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Thread: The Bookshop Philip Son and Nephew

  1. #31
    Senior Member kevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Thanks, all. Nice memories. I still have the receipt from Philip, Son and Nephew for some copies of my 1976 poetry chapbook, Toxteth, that I placed there back then. I also remember Waterston's at the top of Berry Street near St. Luke's Church . . . and a Waterston (I think the bookseller's son) was a classmate of mine when I attended Rose Lane School, Mossley Hill, in the 1960's.

    Chris
    Hi Chris,
    I drank in the Rose of Mossley from around 1969-1974. Couple of the lads I drank with were called McGinn. There were three in total - Alan, Graham and Mick. There was a couple of years between each of them and I think they all went to Rose Lane School. Ring any bells?


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  2. #32
    Newbie ticketyboo's Avatar
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    Yes, I remember Philip Son and Nephew very well. It also sold stationery, and I recall a glue they had in a round pot with a green lid called "Polywog", which was used at the school I used to go to. The school also bought all its stationery from there.

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    Senior Member lindylou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ticketyboo View Post
    Yes, I remember Philip Son and Nephew very well. It also sold stationery, and I recall a glue they had in a round pot with a green lid called "Polywog", which was used at the school I used to go to. The school also bought all its stationery from there.
    I remember that glue in junior school, didn't it small like coconut ?

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    Senior Member az_gila's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindylou View Post
    I remember that glue in junior school, didn't it smell like coconut ?
    Yes... and it didn't taste too bad either...

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    Senior Member Doris Mousdale's Avatar
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    Nearly in tears reading about Philip Son and Nephew and then a brilliant reply by az-gilla and i burst out laughing. Philip Son and Nephew was fantastic, bibles ( for school prize giving) Janes Fighting Ships and the latest fiction all in little nooks and crannies.Parker pens and geometry sets laid out on tables.
    A friend of mine Dave Greeney worked in Philips from the age of 15 and has just retired here in NZ after 50 years working with books. I worked in Dillons when it was Hudsons and then it changed to Dillons before becoming Waterstones.
    The original Waterstones was further up Bold St. Dillons was in Cripps building next to the Gas Showroom ( a haven for buskers-we used to pay them NOT to sing Annies Song) It was the oldest cast iron fronted shop in the country.Up on the 4th and 5th floors it had been a Cashmere Shawl warehouse and the floors were worn into grooves where the girls used to sit and finish the shawls off. It was also haunted and many of the staff saw the lady in grey on the back stairs which led down into Slater St. There was a beautiful brass plate with Cripps engraved on it on at the back door which disappeared one night in the 80s.Parry's Bookshop up by the Phil was excellent and then there was a paperback shop top of Bold St( Parrys Paperbacks),by Stan's model shop and the Virgin music. Sherratt and Hughes in Central Station even Lewis' had a good book department aswell as the University Bookshop. Charles Wilson's son started me off in bookselling back in the 70s and now I have my own independent bookshop. There was also a Wilson's facing the Bluecoat.
    News from Nowhere was another good one and facing St Lukes church by Tabac there was the Lefty bookshop that sold amazing political postcards from around the world and traditional Russian childrens books.That is the real street culture. We could sell Ragged Trousered Philanthropist by the dozen, Her Benny and then the very latest in fiction. The last signing session I did there was Bob Geldoff but the best was Kenneth Williams

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    Senior Member lindylou's Avatar
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    Interesting post Doris

  8. #38
    Senior Member Doris Mousdale's Avatar
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    I sold more poetry books on a wet Wednesday afternoon in Dillons Bold St than I have done in a year in other bookstores.We had the Athena Gallery the SPCK Bookshop up on the first floor,dog collars and communion wine on sale, you could buy law books medical textbooks and it was one of the first shops to sell computers, Sinclairs and Amstrad and a few others but most of them got nicked even though they were all alarmed.One lunchtime we came back to find 12 keyboards missing from the computer display at the back of the ground floor and all the 12 screens scrolling F*** O** over and over again- and no-one saw it happen and we didn't know how to clear the screens. Any football book for sale we just had to pin up the poster and keep the books under the counter or they would magically disappear only to reappear in the pub round the corner in Hanover St.The best thing was the enthusiasm of the customers always looking for the next good read, used to check out people in Kardomah cafe to see what the arty set were reading over their coffees-that would be the next bestseller guaranteed.Hope the new Waterstones lives up to your expectations.

  9. #39
    Newbie Karen B.'s Avatar
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    Default Philip, Son and Nephew

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    Actually, it was much bigger than it looked from the outside and was spread over three (?) floors.
    It was demolished and Wetherspoons built premises on the site.

    Nice to read a bit of family history - Thank you!
    Karen (Philip) B.

  10. #40
    Newbie giropay's Avatar
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    I had a holiday job in Philip Son and Nephew in 1971 in the Technical and Maps dept.

    One of the owners/directors was John Philip who had an office tucked away somewhere in the building - he seemed to be about 80 and was rarely seen.He was always referred reverentially to as 'Mr John'.Very reminiscent of Grace Brothers.

    It was a marvellous shop and the staff were incredibly helpful and provided an excellent service to customers.

    Happy memories....

  11. #41
    Newbie Karen B.'s Avatar
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    Wow. That was my grandfather I never met. Sounds like my dad. John also had a son Peter - do you know if he was involved in the business? He was born in 1935 so could still be around..

    Karen

  12. #42
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    I remember PS&N well myself and I well recall the narrow wooden stairs.

    Now can someone confirm if my mind is playing tricks.

    Upstairs did they sell model railway equipment in the 1960s?
    (No I am not getting mixed up with Lucas' Hobbies which did sell model railways upstairs.)

    I recall a table in the middle of one of the upstairs floors with Hornby Dublo eequipment on display in the late 1960s. This was a time when Meccano, makers of Hornby Dublo had been taken over by Lines' Bros Rovex-Triang group and they were phasing out the old Hornby Dublo two and three rail systems in favour of their own products.

    Just wondering if anyone else remembers this?

    John

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