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Thread: Charles Dickens' Links to Liverpool

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Default Charles Dickens' Links to Liverpool

    Charles Dickens

    1812/1870 Colin's Bridewell, Campbell Street, off Duke Street, Liverpool L1

    He was born in Landport and moved with the family to London. At the age of 12 years old he was put to work in a blanking factory to assist the family income as his father was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for debt.


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    Next, from 1824 until 1827 Dickens studied at Wellington House Academy, London. From 1827 to 1828 he was a law office clerk, and then worked as a shorthand reporter at Doctor's Commons. In the 1840s Dickens founded Master Humphrey's Cloak and edited the London Daily News. Dickens's relationship with Maria Beadnell, the daughter of a banker, lasted for four years. Afterwards, he married the daughter of his friend George Hogarth, Catherine Hogart in 1836.

    When Catherine's sisters, Georgiana, moved in with the Dickenses, he fell in love with her. Even though, Dickens had 10 children with Catherine, they were separated in 1858. Additionally, Dickens also had a long-lasting relation with the actress Ellen Ternan, whom he had met by the late 1850s.

    From the 1840s Dickens spent much time traveling and campaigning against many of the social evils of his time. In addition he gave talks and reading, wrote pamphlets, plays, and letters. In 1844 to 1845 he lived in Italy, Switzerland and Paris. From 1858 to 1868, he gave lecturing tours in Britain and the United States. Afterwards, he moved to Gadshill Place, near Rochester, Kent. He died there on June 9, 1870.

    Charles Dickens made numerous visits to Liverpool, specially from 1842/1869 when he read extracts from his novels often to large audiences in St. George's Hall and at former Masque Theatre in Duke Street. He salied to America from Liverpool on at least two occasions in 1860 was sworn in as a special constable in the Liverpool Police Force to aid his research in writing The Uncommercial Traveller. The time spent in Liverpool must have been very dear to him for he wrote Liverpool lies in my heart next only to London.

    Maybe, he was not born in Liverpool and never lived here, but he spent part of his time in Pool in. I am thinking that he was a important person here with his books, his culture, and his audiences in St. George Hall and Masque Theatre.

  2. #2
    PhilipG
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    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?
    I am reading a book called PLAQUE BY PLAQUE, of John B. Fidler. Lets me somes minutes and I am looking for more info.

  4. #4
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    I am reading a book called PLAQUE BY PLAQUE, of John B. Fidler. Lets me somes minutes and I am looking for more info.
    I've just found this, Marie.
    http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache...&ct=clnk&cd=25

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    There wasn't a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

    I'm interested in the reference to Colin's Bridewell.
    Is there a connection with the Bridewell and Charles Dickens?
    Only I can found it in google, I am sorry.

    Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable.

  6. #6
    PhilipG
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    90 Seel Street (the site of the Masque) was a Police Station in the 1930s.

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    90 Seel Street (the site of the Masque) was a Police Station in the 1930s.
    But Dickens died in 1870. Does the Police Station built in 1930?

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    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    Only I can found it in google, I am sorry.

    Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable.
    Thank you.
    Here's a photo of it in 1992.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44435674@N00/379105003/

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    Thank you.
    Here's a photo of it in 1992.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44435674@N00/379105003/
    Thanx. Dickens is very famous out England. When I went to Secundary School, I was read a lot of books of him, for example, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, ... Plaque by Plaque its a good book coz u can find all famous people who born, died or lived in Pool someday. Now I like to go out, to walk, I come back later and i like looking for more info about Dickens n Pool. Thanx again!!

  10. #10
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    But Dickens died in 1870. Does the Police Station built in 1930?
    I don't know when it was built, but it was a police station in 1936, and might have been a police station when Dickens was said to have given a reading there.
    Perhaps it was called the Masque quite recently because of its connection with Dickens.
    I'm not an expert on Charles Dickens, but I do know there never was a Masque Theatre in Liverpool.

  11. #11
    MarkA
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    Page 3 of the following link...http://www.liverpool.gov.uk/Images/tcm21-32267.pdf...shows that the station Dickens served as a policeman was at the junction of Argyle Street/York Street/Lydia Ann Street.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marie View Post
    Charles Dickens

    1812/1870 Colin's Bridewell, Campbell Street, off Duke Street, Liverpool L1

    He was born in Landport and moved with the family to London. At the age of 12 years old he was put to work in a blanking factory to assist the family income as his father was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for debt.

    Next, from 1824 until 1827 Dickens studied at Wellington House Academy, London. From 1827 to 1828 he was a law office clerk, and then worked as a shorthand reporter at Doctor's Commons. In the 1840s Dickens founded Master Humphrey's Cloak and edited the London Daily News. Dickens's relationship with Maria Beadnell, the daughter of a banker, lasted for four years. Afterwards, he married the daughter of his friend George Hogarth, Catherine Hogart in 1836.

    When Catherine's sisters, Georgiana, moved in with the Dickenses, he fell in love with her. Even though, Dickens had 10 children with Catherine, they were separated in 1858. Additionally, Dickens also had a long-lasting relation with the actress Ellen Ternan, whom he had met by the late 1850s.

    From the 1840s Dickens spent much time traveling and campaigning against many of the social evils of his time. In addition he gave talks and reading, wrote pamphlets, plays, and letters. In 1844 to 1845 he lived in Italy, Switzerland and Paris. From 1858 to 1868, he gave lecturing tours in Britain and the United States. Afterwards, he moved to Gadshill Place, near Rochester, Kent. He died there on June 9, 1870.

    Charles Dickens made numerous visits to Liverpool, specially from 1842/1869 when he read extracts from his novels often to large audiences in St. George's Hall and at former Masque Theatre in Duke Street. He salied to America from Liverpool on at least two occasions in 1860 was sworn in as a special constable in the Liverpool Police Force to aid his research in writing The Uncommercial Traveller. The time spent in Liverpool must have been very dear to him for he wrote Liverpool lies in my heart next only to London.

    Maybe, he was not born in Liverpool and never lived here, but he spent part of his time in Pool in. I am thinking that he was a important person here with his books, his culture, and his audiences in St. George's Hall and Masque Theatre.
    Hi Marie

    No doubt Charles Dickens passed through Liverpool on numerous occasions in regard to his transatlantic travel and appearances on the lecture circuit. In fact, Liverpool undoubtedly was a major venue for him to make money as a lecturer. I am not totally certain of your statement that Liverpool was second only to London for him in terms of importance, because a number of British cities would have provided him with significant income as a lecturer which supplemented what he earned from the serialization of his novels and publisher royalties from his books. I am not sure what you are saying about "Colin's Bridewell" -- are you saying he was in prison there or lectured there?

    All my best

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Walden
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Hi Marie

    No doubt Charles Dickens passed through Liverpool on numerous occasions in regard to his transatlantic travel and appearances on the lecture circuit. In fact, Liverpool undoubtedly was a major venue for him to make money as a lecturer. I am not totally certain of your statement that Liverpool was second only to London for him in terms of importance, because a number of British cities would have provided him with significant income as a lecturer which supplemented what he earned from the serialization of his novels and publisher royalties from his books. I am not sure what you are saying about "Colin's Bridewell" -- are you saying he was in prison there or lectured there?

    All my best

    Chris
    He was a special constable in what is now Colin's Bridewell here

    "...Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable."

    Source

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walden View Post
    He was a special constable in what is now Colin's Bridewell here

    "...Colin's Bridewell is a former Victorian police station where Charles Dickens was once a Special Constable."

    Source
    Yes, okay, thanks for that valuable information. But is Colin's Bridewell the present-day name of the place or is that what it was called in Dickens' time? I assume the former is the case.

    Chris
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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Yes, okay, thanks for that valuable information. But is Colin's Bridewell the present-day name of the place or is that what it was called in Dickens' time? I assume the former is the case.

    Chris
    I am sorry but I have not got more info. Just read it on the morning, in a book called Plaque by plaque, and only r few words about he. I try to find more info in google.

  16. #16
    Walden
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Yes, okay, thanks for that valuable information. But is Colin's Bridewell the present-day name of the place or is that what it was called in Dickens' time? I assume the former is the case.

    Chris
    Hi I found this "the man behind this vision of down-to-earth gastronomy is none other than film and TV producer Colin McKeown (early Brookside, Liverpool One, Liam, Nice Guy Eddie)." Source

    And this

    "The Bridewell (Argyle/Campbell Street)

    1861

    Grade II

    Located within the midst of the warehouses in the Duke Street area, the Bridewell, or Police Station, dates from c.1850. Although the Old Dock constructed nearby was redundant by this time, the Bridewell was constructed near the new docks and near the main lodging areas for the sailors. It is of brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. The building is of two storeys and three bays, with the centre bay projecting to form the base of a short tower. The ground floor windows have stone lintols, and all windows are vertically sliding sashes with glazing bars. The entrance has a rusticated architrave with a lion's head to the keystone and a stone plaque above. The roof is hipped, with that to the tower having a finial. A later ventilation tower to the rear was constructed to vent the ground floor cells, which are windowless and reached through an iron door. Closely surrounding the building is a wall of brick, approximately 12 feet in height with a rounded stone coping. The bevelled corner is surmounted by an iron lamp-holder above a plain doorway." Source

    No mention of a name though.

