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    Default New Kid on the Block

    South Liverpool began for me aged 11 and rather than experiencing one district I managed to cover almost all of the area. Woolton, Allerton, Speke, Garston, Aigburth, Liverpool 8 and of cause Penny Lane. Growing up around there was a fantastic experience in the sixties. Community is sometimes an ambiguous or vague term. The post war model of the functional working class family was never comprehensive to the area although in places it was prominent. When people reflect on their upbringing they often find themselves going along with established norms and conventions. Some of my experiences and memories might not be in line with the dominant views. However they are relevant to what has shaped you. Liverpool 8 was culturally different to most of south Liverpool yet Liverpool 8 has created more positive cultural strains than any other district. Art has always been something in abundance in the area. In this age of recognizing diversity in society we sometimes are cajoled into believing the past was better than it is now. I don?t agree with that view and I would argue that in the sixties you had problems too. The biggest problem was poverty. I can remember the most appalling poverty in south Liverpool and also an institutional resignation to the problem. What I liked about south Liverpool was the physical environment. The blue suburban sky and green tree lined avenues, the wide open spaces. Wales and the river, parks and wildlife we had it all. We also shared even then a sense of respect for other cultures. Lennon often reflected this in his music and his parochial stance was born out of a love for his roots. Adrian Henri could make a walk down Parliament Street seem like a poetic Utopia. The reason being he had a profound respect for people. That?s the south Liverpool I loved and the experience reflected in the art of Lennon and others. People become real and tangible entities not shadows. The comings and goings of Penny Lane are seen through the life experience of ordinary people. And then there is solidarity and compassion for and with those around you. It doesn?t really matter where you come from or how well or badly you were brought up. We all make choices, it is the person you become that matters and the respect you have for others. Sometimes in the Kop on a Saturday afternoon I would hear things and experience forms of aggression that were alien to me. That?s part of growing up. Yet on a Sunday I would go for a walk through Allerton or Woolton or Aigburth and feel happy being from such a nice environment.


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    Last edited by Paddy; 07-17-2009 at 06:08 AM.
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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    So south Liverpool and environs what does it mean to me later in life? Well you can never please everyone. Some people like to think that they have established roots and that?s natural. However growing up in a place will invariably lead to conflicting perspectives on the experience, suffice to say I could never let myself be pinned down to any collective or cultural experience owing to the uniqueness of my own experience. However some experiences are shared and uniform and a point of reference. Leaving school and getting a job is one. I remember my first job after getting kicked out of John Almonds. It was a small galvanizing firm on Scotland Road by the Rotunda. I was just a trainee dogsbody and the job was a dead end job only the wage packet was something to look forward too. The 500 limited stop bus would take me there from outside the Cricket Club at Aigburth. Armstrong and Lyons was the name of the firm. The job never lasted I never wanted it too but it was a learning curve. I then worked for Tesco?s Penny Lane and Childwall branches. Great days that could not last forever but the fun and laughter were a big part of it all. Wages is the thing that makes us mercenary and my loyalty to the company waned on pay days. However there were plenty of big factories in South Liverpool then and I got a start at Evans Medical Speke and was quite happy with a very attractive girlfriend. So yes I had the typical working class lad experience. Somehow there was another side to all this and that was subject to my previous history being brought up in child care. That makes you different being a foster kid puts you in a sort of class limbo. It also led me to a much different path in life. In care you can take nothing for granted as the security of home life is not something that you can fall back on. In those days there was scant provision for teenagers like me and even if you had a job you could still be homeless and that was a big problem. So then that ultimately led to hanging out on the streets. People can say ?Oh he was no angel? how can anyone who run the streets of Liverpool 8 be an angel? So there was run ins with the law fighting and general juvenile delinquency, that?s called fitting in, or survival in real terms. I met the worst down town as a lad and made a judgement then that I