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Thread: Lime Street Station c.1890

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    Senior Member Colin Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Default Lime Street Station c.1890

    Watching Michael Portillo’s programme Great British Railway Journeys, it struck me how often it is outsiders who make the most of Liverpool’s heritage. In this instance, Portillo was enthusing about the unique place Lime Street Station held in the history of the railway. His first impression – the magnificent canyon cut out of rock as [...]

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Nice one Colin.

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    Senior Member RonnieW's Avatar
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    My dad worked there for thirty years. I have some very happy memories of Lime Street station as a boy. My dad would take me there, get his friends to let me onto the footplate and sometimes let me travel to Edge Hill in the guards van. When you're six or seven years old, it's a great experience.

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    That musta been great Ronnie.

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    Senior Member RonnieW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablo42 View Post
    That musta been great Ronnie.
    It was mate! The old feller started at 14 in 1943. His dad and three brothers were all railwaymen and my grandma worked on the railways during WW2. The street we lived in was owned by the railway before being taken over by Liverpool University. As soon as I was old enough to drink, my dad took me to Ma Eggies, The Legs of Man, Lord Warden and The Courthouse. He left British Rail for British Leyland because he couldn't stand the new type of managers who had no experience of the job. That was in 1973! If he could see the nuggets running things now, he's start a revolution on his own.

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonnieW View Post
    It was mate! The old feller started at 14 in 1943. His dad and three brothers were all railwaymen and my grandma worked on the railways during WW2. The street we lived in was owned by the railway before being taken over by Liverpool University. As soon as I was old enough to drink, my dad took me to Ma Eggies, The Legs of Man, Lord Warden and The Courthouse. He left British Rail for British Leyland because he couldn't stand the new type of managers who had no experience of the job. That was in 1973! If he could see the nuggets running things now, he's start a revolution on his own.
    It's like that throughout industry now. The old train guys were a special breed indeed.

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    Senior Member RonnieW's Avatar
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    You're right mate! Bring in someone who used to be a Mars Bar salesman and who took Leeds United from Champions League football to relegation in two years, another bloke who used to sell plasterboard, another goon who cocked up the new Wembley Stadium then put them in charge of Royal Mail. And people wonder why they get their mail sometime in mid-afternoon!
    I don't suppose it's a modern thing. Didn't we almost lose two world wars by putting the clueless in charge of the armed forces?

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Ha, we nearly lost all our wars that way...

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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Thanks Colin, those platforms have born witness to a lot of emotions of the years! A place of both happiness and sadness, of comings and goings.

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    Debra
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    Quote Originally Posted by dazza View Post
    Thanks Colin, those platforms have born witness to a lot of emotions of the years! A place of both happiness and sadness, of comings and goings.
    I love old railway stations , they remind me of ciggies , and the war .. hope and loss and love ..

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debra View Post
    I love old railway stations , they remind me of ciggies , and the war .. hope and loss and love ..
    Remind me of trains...

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    Senior Member H_Asbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonnieW View Post
    You're right mate! Bring in someone who used to be a Mars Bar salesman and who took Leeds United from Champions League football to relegation in two years, another bloke who used to sell plasterboard, another goon who cocked up the new Wembley Stadium then put them in charge of Royal Mail. And people wonder why they get their mail sometime in mid-afternoon!
    I don't suppose it's a modern thing. Didn't we almost lose two world wars by putting the clueless in charge of the armed forces?
    True Story.

    During WW1 there was a lot of officers dying in the first few months, so the British Govt, thinking it was our own men sent spys to the trenches to see if it was a rebellion in progress.

    They soon discovered the cause.

    When it rained all the officers were raising Brollys to keep themselves dry, the Germans targeted the Brollys and that was that!

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by H_Asbo View Post
    True Story.

    During WW1 there was a lot of officers dying in the first few months, so the British Govt, thinking it was our own men sent spys to the trenches to see if it was a rebellion in progress.

    They soon discovered the cause.

    When it rained all the officers were raising Brollys to keep themselves dry, the Germans targeted the Brollys and that was that!
    I heard about that before. Nice one.

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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debra View Post
    I love old railway stations , they remind me of ciggies , and the war .. hope and loss and love ..
    That's why you always see them in the movies.

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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Did the original trains have to be pulled up to Edge Hill when they first started out?

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