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    Senior Member phredd's Avatar
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    For a short period of time Charles Dickens lived in No 11 Ordnance Terrace in Chatham Kent. The house has a plaque with the infor on it saying 'Charles Dickens Lived here'
    We lived just up the road in Rochester Street and a house further up the road, No 11, also had a plaque on it saying 'Charles Dickens never ever lived here'. Tourists getting mixed up with street names and the fact that most of his work was in the city of 'Rochester'
    There is a great show in Rochester every year = The Dickens Festival'. Well worth going to see if you are ever down that way = Nice Cathederal and Castle, well worth a vistit.
    Phredd
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    Quote Originally Posted by phredd View Post
    For a short period of time Charles Dickens lived in No 11 Ordnance Terrace in Chatham Kent. The house has a plaque with the infor on it saying 'Charles Dickens Lived here'
    We lived just up the road in Rochester Street and a house further up the road, No 11, also had a plaque on it saying 'Charles Dickens never ever lived here'. Tourists getting mixed up with street names and the fact that most of his work was in the city of 'Rochester'
    There is a great show in Rochester every year = The Dickens Festival'. Well worth going to see if you are ever down that way = Nice Cathederal and Castle, well worth a vistit.
    Phredd
    Hi Phredd

    Thanks for this. Indeed, there's no doubt whatsoever that Charles Dickens' major identification is with Rochester and Chatham despite his globetrotting activities as a travelling lecturer. Thus, the sites associated with him in Rochester and the new Charles Dickens theme park in Chatham.

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Have not been back there for a few years now. All the wifes family have passed on so we have no need.
    Nice to know they are giving somthing to the town. The theme park sounds a great idea
    Phredd
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    There still remains over half of the original 'Dickens' streets, between Upper Warwick Street and Upper Park Street...named in his honour.

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    Colins Bridewell, I beleive have or used to have a drama night, short plays storys, acting, monologues. Perhaps, they are doing a Dickens theme night?
    Dingle Community Theatre are doing a number of short plays to commemorate Dickens association with Liverpool. I will post the plays and venues when I have more info! One is at Our Lady Mount Carmel Club, one at Windsor street Library, ( built by Carnegie, and opened by him) And a final night at Liverpool Community College Myrtle Street, where all the plays will be performed.

  22. #22
    Walden
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    Charles Dickens and Liverpool

    • Dickens’ first visit to Liverpool was in 1842 when he stayed at the Adelphi Hotel.

    • In 1844 he chaired the annual Christmas Soiree at Liverpool’s Mechanics Institute. During this visit he researched the characteristics of people living in Whitechapel.

    • On his final visit to Liverpool in 1860 he was made an honorary member of the Literary and Philosophical Society. A public banquet was held in his honour at the Town Hall.

    • Dickens’ inspiration for his novel The Uncommercial Traveller was based on his research at Liverpool Docks and his visits to the workhouse on Brownlow Hill.

    • Dickens’ final words on stage were: “From these garish lights I vanish now for evermore.” Three months later, in 1870, he died.

    Source

  23. #23
    Libertarian
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    There is also the penny readings as well at the museum or art gallery (At Christmas) in William Brown St where tutors from the uni read Dicken's work live.

    Entrance costs one penny!!!

  24. #24
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walden View Post
    Charles Dickens and Liverpool


    • On his final visit to Liverpool in 1860 he was made an honorary member of the Literary and Philosophical Society. A public banquet was held in his honour at the Town Hall.

    Source
    Joseph Sharples says the Bridewell (recently Colins Bridewell, but since renamed) was built in 1861.
    Sharples is usually very reliable, although older sources have put the Bridewell as c1850.
    I'd lay money that because Sharples is so precise about the date, that he's right, so if 1860 was Dickens last visit to Liverpool there can't be a connection to Colin's Bridewell.
    Last edited by PhilipG; 05-28-2007 at 05:02 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkA View Post
    Page 3 of the following link...http://www.liverpool.gov.uk/Images/tcm21-32267.pdf...shows that the station Dickens served as a policeman was at the junction of Argyle Street/York Street/Lydia Ann Street.
    Colin's Bridewell is on Campbell Street. As I mentioned above, the station Dickens served is marked on page 3 (No.35) of the site that's linked.
    Last edited by MarkA; 05-28-2007 at 05:33 PM.

  26. #26
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkA View Post
    Colin's Bridewell is on Campbell Street. As I mentioned above, the station Dickens served is marked on page 3 (No.35) of the site that's linked.
    I've just had to download Adobe to see that map.
    Personally, I think they've put the number on the wrong corner.
    Campbell Street is only on the next corner, and there wouldn't have been two Police Stations so close together.
    Besides, it would only have been some sort of honourary position for Dickens.