would not want to live like them. Having said that you meet decent people too and people who would do you no harm. Then there was the teenage culture of suburban south Liverpool and I am thankful for that and the joy of being a teenager in Aigburth and Garston and Speke. Yes we had great times and lots of natural teenage fun. Dances and parties and that excitement that teenagers feel about life. I was persistently in love and incurably romantic. Why not? You are only young once. When people out of town ask me where about in Liverpool am I from I often hesitate Liverpool is a big spread. We all have loyalties to families and friends and those who have influenced us. I visited my mother in Huyton for Thirty years and so I could say Huyton I have no problem with that. Yet my teenage days and my friends who are still around are very dear and the hopes and aspirations we had as younger people are very much a bond in life. That was the great thing about being brought up in South Liverpool the values we held as kids were somewhat mixed so there was no dominant code or ritualistic mode of behaviour. One week we would be in a working man?s club and the next week we would be in the Rugby or Cricket club. We danced in colleges and pubs went to church dances and back street night clubs a funny old mix really. And then for me there was the Parks and South Liverpool had plenty of them I knew every nook and cranny of Sefton Park. The Magpies were my friends and the open fields were for singing in. I loved that aspect of South Liverpool life. The wide open spaces and the greens of summer with the tall trees canopying the pleasant walks. South Liverpool and Environs what does it mean to me?
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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    Default Dingle Mount

    So Dingle aged 11 was a strange environment as strange as Liverpool and both experiences were strange to the trained altar boy from Crosby. I remember Dingle Mount the stairs leading up to the landing and the smells of washing and cooking. The tenements were a whole new world and there was a sense of freedom. It wasn?t a contrived freedom as in being allowed to play and stay out a bit later. It was a freedom that stood in the face of authority a freedom that came from belonging to a class of city dwellers whose history was one of neglect by the established Liverpool institutions. The tennies had an autonomous life of their own and being poor was not a sin. Some people really fear poverty in fact most people do. However as a kid I can remember being deliriously happy playing with my mates in a world that we created. Aspirations were limited to the day. The ice cream van brought a treat that somehow we could always afford. Authority was another world and even the grownups looked on it with certain hostility. A cup of tea was always on offer to a welcome visitor, but doors were closed to the unwanted or prying. ?Behave yourselves or you will have the police at the door? Running messages for the older folk were not a chore it was a joy and often went rewarded. ?Buying goods on the step never went on it just never stopped? A six of chips and a fishcake or if your Dar comes up it?s a Fish or Chow Mien with lemmo. And at night under the simple Dingle stars we told stories. Ghosts that haunted every Street and corner of Liverpool. ?Go on Mar tell us about screeching Jinni down by the Davy Louey?. ?And that one who washes the steps of the Northern? and the sailor who was in the woman?s kitchen before they found out he had gone down to Davy Jones locker?. Then there was singing, that one who always sings ?The chocolate soldier from the USA?. We told stories till sleep was the only relief from fear. And sometimes you looked out at the dark Dingle sky and knew that it was home and nothing much else existed except on telly or down town. We never went to church as it was too much in the way of authority. The Priest came now and then but with all the comings and goings it was obvious that people were too busy to go to church and to superstitious to refuse the one true authority. I remember seeing the Lodge march for the first time I was made up hearing a band on a Sunday. Getting all excited and wanting to run out and watch them. Me Mam looking at me wistfully and saying ?it?s the lodge? 1965 before the onset of the troubles in Ireland I never really understood I still don?t who does? To a kid a band is a band and music is the delight of the universe. Back then it was all so innocent anyway still is really people just get brought up in different traditions, but being poor your all in the same boat. You can borrow off any religion till pay day that was the main tradition. School was okay if you went and never had a fight. Sometimes I wished that I could have a free day from it all just be myself and stick my head in a book. You could see the ships from the landing and quite often feel the strong breezes from the river. The river was visible but with so much going on it was largely ignored unless you got the number one down to the Pier Head that meant passing School and keeping your head down.
