YO! Liverpool
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 6 of 10

Thread: The Irish Famine

  1. #1
    Senior Member gregs dad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    kirkby
    Posts
    2,658
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default The Irish Famine

    [IMG][/IMG]
    This memorial is in St Lukes garden. According to the inscription on the tablet on the side of the picture, Ireland is the only place in Europe that has less people living there now than in 1845


    ADVERTISING


    THE BEST VITAMIN FOR MAKING FRIENDS ? B.1

    My Flickr site: www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/

    http://flickrhivemind.net/User/exacta2a

  2. #2
    chippie
    Guest chippie's Avatar

    Default

    cracker photo gregsdad, makes you think doesn,t it

  3. #3
    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,973
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Blog Entries
    22

    Default

    There is a plaque on the gates of Clarence Dock. It states that 1.3 million Irish entered the port via those gates during the famine. Most immediately left via Waterloo Dock on the American packets or went to London and Manchester. Liverpool simply could not accommodate them all.
    The new Amsterdam at Liverpool?
    Save Liverpool Docks and Waterways - Click

    Deprived of its unique dockland waters Liverpool
    becomes a Venice without canals, just another city, no
    longer of special interest to anyone, least of all the
    tourist. Would we visit a modernised Venice of filled in
    canals to view its modern museum describing
    how it once was?


    Giving Liverpool a full Metro - CLICK
    Rapid-transit rail: Everton, Liverpool & Arena - CLICK

    Save Royal Iris - Sign Petition

  4. #4
    Senior Member H_Asbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    97
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterways View Post
    There is a plaque on the gates of Clarence Dock. It states that 1.3 million Irish entered the port via those gates during the famine. Most immediately left via Waterloo Dock on the American packets or went to London and Manchester. Liverpool simply could not accommodate them all.
    Liverpool and Philadelphia at Midcentury

    Liverpool and Philadelphia played similar roles in their respective worlds.[23] Second in size and importance to the dominant metropolises of London and New York, they both enjoyed international prominence as major ports and commercial centers. Between 1831 and 1851 the borough of Liverpool's population jumped from 165,175 to 375,955. In the same two decades Philadelphia County's population more than kept pace, rising from 167,751 to 408,742.[24] Both cities, too, had large Irish populations dating from well before the potato famine. By midcentury nearly 72,000 Philadelphians (17.6 percent) and 84,000 Liverpudlians (22.3 percent) were Irish-born immigrants.[25] Philadelphia's population was otherwise more demographically diverse than its English counterpart, with nearly 50,000 (12 percent of the total population) non-Irish immigrants, including 22,750 (5.6 percent) Germans and 17,500 (4.3 percent) English natives. Over 10 percent of Liverpool's residents were non-Irish immigrants, but the vast majority of these were from neighboring Wales (20,262, 5.4 percent) and Scotland (14,059, 3.7 percent), with a mere 1.4 percent from other nations. Nearly 5 percent (19,761) of Philadelphians were African American, giving the city a racial diversity almost completely absent in Liverpool.[26]

    Even in the mid 1800's almost a quarter of Liverpools population was of Irish decent, after the Famine this rose even further, just look in the phone book today for Proof!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,973
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Blog Entries
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by H_Asbo View Post
    Even in the mid 1800's almost a quarter of Liverpools population was of Irish decent, after the Famine this rose even further, just look in the phone book today for Proof!
    Nice figures and how the two cities paralled each other. The figures are to around 1850. Liverpool's population rose dramatically after 1850 as it became an economic powerhouse. They came in from everywhere and from places like Scandinavia and Germany, etc, and the Welsh were far more prominent after 1850, as were just about everyone else. With 1/3 of the churches in Toxteth being Welsh and the countless Welsh street names all over the city - that tells you something it itself. Liverpool pre-WW1 had a large German population in direct German and of German decent - the Liver bird was designed by a German. The Irish did not figure that well in the post 1850 immigration to the city.

    As most are ex directory these day, don't go by the phone book. Many may have Irish names, but the other sides of the family will invariably be from elsewhere. The people in the city freely mixed.

    Many on this forum appear obsessed at perpetuating a myth that we are of predominantly Irish decent. We are not!!!! See the real picture of the city. We are very mixed with the Irish influx laying around third after the English and Welsh - which is significant in itself.
    Last edited by Waterways; 02-03-2008 at 09:09 PM.
    The new Amsterdam at Liverpool?
    Save Liverpool Docks and Waterways - Click

    Deprived of its unique dockland waters Liverpool
    becomes a Venice without canals, just another city, no
    longer of special interest to anyone, least of all the
    tourist. Would we visit a modernised Venice of filled in
    canals to view its modern museum describing
    how it once was?


    Giving Liverpool a full Metro - CLICK
    Rapid-transit rail: Everton, Liverpool & Arena - CLICK

    Save Royal Iris - Sign Petition

  6. #6
    Senior Member phredd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    runcorn
    Posts
    359
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I am supprised that no one has picked up on this photo. >>>>>>>
    It has been moved from its original location to make way for the New Museum.
    Last time I was down there I could not find the Blue Plaque.

    Phredd
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	riverside_walk Fimine.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	71.3 KB 
ID:	5067  
    In the days when we had nothing we had fun.
    If tomorrow starts without me, remember I was here.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My Irish Pride
    By Gnomie in forum Cultures and Communities in Liverpool
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 07-31-2008, 10:10 PM
  2. Irish Famine
    By Waterways in forum Liverpool History and Heritage Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 04-16-2008, 11:24 PM
  3. Are the Irish getting remembered?
    By Gnomie in forum European Capital of Culture 2008
    Replies: 277
    Last Post: 02-02-2008, 04:25 AM
  4. Irish Centre
    By Kev in forum Liverpool City Center - Outer Zones
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 12-29-2007, 07:45 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

For daily updates, to support us further or to join in the conversation: Follow us on Twitter @YOLiverpool / Like our Facebook Page: @LiverpoolInPictures / Join the Facebook Group: Liverpool In Pictures (YO! Liverpool)

YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain. If you like the website, please donate via PayPal!