YO! Liverpool
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 121 to 150 of 152

Thread: The Liverpool Welsh ( A happy thread )

  1. #121
    Senior Member Samp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Live Tuebrook area.
    Posts
    409
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark R View Post
    I think it is also legal for an Englishman to shoot a Scotsman (with a bow and arrow) if he is found within the walled city of York.

    My family on my dad's side are Scottish, on my mam's side (mam being of Welsh origin) are welsh.

    There is nothing down for me if I visit Chester and they find out.

    I do like a pint in the Boot.


    I have posted this to keep the thread going!

  2. #122
    Senior Member lindylou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,677
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    I've probably got this wrong - but I heard a strange little myth about the clock in Chester being built to face the other way from Wales - so the Welsh couldn't see the time !! Ha! Have you heard that one ?

  3. #123
    Senior Member knowhowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chester UK
    Posts
    256
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lindylou View Post
    I've probably got this wrong - but I heard a strange little myth about the clock in Chester being built to face the other way from Wales- so the Welsh couldn't see the time !! Ha! Have you heard that one ?
    You're quite right. If you look up at the Town Hall tower, there's a clock on three of its four sides- but the side facing Wales has none!
    It gives rise to the old saying that "Chester folk wouldn't give the time of day to the Welsh".
    Charming eh?
    Chester: a Virtual Stroll Around the Walls-
    http://www.chesterwalls.info

    The Liverpool Gallery-
    http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/liverpool.html

    The Chester Shop
    http://www.thechestershop.com


    Chester & Liverpool Guided Walks
    http://www.chesterwalls.info/guidedwalks.html

  4. #124
    Senior Member Howie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kensington, Liverpool
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,196
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Welsh to honour a city success story
    Jun 14 2008
    by Catherine Jones, Liverpool Echo

    ONE of the most famous members of Liverpool’s Welsh community is being celebrated in a special exhibition to mark Capital of Culture.

    The links between Liverpool and North Wales will be highlighted in the six-week exhibition at the Welsh Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) highlighting department store founder Owen Owen.

    Arts Council of Wales is backing the project which is being put together with the help of the Owen family.

    Owen Owen’s great, great grand-daughter Genevieve Raw-Rees, a student in Liverpool, said: “The idea for the exhibition came about because the Arts Council Wales circulated information about Liverpool as the Capital of Culture and invited arts organisations to take part.

    “MoMA Wales was interested and said yes.

    “I live just off London Road opposite the site of the original Owen Owen store, and I’m delighted to have been asked to help put the exhibition together.”

    Owen Owen was born in Machynlleth, the home of MoMA Wales, in 1847 and arrived in Liverpool in 1868 hoping to make his fortune.

    The 21-year-old had spent several years working for his uncle’s drapery store in Bath.

    He had £300 in his pocket and having already discovered trade was booming in Liverpool on an earlier visit, decided it was a town of opportunity.

    Owen founded a small shop in London Road and, unable to afford any advertising, displayed a notice in the window saying: “This shop is opened to supply the public with the newest and best fancy goods at the lowest possible prices.”

    The exhibition runs at the Machynlleth museum, between Dolgellau and Aberystwyth, from July 28 to September 6.

    Source: Liverpool Echo

  5. #125
    Senior Member marky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,093
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    1881 Caergwrle Buildings, Wavertree Road/Thorburn Street. An early date-stone when compared with other major roads. I've seen other Welsh stones around, Bootle for example.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/25632502@N00/2681250581/

  6. #126
    Member redjed1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    childwall
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi, My mums mum was welsh (from Anglesey). Her family moved to Liverpool about 1900 and (from the 1891 census) her parents only spoke welsh, while their children were bilingual. I wonder how they got on with their Liverpool neighbours?

    They lived in Walton - were there "welsh" parts of Liverpool where they all lived? My (scouser) grandad used to stay with them and had to learn welsh to be able to speak with them.

    When I was small, my nan used to teach me a bit of welsh. I still feel an afinity with Wales, especially when driving along their roads with the signs written in welsh and english. Good on them for insisting on keeping the welsh language going.

  7. #127
    Senior Member squiggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    204
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gnomie View Post
    Llanfyllin

    Can anyone tell me any info on it please.

    I have found out that my great grandfather was born there in 1880
    any ideas what kind of industry was in the area at that time.

    any pics of the area now?

    cheers

    Tony
    Ohhh me too !, we could be related !

  8. #128
    Senior Member squiggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    204
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    The other side of my family come from Amylch spelt Amlach on the 1851census everyone must know them the name was Thomas Hughes LOL !, seems to live in 8 "Tclyue" its hard to make out !.