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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    Garston in 1966 was a bustling place. The Gas works dominated the skyline. Those huge storage tanks could be seen for miles. The baths with the old fashioned gantries and tiny changing cubicles was a place we all headed too for swimming and getting our eyes full of chloride. Sometimes coming home it was a strain to see the number of the bus. I did a stint at Blessed John Almonds in the first year and then left to go to St Georges on Mill Street, returning for my final turbulent year and show down with the dreaded Gertrude. In those days the huts on Horrocks Avenue were used for art and metal work. Kids from the Dingle came to use the metal work facility. We sold them our Dinner tickets and then went up to the Crescent for chips and loosies. Blessed Johns in my final year 1969 was not a very good school. I was treated like a retard yet in other Schools I had come second and third in class. I once came first and second in every subject except maths and finished second in class. Somehow my academic skills disappeared in Blessed Johns and the spectre of religion dominated in a last year that would see a lot of us just leave with nothing. I remonstrated with Gertrude that religious instruction was not really a social skill. She really disliked me and as a pupil detested my prior religious knowedge. The paradox being that they had drummed it into me in the first place in Crosby. 1969 my mate?s parents wanted to take me in and give me a home Graham had a nice house in Mossley Hill but again the hidden hand prevented them. Anyway Blessed John ended abruptly as a schoolboy prank went wrong. The fire brigade was phoned up and a hoax bomb warning was shouted down the phone in a bored dinner time stunt. I took the rap and got expelled. The huts on Horrocks became Nobby House (Noblet House Youth Club) I loved those days playing table tennis and dancing with the girls I knocked about with Lana a lot then she married Jimmy Case I went with her mate Carol who although had just left school had the figure of a super model. Nobby House was two and half hours from 7-30 till 10 it could have gone on forever I just loved being there with my friends. It was far better than hanging out on corners. Getting the subs was always important and the shilling to get in was sometimes hard to come by. Then we all started working and after a while the youth club sanctuary made way for the pub. I remember Window Lane in those days. I did a stint at Kings (Waterhouse) putting bottled beer into crates. I also did a stint in the Tan yards but the smell was diabolical and would linger even after you had a bath or so it seemed to a brut smeared teenager. Sometimes they had dances at the CO-op on St Mary?s road there was no ale but it was fun and all the girls looked nice. I was a very good dancer don?t ask me why there is no reason just a knack. I think hearing a lot of black music at home helped my older brothers were really into Tamala and soul. They opened a club called the New Look on St Mary?s road but it was a dive, are you a member? Give us a break! In my late teens like so many other Garston lads I would often end up drunk as a skunk in Jons Nite Spot behind Lennon?s carpets. Everyone would end up there after 11-30. Well I never saw that much trouble there regardless of its reputation. The Allerton was the place we all hung out. I liked the Allerton but to be truthful I secretly despised drug culture. All my teenage was spent bluffing. You just went along with it. Looking back I see the damage and the hurt and pain that drugs brought with them. Still a joint on a Friday before town was the in thing and you just went along with it. Those days? papers weren?t skins and making a joint was often a task bestowed on my good self. Roll a joint was the expression then and not skin up. The thought of dropping a tab was harrowing it was bad enough smoking a joint with some numpties never mind tripping with them. People referred to us as the click but the label was obscure as nobody ever really owned up to being one. The click had to be the most secretive gang ever. I still don?t know who is who other than the leadership has changed hands over the years not through power struggles. Just a stubborn reluctance by the members not to be responsible for the actions of others.