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    Senior Member marie's Avatar
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    Thanx all for look for info

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    For immediate release Thursday, June 7 2007

    In the footsteps of Dickens



    Armistead Maupin to visit Liverpool’s St George’s Hall

    Renowned author will appear as part of Homotopia festival

    Tickets on sale now


    BRITAIN'S favourite gay author is set to make a rare appearance at St George’s Hall.

    Armistead Maupin – who last year was voted the country’s most popular author in the Big Gay Read – will read from his new novel, ‘Michael Tolliver Lives’, and talk about his life and work, at a special event organised by Liverpool’s gay arts festival, Homotopia, on July 4.

    Often compared to Charles Dickens, Maupin will appear in the newly refurbished Small Concert Room – the same venue where Dickens took part in the famed ‘Penny Readings’ in the mid-nineteenth century.

    His Liverpool appearance is the first date in a national tour, and the only major event outside London. Best known for his series ‘Tales of the City’, which was adapted for television, Maupin is widely regarded as one of America’s greatest living gay writers.

    Gary Everett, Homotopia Festival Director, said: “I am thrilled that such a high profile author has agreed to attend this special one-off event and give a reading at the festival.

    “Armistead Maupin has also kindly agreed to attend several community events in the day, before taking part in what promises to be a glittering occasion in the grand surroundings of the Small Concert Room.”

    Amongst the community projects that Maupin will visit while he is in Liverpool is the Armistead Centre – the gay health project that was named in his honour.

    Homotopia, which is supported by the Liverpool Culture Company, celebrates its fourth birthday in 2007. Although it is responsible for events throughout the year, the main focus of the programme is in November. The festival celebrated a massively successful year in 2006, with audiences of more than 6,500 attending a wide selection of events in genres including theatre, film, art, and heritage.

    Councillor Warren Bradley, Leader of Liverpool city council, said: “Homotopia is a fantastic example of a homegrown arts festival that has developed into a major event on Liverpool’s cultural calendar.

    “It’s a great reflection of the vibrancy of the city’s arts sector.”

    Tickets for the Armistead Maupin event are on sale now, priced at £6 each, available from Unity Theatre, (0151) 709 4988; or News From Nowhere, (0151) 708 7270. Doors open at 6pm, the event begins at 7pm.

    ENDS



    Notes to Editors:

    Homotopia 2007 takes place from November 1 to 18. For more information visit www.homotopia.net

    Armistead Maupin was born in Washington DC in 1944, but was brought up in North Carolina. A graduate of the University of North Carolina, he served as a naval officer in Vietnam before moving to California in 1971 as reporter for the Associated Press. In 1976 he launched his daily newspaper serial Tales of the City, in the San Francisco Chronicle. The first fiction to appear in an American daily for decades, Tales grew into an international sensation when compiled and rewritten as novels. Maupin's six volume series are now multi-million copy bestsellers published around the world. In 2006, Tales of the City won the coveted UK's Big Gay Read (the UK's favourite gay/lesbian novel) beating Sarah Waters, Alan Hollinghurst, Jeanette Winterson and Annie Proulx amongst others. www.armisteadmaupin.com.

    St George’s Hall was re-opened on April 23 2007 (St George’s Day) following a £23m, five-year renovation programme, which included the restoration of the Small Concert Room.

    Liverpool Culture Company is delivering Liverpool’s 800th anniversary celebrations in 2007 and co-ordinating the 2008 European Capital of Culture programme.


    A high resolution image of Armistead Maupin is available on request.

    For more information, please contact Helen Johnson, on (0151) 233 4032 or 07725 150 738.

    For the latest news from Liverpool, European Capital of Culture 2008, visit www.liverpool.gov.uk or www.liverpool08.com.
    www.inacityliving.piczo.com/

    Updated weekly with old and new pics.

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    Default bridewell

    I thought all big police stations were called bridewells, if not what makes a police station a police station.and a bridewell a bridewell?the cop shop in dale street.(Where one pays ones fines)is I think a briewell.

  30. #30
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardo View Post
    I thought all big police stations were called bridewells, if not what makes a police station a police station.and a bridewell a bridewell?the cop shop in dale street.(Where one pays ones fines)is I think a briewell.
    Bridewell means prison (also reformatory), so, presumably police stations with cells were called Bridewells.
    Both the Everton and Wavertree lock-ups were Bridewells, but not police stations.
    Last edited by PhilipG; 06-28-2007 at 09:12 PM.

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