool

    Charles Dickens

    1812/1870 Colin's Bridewell, Campbell Street, off Duke Street, Liverpool L1

    He was born in Landport and moved with the family to London. At the age of 12 years old he was put to work in a blanking factory to assist the family income as his father was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for debt.

    Next, from 1824 until 1827 Dickens studied at Wellington House Academy, London. From 1827 to 1828 he was a law office clerk, and then worked as a shorthand reporter at Doctor's Commons. In the 1840s Dickens founded Master Humphrey's Cloak and edited the London Daily News. Dickens's relationship with Maria Beadnell, the daughter of a banker, lasted for four years. Afterwards, he married the daughter of his friend George Hogarth, Catherine Hogart in 1836.

    When Catherine's sisters, Georgiana, moved in with the Dickenses, he fell in love with her. Even though, Dickens had 10 children with Catherine, they were separated in 1858. Additionally, Dickens also had a long-lasting relation with the actress Ellen Ternan, whom he had met by the late 1850s.

    From the 1840s Dickens spent much time traveling and campaigning against many of the social evils of his time. In addition he gave talks and reading, wrote pamphlets, plays, and letters. In 1844 to 1845 he lived in Italy, Switzerland and Paris. From 1858 to 1868, he gave lecturing tours in Britain and the United States. Afterwards, he moved to Gadshill Place, near Rochester, Kent. He died there on June 9, 1870.

    Charles Dickens made numerous visits to Liverpool, specially from 1842/1869 when he read extracts from his novels often to large audiences in St. George's Hall and at former Masque Theatre in Duke Street. He salied to America from Liverpool on at least two occasions in 1860 was sworn in as a special constable in the Liverpool Police Force to aid his research in writing The Uncommercial Traveller. The time spent in Liverpool must have been very dear to him for he wrote Liverpool lies in my heart next only to London.

    Maybe, he was not born in Liverpool and never lived here, but he spent part of his time in Pool in. I am thinking that he was a important person here with his books, his culture, and his audiences in St. George Hall and Masque Theatre.

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  2. #2
    PhilipG
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    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?
    I am reading a book called PLAQUE BY PLAQUE, of John B. Fidler. Lets me somes minutes and I am looking for more info.

  4. #4
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    I am reading a book called PLAQUE BY PLAQUE, of John B. Fidler. Lets me somes minutes and I am looking for more info.
    I've just found this, Marie.
    http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache...&ct=clnk&cd=25

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?
    Only I can found it in google, I am sorry.

    Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable.

  6. #6
    PhilipG
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    90 Seel Street (the site of the Masque) was a Police Station in the 1930s.

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    90 Seel Street (the site of the Masque) was a Police Station in the 1930s.
    But Dickens died in 1870. Does the Police Station built in 1930?

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    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    Only I can found it in google, I am sorry.

    Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable.
    Thank you.
    Here's a photo of it in 1992.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44435674@N00/379105003/

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    Thank you.
    Here's a photo of it in 1992.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44435674@N00/379105003/
    Thanx. Dickens is very famous out England. When I went to Secundary School, I was read a lot of books of him, for example, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, ... Plaque by Plaque its a good book coz u can find all famous people who born, died or lived in Pool someday. Now I like to go out, to walk, I come back later and i like looking for more info about Dickens n Pool. Thanx again!!

  10. #10
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    But Dickens died in 1870. Does the Police Station built in 1930?
    I don't know when it was built, but it was a police station in 1936, and might have been a police station when Dickens was said to have given a reading there.
    Perhaps it was called the Masque quite recently because of its connection with Dickens.
    I'm not an expert on Charles Dickens, but I do know there never was a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

  11. #11
    MarkA
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    Page 3 of the following link...http://www.liverpool.gov.uk/Images/tcm21-32267.pdf...shows that the station Dickens served as a policeman was at the junction of Argyle Street/York Street/Lydia Ann Street.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    Charles Dickens

    1812/1870 Colin's Bridewell, Campbell Street, off Duke Street, Liverpool L1

    He was born in Landport and moved with the family to London. At the age of 12 years old he was put to work in a blanking factory to assist the family income as his father was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for debt.

    Next, from 1824 until 1827 Dickens studied at Wellington House Academy, London. From 1827 to 1828 he was a law office clerk, and then worked as a shorthand reporter at Doctor's Commons. In the 1840s Dickens founded Master Humphrey's Cloak and edited the London Daily News. Dickens's relationship with Maria Beadnell, the daughter of a banker, lasted for four years. Afterwards, he married the daughter of his friend George Hogarth, Catherine Hogart in 1836.

    When Catherine's sisters, Georgiana, moved in with the Dickenses, he fell in love with her. Even though, Dickens had 10 children with Catherine, they were separated in 1858. Additionally, Dickens also had a long-lasting relation with the actress Ellen Ternan, whom he had met by the late 1850s.

    From the 1840s Dickens spent much time traveling and campaigning against many of the social evils of his time. In addition he gave talks and reading, wrote pamphlets, plays, and letters. In 1844 to 1845 he lived in Italy, Switzerland and Paris. From 1858 to 1868, he gave lecturing tours in Britain and the United States. Afterwards, he moved to Gadshill Place, near Rochester, Kent. He died there on June 9, 1870.

    Charles Dickens made numerous visits to Liverpool, specially from 1842/1869 when he read extracts from his novels often to large audiences in St. George's Hall and at former Masque Theatre in Duke Street. He salied to America from Liverpool on at least two occasions in 1860 was sworn in as a special constable in the Liverpool Police Force to aid his research in writing The Uncommercial Traveller. The time spent in Liverpool must have been very dear to him for he wrote Liverpool lies in my heart next only to London.

    Maybe, he was not born in Liverpool and never lived here, but he spent part of his time in Pool in. I am thinking that he was a important person here with his books, his culture, and his audiences in St. George's Hall and Masque Theatre.
    Hi Marie

    No doubt Charles Dickens passed through Liverpool on numerous occasions in regard to his transatlantic travel and appearances on the lecture circuit. In fact, Liverpool undoubtedly was a major venue for him to make money as a lecturer. I am not totally certain of your statement that Liverpool was second only to London for him in terms of importance, because a number of British cities would have provided him with significant income as a lecturer which supplemented what he earned from the serialization of his novels and publisher royalties from his books. I am not sure what you are saying about "Colin's Bridewell" -- are you saying he was in prison there or lectured there?

    All my best

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Walden
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Hi Marie

    No doubt Charles Dickens passed through Liverpool on numerous occasions in regard to his transatlantic travel and appearances on the lecture circuit. In fact, Liverpool undoubtedly was a major venue for him to make money as a lecturer. I am not totally certain of your statement that Liverpool was second only to London for him in terms of importance, because a number of British cities would have provided him with significant income as a lecturer which supplemented what he earned from the serialization of his novels and publisher royalties from his books. I am not sure what you are saying about "Colin's Bridewell" -- are you saying he was in prison there or lectured there?

    All my best

    Chris
    He was a special constable in what is now Colin's Bridewell here

    "...Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable."

    Source

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walden View Post
    He was a special constable in what is now Colin's Bridewell here

    "...Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable."

    Source
    Yes, okay, thanks for that valuable information. But is Colin's Bridewell the present-day name of the place or is that what it was called in Dickens' time? I assume the former is the case.

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Editor, Loch Raven Review
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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Yes, okay, thanks for that valuable information. But is Colin's Bridewell the present-day name of the place or is that what it was called in Dickens' time? I assume the former is the case.

    Chris
    I am sorry but I have not got more info. Just read it on the morning, in a book called Plaque by plaque, and only r few words about he. I try to find more info in google.

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