    I met Eileen and we fell in love we both loved each other intensely and our relationship for that reason went off the rails. We fought like cat and dog and then would make up. The thing I most remember her for was the times she would stay out all night with me if I had been kicked out, a regular occurrence in my teens. I was often homeless and Eileen would stay with me on park benches or down the Pier Head. Eileen was a very good looking girl and quick witted. I would tell down at the swings that I would make something out of life. She just loved me then and I loved her. However due to my wild life style we parted. Eileen lived by the main gates of Blessed Johns but we spent a lot of time down the Dingle. Still I hope she is okay now. And then we all started to go our own ways. 1973 and I left came back in 74 and left for good in 75 landing in Dunstable in 76. Sometimes I think what it would have been like if I had got in Fords and married. Well I might have had kids something I would have liked. And I would most likely still hang out with my mates from Allerton Garston and Aigburth. Thing is work has always dictated the state of play. I applied for Ford and never got in so I had to go. If I had had a trade that?s a good start for anyone in life! Things might have been a whole lot different. Anyway I have my degree now (come on Eileen!!) I have worked with lots of tradesmen and that is a regret not having one myself. Yet looking back you can see that even as a rebellious teenager in my last year at John Almond with the repressed nun banging on about religion I had a point. Skills for the world of work are the best asset leaving school not blind allegiance to a faith that rejected working class consciousness. Perhaps that is why I never got into Fords. Left wing politics. I always admired the shop stewards movement. People now bang on about how the unions ruined everything. Yet shop floor awareness made for a healthy working class experience and let?s face it they couldn?t be labelled careerist. I would often buy left wing papers on a Friday night when everyone was out posing. I would look at terms like Dialectical Materialism and wonder what it was all about. South Liverpool and particularly Speke was quite a wide awake community. However I never got in El Dorado (Fords) and read Marx elsewhere.
    Last edited by Paddy; 07-24-2009 at 11:24 AM.
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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    So Aigburth and Garston became the stomping ground. Aigburth was lovely in summer the prom took you from Beechwood to Aigburth vale via Otterspool Park. Otterspool Park was a wonderful park with tree?s that surrounded you creating shade and a blitz of meandering hues. The trees came from all over the world and the grey Park path bended its way down to the prom and the wide solemn Mersey. You could see the sailors walking on the decks of Garston bound ships. Small Russian vessels with that sea scarred battle look about them. I once saw a big Russian sailor in the Wellington in Garston he must have been seven foot or more. He was drunk and kept banging on the bar. When he banged on the bar the whole Welly shook and the barmaid just run and got the bear another one. Then there was Aigburth Cricket Club, or should I say Liverpool Cricket Club? It is actually in Garston as the district sign is just outside and it is actually called Liverpool Cricket Club. Sometimes in summer mainly bank holidays they had county Cricket. You could see Hampshire or Sussex or Essex sometimes twice a year. Well look at the wall and ask me did we pay to get in? No chance! Clive Lloyd played for Lancashire and the West Indies in those days. He was tall and Athletic looking and he gave Lancashire certain glamour. We could never get in the beer tent as if you went over the wall it meant you never had a ticket stub. The guys in the white coats who marshalled the event would stand at the entrance to the beer tent checking stubs. So perusing the ground for discarded ticket stubs was often the way round that one. They pulled down the old Aigburth arms and put up the Kingsman. They had glass show cases for the Kings Regiment and memorabilia like tin helmets bayonets and stuff. I was too young to go in the old Aigburth arms and to into football to want to. And that is what we did. We played football 24-7 well not quite but we did play a lot. In the summer evenings we played down by the prom and the bright silent sun would slowly vanish leaving the Mersey to the mercy of the moon. We would pile up to the chippie and share chips and coke relieving the appetites created by the footballing exertions?. I remember how good Jimmy Case was at fourteen he could hit the ball so hard. Yet as he pointed out to me he couldn?t hold a candle to my dancing. And we went to all the dances in the colleges and schools in the summertime in green Aigburth and Allerton and most of south Liverpool. Hedonistic fun loving days. And sometimes in the sought out solitude I walked along the prom alone and dreamt. Make up poems and songs in my head. I always thought how much I would like to write about the place the impressions the will to share and articulate the youthful experience. Right there I kissed Marie in spring dusk and before it was dark walked to the bus stop with her my very first kiss. She has gone now but like every mortal on the planet I remember that very first young and innocent happening. Two kids alone with the Mersey its solemn self and Wales brooding. And sometimes my thoughts would stray to thinking about thinking. Cognition. Forget secondary school and the lack of ambition, focus, and potential. You are a conscious entity. You perceive all you see hear and touch from that premise. That is you have a notion of your existence. So does that bird. Yes but that is instinct. They don?t plan funerals in that existence. How is it then that we can be so close? The thoughts and questions that we grapple with as we make our way through the vortex of data and chimeras that accompany youth. Look over at Wales it has seen so many lives come and go the snow topped Snowdonia is witness to all our joys and sadness. And sometimes on lonely days when as a lad I could not work out my plight. I would just come and walk along the prom. Then you see another person most likely thinking about thinking. Sometimes a dog racing around after a ball. Kids alighting from cars skipping down to the waiting grey Mersey beyond the safe railings.








