Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 46 to 54 of 54

Thread: Barclay's (Martin's) Bank Doors Linked to Slavery?

  1. #46
    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Third rock
    Posts
    1,131
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Town Hall Frieze Panels

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    There's a similar sculpture to the Martin's Bank sculptures on the Federal Trade Commission in Washington, D.C.

    One of the panels in D.C. shows an African handing over an elephant's tusk for a bag of money. Some could choose to interpret that relief as showing the slave trade although to my mind it's part of an effort just to show commerce over the centuries, and so is appropriate for the type of scene you might want for the U.S. Federal Trade Commission building when it was built in the Art Deco period of the early Twentieth Century.

    Of course today such a depiction might not be "politically correct" both because of depiction of the ivory trade, now illegal, as well as the idea that some Africans made money off African resources, whether it be the gold, diamonds, ivory or, yes, the black gold of slavery.
    Hi Chris - sorry, I must have missed your reply when you first posted it.

    Elephant's tusks [and head] appear on Liverpool Town Hall's frieze. They sit next to other African animals: bison, crocodile, camel, lion. And also, what appears to be an African child's head wearing a plume of ostrich feathers. The east elevation [and frieze] dates from 1754. So another 53 years until ban on Slavery took hold. These are undoubtedly symbols of the fruits of Liverpool commence at that time.

    The African child's head wearing the ostrich feathers is puzzling? Symbolically in Egypt, "ostrich feathers" have represented 'justice, righteousness and truth' which seems an odd message to put out considering the African trade. However, some panels have symbols of England in them - 'a spray of oak' in the lion panel [although this was installed much later, designed in 1792]. If the headdress was English inspired rather than African, the 'three ostrich feathers' could symbolise something more akin to the Prince of Wales' herald, which usually carried the words "Ich Dien" ["I serve"] beneath it?

    Can someone please post some photo's of the east facing Town Hall frieze panels? The side looking towards the museum. Thanks.



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	town.jpg 
Views:	408 
Size:	11.7 KB 
ID:	16389Click image for larger version. 

Name:	lpool frieze.jpg 
Views:	1128 
Size:	46.0 KB 
ID:	16390
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."... ... ... Mark Twain.

  2. #47
    Senior Member ChrisGeorge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    3,590

    Default

    Hi Dazza

    Thanks, Dazza. The African child's head with the ostrich plumes is similar to the head on a Barbados penny of 1788, which you can see in this URL from Bolton Museums and Archive Service:

    http://www.boltonmuseums.org.uk/coll...arbados-penny/

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
    Editor, Ripperologist
    Editor, Loch Raven Review
    http://christophertgeorge.blogspot.com/
    Chris on Flickr and on MySpace

  3. #48
    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Third rock
    Posts
    1,131
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Hi Dazza

    Thanks, Dazza. The African child's head with the ostrich plumes is similar to the head on a Barbados penny of 1788, which you can see in this URL from Bolton Museums and Archive Service:

    http://www.boltonmuseums.org.uk/coll...arbados-penny/

    Chris
    Wow, that's amazing Chris,

    The Barbados Penny [1788] carries the three ostrich feather plume [headdress to the slave] with "I Serve" written beneath. Most English people will recognise the German words "Ich Dien" meaning "I Serve" and are still printed on today's two-pence-piece which also carries the three ostrich feather plume. I'm now convinced this is the same symbolism as that displayed on Liverpool Town Hall frieze.

    Thanks for that.

    Daz

    EDIT: The Barbados Penny - they may have used the 'Prince of Wales' three ostrich feather plume to represent the highest level of service you could attain next to the crown itself, as monarch's rule and do not serve.

    IOW, the 'Prince of Wales' plume represents the highest office of service which has command over you, from which you must obey.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."... ... ... Mark Twain.

  4. #49
    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crosby
    Posts
    2,199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Hi Dazza

    Thanks, Dazza. The African child's head with the ostrich plumes is similar to the head on a Barbados penny of 1788, which you can see in this URL from Bolton Museums and Archive Service:

    http://www.boltonmuseums.org.uk/coll...arbados-penny/

    Chris
    An interesting link there,Chris!

  5. #50
    Senior Member mickeydoolan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    37
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MissInformed View Post
    i couldnt believe she wanted to change Penny Lane!
    from the tourism aspect, it is such a sacred place for many people the world over!
    She didn't want to change Penny Lane when it was pointed out that the lane was named after Henry Penny. The stupid woman hadn't done her homework. She soon dropped it when it was pointed out who Henry Penny was.

  6. #51
    Senior Member fortinian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    384
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Who is Henry Penny, Mickey?

    Forgive my ignorance!

  7. #52
    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Crosby
    Posts
    2,199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fortinian View Post
    Who is Henry Penny, Mickey?

    Forgive my ignorance!
    James Penny,I think he means!

  8. #53
    Re-member Ged's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Here, there & everywhere.
    Posts
    7,197

    Default

    Which is why she wanted to change it.
    www.inacityliving.piczo.com/

    Updated weekly with old and new pics.

  9. #54
    Senior Member ChrisGeorge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    3,590

    Default

    Yes but it doesn't look to me as if anyone produced any evidence that Penny Lane got its name from James Penny, even though that has been the assumption. It could be just a coincidence of names.

    Chris

    Christopher T. George
    Editor, Ripperologist
    Editor, Loch Raven Review
    http://christophertgeorge.blogspot.com/
    Chris on Flickr and on MySpace

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Similar Threads

  1. Martin`s Bank,Water St,
    By gregs dad in forum Buildings and Structures
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-02-2008, 03:16 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •