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Thread: Ships gallery

  1. #31
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    Default Britannic & Georgic.

    Capt. Kong (Brian)



    There is a good article in this months "Shipping Today & Yesterday" entitled
    Memorable Ships all about the Georgic & Britannic with some photos.

    Alec.

  2. #32

    Thumbs up

    hi brian,i have six or seven hundred pics of merch ships,i was an avid collector of them till it got too expensive on my pension.also a big libary of ship books.

  3. #33
    Senior Member brian daley's Avatar
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    Hey Liverbob, Bring 'em on!!! I look forward to seeing your pics very soon(but not all at once). I bet you have some that each and everyone of us has sailed on ;I'm agog !,
    BrianD

  4. #34
    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    Good one of the HERDSMAN there Brian, My brother was on her in 1948. I have saved it in my collection.
    Thanks fior that Trader and Liverbob.

    I have more than 1200 + SEA BREEZES, SHIPS, SHIPS MONTHLY, etc.
    The Sea Breeze Collection started in January 1950.
    Last edited by captain kong; 02-13-2009 at 12:06 PM.

  5. #35
    Captain Kong captain kong's Avatar
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    I have been aboard this famous old ship many times, in San Diego, Cal. My son lived in dago and I always went aboard every time I visited. She still sails every year into the Pacific.
    If only someone had preserved the Vindicatrix. we could still sail her, what an experience.
    The Star of India was found in a delapidated condition by Alan Villiars, and helped to kick start the preservation.

    This information is off the San Diego Museum.site. thank you.

    The Star of India is the world's oldest active ship. She began her life on the stocks at Ramsey Shipyard in the Isle of Man in 1863. Iron ships were experiments of sorts then, with most vessels still being built of wood. Within five months of laying her keel, the ship was launched into her element. She bore the name Euterpe, after the Greek goddess of music.
    Euterpe was a full-rigged ship and would remain so until 1901, when the Alaska Packers Association rigged her down to a barque, her present rig. She began her sailing life with two near-disastrous voyages to India. On her first trip she suffered a collision and a mutiny. On her second trip, a cyclone caught Euterpe in the Bay of Bengal, and with her topmasts cut away, she barely made port. Shortly afterward, her first captain died on board and was buried at sea.

    After such a hard luck beginning, Euterpe settled down and made four more voyages to India as a cargo ship. In 1871 she was purchased by the Shaw Savill line of London and embarked on a quarter century of hauling emigrants to New Zealand, sometimes also touching Australia, California and Chile. She made 21 circumnavigations in this service, some of them lasting up to a year. It was rugged voyaging, with the little iron ship battling through terrific gales, "labouring and rolling in a most distressing manner," according to her log.

    The life aboard was especially hard on the emigrants cooped up in her 'tween deck, fed a diet of hardtack and salt junk, subject to mal-de-mer and a host of other ills. It is astonishing that their
    death rate was so low. They were a tough lot, however, drawn
    from the working classes of England, Ireland and Scotland, and
    most went on to prosper in New Zealand.




    EUTERPE and now the STAR OF INDIA,
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  6. #36
    Senior Member brian daley's Avatar
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    The first vessel is the Goth,built in Belfast in 1902.She is shown in the colours of the Union Castle line.

    The second is the Nam Sang,built on the Clyde in 1893 for Jardine Mathesons Indo China Steam Navigation Co. She traded out in the Far East between Calcutta and all ports on the way to Japan (what a run that would have been heaven or what?).
    BrianD
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  7. #37
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    First up we have the Federal Steam Navigation's "Somerset" her classic lines show her beauty at its best. Built by John Browns on the Clyde in 1903 she sailed on the Australian and New Zealand trade until the Great War. She was torpedoed off Ushant on the 28th July 1917.

    The Cunard liner "Saxonia" was built in 1900 and is easily recognisable by the size of her huge funnel,towering 106 feet above the main deck. She is shown in American waters,see the Stars and Stripes on her foremast.
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  8. #38
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    This is a wonderful painting by Frank Mason R.I.,it is called Oil on Troubled Waters and shows an old coal burning tanker in a storm at sea. It was painted before WW11 and there is no name for the ship.
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  9. #39
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    I had to post this one just to give you folks who have not been to sea a glimpse of what a storm can look like from aboard ship. This is an old colourgravure and it was taken from the promenade deck of the Norddeutscher Liner "Bremen". This deck is 38 foot above the water line and the gale was a force 8 with the velocity of the waves running at between 34 to 40 knots. Bracing what?
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  10. #40

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    The Wavertree, 2170 tons, built in Southampton in 1885 and operated by the Leyland Line in Liverpool. All their ships were named after suburbs of the city. I took this in the South Street Seaport museum in New York last summer. Picture is a bit cropped but when I moved back to get it all in you couldn't read the name on the bow.
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  11. #41
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    Nice picture birdseye,I have long wanted to visit the South Street Maritime museum. Have you got any more pics, and is that brooklyn Bridge we can see through the rigging?

  12. #42
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    Two ship from our Imperial past, the P,&O. liners, S.S. Narkunda and S.S. Maloja. Built for the India ,China and Australia trade, they would have carried the people who ran our overseas Empire, from the solar topeed ,walrus mopustached officers of the Indian Army to the memsahibs who ran the hospitals ,schools and other necessary services. There would have been troops to man the frontiers and emigrants to build up our dominions, I cannot look at these ships without thinking of how Britain predominated world affairs in those long ago days. "Another brandy Colonel?" " I don't mind if I do!!"
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  13. #43

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    Sorry Brian, that was the only shot I got there. It was our last day and it was a really fleeting visit. The museum is really well done, like everything else in the city. I had time to grab this postcard which I've scanned. The ship behind the Wavertree there is the Peking, which has quite a history too. I was interested to see just where all those thousands of voyages from the Princes Dock finished up. I hope to go back in the not too distant future and, having done all the major sights, I can concentrate on places like this.

    Yes, that's Brooklyn Bridge behind the museum.
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  14. #44
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    Wonderful shot birdseye, I had a painting on a plate of the Peking and the Taipei ,two of the tea clippers, it showed them in full sail scudding up the channel in a bid to be first home with the tea. What graceful vessels they were. Thank you,
    BrianD.

  15. #45

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    A few years ago I watched the Gorch Fock going out of the Mersey and what a fantastic sight it was when it dropped all sail and took off like a greyhound. There's a really good account of life on a sailing ship called "The Last Grain Race" by travel writer Eric Newby, who sailed on the Moshulu in the 1930s. A tough life.

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