    Fortunately we lived in a time when you could think. I mean if you?re ducking for cover and dodging Jets it doesn?t give you much scope to reflect on matters. Why we go to war is beyond me. The Greeks inscribed over all their temples ?know thyself? So it would be nice if everyone took sometime out to discover who they are and what their potential is and what they can offer to the world they live in. Kennedy said much the same. The Beatles then had gone into their intellectual phase. I liked Revolution the b side to ?Hey Jude? ideology and dogma is not the way forward. Awareness is a raised level of consciousness. Sometimes I wanted a revolution yeah let?s get it on. Then you look at history and the way things get distorted and you see where Lennon was coming from. And we all loved ?Get Back? and the days were long and there was an excitement in the air as there always is for the young. So I sloped off to Libraries without bothering too much about what others thought. The central International Library or the dome as I called it was very interesting and had all the books you could want. Yet a little knowledge is no good, you have to get the whole picture. However you could find out about things to think about on the prom, when you thought about thinking if you get my drift? That was much better than worrying about who was tough or why your girl left you. Pull yourself together man it happens to everyone. So you consider your life opportunities and in south Liverpool there was a time when you did feel secure about jobs and such like. Then in the mid seventies it changed. I have always argued that the eighties recession started earlier in Liverpool It hit the unskilled hardest and with the arrival of home buying and credit quite a few people just jogged along and did not give massive unemployment much thought. However for Speke and Kirkby things changed rather earlier and work was very hard to find in any part of Liverpool after 76. I have been out since then and yet coming back once or twice a year I notice things. Labour intensive industry has gone in this country. The factories that thrived in the post war period are now just shells or standing empty. What?s? new. Service industry and Retail that?s about it. Looking at Speke you can see the industrial Parks are not going to reinstate labour intensive industry. That is how it was for me in south Liverpool on one hand you have the relaxed attitude of living in a nice suburban part of the city. Then on the other hand you rely on industry to allow yourself to make a living and when the cohesion is not there it is one big problem. I remember Whitley Lang and Neal on the Airport roundabout in the seventies. Through the windows you could see all the craftsmen working on their lathes. It made you feel that the area was alive and that industry was dynamic and part of the life of Speke. Then like everywhere else it got boarded up. Then you went passed on the bus and feeling of being from something was replaced by alienation and a certain intellectual ennui. I think through training we can give the young a future. The old exists alongside the new and things move on and looking back is just that looking back the new world of work is different.
