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Thread: Largest Propeller

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    Member bangorreg's Avatar
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    Default Largest Propeller

    Hi."Acknowledgement to Arco Publishing Co . NY. For this "Photo".
    The world's largest ship's propeller has been manufactured by Hyundai Heavy Industries for a 7,200 TEU container vessel owned by Hapag Lloyd. As tall as a three storey building, the 9.1 metre diameter, six bladed propeller weighs in at 101.5 tons.
    The following photo is a 72 ton propeller fitted to the tanker Loannis coloctronis.
    Reg.

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    thaithyme

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    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
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    A real big one. The ship is not that large, only 7,200 containers, when many Panamax hold 14,000. Two props gives backup. May one is for cheapness of manufacture and/or cheap in running costs.
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    jimmy jimmy's Avatar
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    Default even larger ships propeller?


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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Amazing. There are still a couple of large props on the waste ground of the former SMM foundry by the tolls of the Wallasey Tunnel. They just seem to have been abandoned. I believe the Titanics prop was made there.

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    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The 300,000 ton tankers I used to navigate had a 4 blade Propeller 9.7m in diameter. approx. 32 feet.

    The biggest ship I ever went on was the Batillus, 555,000 DWT
    she had two props and two rudders.
    I landed on her fore deck by helicpter and went on the bridge, off Cape Town in August 1976 on her maiden voyage, she was bound for the Gulf. so I sailed around the Cape of Good Hope during a six hour helicopter operation to transferr stores.
    She was BIG.
    Tonnage: 275,276 GT
    555,000 DWT
    225,473 NT
    Length: LOA: 414.22 metres (1,359.0 ft)

    LBP: 401.10 metres (1,315.9 ft)
    Beam: 63.01 metres (206.7 ft)
    Draught: 28.5 metres (94 ft)
    Depth: 35.01 metres (114.9 ft)
    Installed power: 64,800bhp (48,321.5kW)
    Propulsion: 4 ? Stal Laval steam turbine engines
    2 ? propellers
    Speed: 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Nice one Captain. I believe they are a bugger to stop.

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    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hi Pablo,
    they are quite easy if you know how.
    If I had to do an emergency stop, tho` I shouldnt be in that situation in the first place, I can stop these giants in six tenths of a mile, with the engines still going Full Ahead.
    eg.
    Tanker 300,000 Deadweight tons.
    Course is 180 degrees, engines full ahead, 16 knots.
    Emergency stop.
    Do not touch the engine controls, leave on full ahead.
    Wheel Hard a starboard. alter 90 degrees.
    The ships head will turn to starboard, bring her to 270 degrees.
    The ship will carry on along the course line of 180 degrees beam on to the sea with the momentum, After six tenths of one mile the cushion effect of the under water draft of 65 feet and the length 1200 feet will bring the ship to a halt in the water.
    She will be stopped with the ship`s head facing 270 degrees, before she starts to pick up speed just pull back the controls and stop engines.

    If you went from full ahead to full astern to stop her you would rip out the engines.
    as I said before you should not be in that situation in the first place.

    When I alter course to a new course then I alter six tenths of one mile before the charted position, the ship will then slide to the charted position then carry on with the new course.
    They are very easy to handle if you know the ships limitations

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Reckon it's like that with everything Captain. If you know what you're doing. Did heavy storms give you much problems or wasn't you bothered cos of your size.

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    Senior Member brian daley's Avatar
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    Er, Pablo, Iknow Cap'n Kong personally and he is'nt really obese.........but his ships were somewhat bigger than usual,like the man himself!
    BrianD

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian daley View Post
    Er, Pablo, Iknow Cap'n Kong personally and he is'nt really obese.........but his ships were somewhat bigger than usual,like the man himself!
    BrianD
    Ha, you said that Brian, I shall be blamed for nowt.

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    Very interesting

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    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain kong View Post
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hi Pablo,
    they are quite easy if you know how.
    If I had to do an emergency stop, tho` I shouldnt be in that situation in the first place, I can stop these giants in six tenths of a mile, with the engines still going Full Ahead.
    eg.
    Tanker 300,000 Deadweight tons.
    Course is 180 degrees, engines full ahead, 16 knots.
    Emergency stop.
    Do not touch the engine controls, leave on full ahead.
    Wheel Hard a starboard. alter 90 degrees.
    The ships head will turn to starboard, bring her to 270 degrees.
    The ship will carry on along the course line of 180 degrees beam on to the sea with the momentum, After six tenths of one mile the cushion effect of the under water draft of 65 feet and the length 1200 feet will bring the ship to a halt in the water.
    She will be stopped with the ship`s head facing 270 degrees, before she starts to pick up speed just pull back the controls and stop engines.

    If you went from full ahead to full astern to stop her you would rip out the engines.
    as I said before you should not be in that situation in the first place.

    When I alter course to a new course then I alter six tenths of one mile before the charted position, the ship will then slide to the charted position then carry on with the new course.
    They are very easy to handle if you know the ships limitations
    Do these manouvres alter,depending on weight of cargo,or would they apply to all situations? Haven't a clue,but directing something that big,especially in rough sea's must be fun!!

  13. #13
    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    Hi Steve,
    I never had any real problems with them apart from coming up the English Channel in FOG or any other type of poor visability when fully loaded, the draft is 65 feet and with squat this increases up to 75 feet, In the Dover Straits off the Varne Bank it is very shallow and the ship starts to bounce on the bottom. Then you get a F.O.C ship coming down the channel the wrong way with no communications and apparently no one on watck, yes it can be a sweaty situation and you find yourself with two ciggies in each hand. Then the Cross Channel Ferries flying past at close quarters.
    Stood on the bridge looking ahead the nearest clear water you can see is half a mile away over the bow. If any snall vessel is less than the half a mile you cannot see it, even on Radar the sea clutter can wipe out an image at that close distance.The English Channel is one of the busiest waterways in the wordl. there can be as many as 2000 ship movements through there.
    I enjoyed doing it until we took all the big tankers to Taiwan for scrap even tho` they were only 10 to 12 years old. we then went on the North Sea run on 125,000 ton tankers like the Esso Aberdeen to the Brent Spar at the top end.

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    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
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    Ha,Ha, Two ciggies,good stuff! But,why were the tankers scrapped? I thought bigger,was better,re' oil,etc!

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    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    They became Dynosaurs, they were designed that big because of the Suez Crisis in the 60s and 70s. sailing around the Cape instead of thru` Suez. then North Sea Oil came on stream so there was no need to go to the Gulf as often. and also they didnt need as many tankers for the trade as they were shorter voyages.

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