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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    In the seventies in winter the lights went out from 6-9 at night during the miner?s dispute. Well in those days I was running around Liverpool 8. That?s when I started to think that life could be better. Don?t get me wrong I went a long with things and stuff happened but mainly it was the result of older lads manipulating the situation. I mean running around Parly in the pitch dark was quite scary if you know what I mean. There were that many different gangs nobody knew who was who. When the lights went back on all you could hear was Alarm bells ringing. I started to question what is was all about rather than get in on taking advantage of the situation. It was essential however to have mates as they were very scary times. I had a flat on Princess Avenue at the top by the Federal on the corner of Stanhope. The flat fell apart around me owning to the drug culture at the time. Someone gave me a tab of acid and I went into a psychosis it was no joke. If was as if I was full of shame at such an intense level that my mind could not cope with the feeling. I was told it was going to be a brilliant experience and in fact it was hell. I came down but my mind was affected by the awful experience of LSD. Then my flat mate wanted to fight with me over a tin of beans we went to the park but the grass was so slippy I could not stand up and the fight was aborted. However in my state of mind I was in no condition to fight I felt lost in the world. I suggested to my mate that the guys who had supplied the LSD had also put him up to fight with me and that was the truth of the matter. The mentality around me was quite backward and criminal and very dangerous. So much for flower power Liverpool 8 style. And it was all about survival and being one step ahead. Sometimes you would see a lad and he would be happy and smart looking perhaps with a girlfriend. Then you would hear the label of he is a ?fart? and guarantee you would see the kid go downhill and eventually if he wasn?t stabbed he got beaten up. That was the way the drug gangs worked.

    As you get older you look back on things and it is not difficult to see that situations get manipulated. I was a very bright kid and went against the grain as far as criminality went. Anyway my upbringing was so intensely religious I had a steel hard moral code and sense of right and wrong. So when people blame the kids for what?s going on they should look further into things because so much manipulation goes on and there is so much deviancy. Park Road was no better at night in those days and yet ordinary people who you don?t see in the bars at night are the salt of the earth. I loved the Dingle in the sixties. Yet being a teenager was quite scary. Then I started getting stalked by a right ***** fella. These days? people tolerate gay sexuality but this guy was just plainly a pervert who hung around lavatories and he wasn?t the only one. He must have taken a fancy to my angelic altar boy looks and manners. Anyway talk about stalking the man was a monster and a complete threat to children yet he functioned in the night time community with no problem at all. He was all for the national front and Oswald Moseley. When the NF sign first appeared in our block I thought it was the symbol for a fire hydrant. Anyway they were active in the area trying to manipulate white kids. The pervert eventually killed a gay boy down town I knew he was capable of such things as he constantly threatened to kill me. I was in town one night and I saw the snake still as evil as ever with his nasty crew around him. Funny how people like that can thrive in the community. Still if he is not dead he is quite old now perhaps he should reflect on his sad life but then that is all a bit too late. Still he always was a loser picking on me was his biggest mistake. And so growing up is all about learning I had a reputation for being a scrapper and I hated it I would much rather be in the library reading a good book. Thing is in the kids homes you had to fight. There was no mum in the dormitory and if a kid hit you while you were in bed you had to get out and fight you had no choice. And there again such activity was manipulated. So with all the training in the kids homes and then add the alcohol I was a bit of a lad in my teens. Still I could see through it and I was aware then of the hidden hand working against me. I often wondered who financed the pervert that was stalking me.



    Well the twilight world goes on and you either stay put in it or move on and I moved on. Still I like a stroll down Parly and I like real true debate on the destiny of the urban poor and I have admiration for people who get involved in trying to make life better for the less fortunate. There is nothing wrong with promoting black consciousness it is the same as raising the awareness of working class people. If you have people who you can talk too then your half way there. Take away the bullies and manipulators and you find yourself talking to real people. I have always hated racism and especially the racism that you are supposed to accept as the norm. That?s the kind of racism that isolates you in your own community. It is the racism that hurts the most because it is institutional and acceptable. And so the task at hand is to change the world but you cannot do that alone not that I would want to be in a political party. I have my poetry to consider. Yet you do need to be aware and if I thought the time had come for me to be out on the street protesting about injustice I would have no hesitation. I believe in people power and attempting to change things where we would we be now without those who have stood up against the ills that plague society?
    Last edited by Paddy; 07-26-2009 at 05:14 PM.
    Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
    Time held me green and dying
    Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

    Dylan Thomas

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