  9. #129
    Newbie pennymeadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default VARIED FAMILY

    Hi all, i'm a new member to your site and found you all by accident browsing & decided to join you. I have Scottish family on my Mother's side who were known as the fighting Mactaggarts in Scotland. They were renowned Barefist fighters who had a reputation for many years as people not to mess with. My mum wondered why they weren't mentioned very often at family gatherings, . My Dad's side who were called Parry came to Liverpool during the early years of the 20th C from a little Welsh village next to Ffestiniog and lived in St Domingo Road untill their deaths. They had 9 children who were all born in Everton and who all worked and stayed in the Liverpool areas. My Auntie Elsie worked at Hendersons at the time of the big fire.

  10. #130
    Senior Member shytalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pocahontas.Arkansas. U.S.A.
    Posts
    546
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Welcome to the forum Pennymeadow. Are you in Liverpool?.
    You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else.
    Winston Churchill

  11. #131
    Senior Member lindylou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,677
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi and welcome to the forum. There's lots of pics of Wales here too - -

    http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/pla...095-wales.html

  12. #132
    Newbie pennymeadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks for the welcome. I'm in sunny Skem (Skelmersdale). Love going to Liverpool, & travel there whenever i get the chance. Mainly visit Fairfield as i have an Auntie who has lived in the same house for 71 years, since she was 10.

  13. #133
    Newbie pennymeadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by shytalk View Post
    Welcome to the forum Pennymeadow. Are you in Liverpool?.
    Noticed your American address Shytalk. Are you an expat yourself?. I have alot of family in Columbus, Indiana and Kentucky.They are very Southern in their accents and it was my Mum's Mum who went over to America as a Gi bride from Liverpool.

  14. #134
    Newbie pennymeadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by lindylou View Post
    Hi and welcome to the forum. There's lots of pics of Wales here too - -

    http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/pla...095-wales.html
    Hi Lindylou, i have enjoyed looking through the forum containing all the wonderful photos that people have taken on their travels around Wales. They are stunning.

  15. #135
    Senior Member shytalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pocahontas.Arkansas. U.S.A.
    Posts
    546
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pennymeadow View Post
    Noticed your American address Shytalk. Are you an expat yourself?. I have alot of family in Columbus, Indiana and Kentucky.They are very Southern in their accents and it was my Mum's Mum who went over to America as a Gi bride from Liverpool.
    I'm in northeast Arkansas, I moved here from Florida in 2006 when I retired. I lived in Florida for 24 years but I am still pure scouse. Can't see any reason to get rid of an accent that is so good.


    ADVERTISING


    You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else.
    Winston Churchill

  16. #136
    Newbie pennymeadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Totally agree Shytalk, Scouse is a great & friendly accent. Good on you for keeping your accent for all these years. By now there must be a slight twang of American in there by now though surely?. You probably sound Scouse to Americans but American to us LOL. It's facinating that you are the other side of the world but can keep in touch with everything on this site.

  17. #137
    Senior Member shytalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pocahontas.Arkansas. U.S.A.
    Posts
    546
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pennymeadow View Post
    By now there must be a slight twang of American in there by now though surely?. You probably sound Scouse to Americans but American to us LOL
    YERWOT?
    You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else.
    Winston Churchill

  18. #138
    The Scarlet Pimple anonymouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Klondyke Bill, Mayor of Bootle.

    This may be of interest to those that missed it the first time around:?

    Llwydiarth Fawr on Anglesey - home of the Mayor of Bootle
    Never put anyone on a pedestal... THEY'LL LOOK DOWN ON YOU!

  19. #139
    Senior Member lindylou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,677
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Thanks for that link - it's an interesting site.

  20. #140
    Member gerry_2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    37
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shytalk View Post
    YERWOT?
    Quite a nice cultured scouse accent Shy is that for the benefit of your American friends. Where I come from its YERWO. In one of your previous threds you wrote about your shop in Gramby St and the cobblers shop, I knew the chap in the cobblers he was an old friend of mine Charlie Riely aka (Ike). At that time I managed the Vine Hotel on the corner of Vine and Faulkner streets. That was in the early sixtys.

  21. #141
    Member Blue70's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Smile

    I have Welsh ancestors going back to the 1800s. I have an ancestor from Overton in what was then Flintshire, probably another that later married into that family who was called Jones and an ancestor from Laugharne in South Wales.

    Col

  22. #142
    Liverpool New Yorker! Ronijayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    541
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Don't think I have seen this thread before. Do I qualify to post (if I have not already, haven't read back very far!)

    My Grandmother was of Welsh heritage.

    We went to Wales so many weekends every year. Most of my childhood photos are taken in Wales.

    I belong to the St. David's society here in Manhattan and I am on the list for Welsh Assembly events. Last year Aeronwy Thomas came to read her own and her father Dylan's poetry. I had a few drinks with her and her husband, she said she gives Welsh classes at home. Sadly she died recently.

    Cymru am byth

    Roni
    Earth is the insane asylum for the universe.

  23. #143
    Member Blue70's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Smile

    Dylan Thomas has links to Laugharne in South Wales where one of my Welsh ancestors came from.

    Col

  24. #144
    George
    Guest George's Avatar

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by taffy View Post
    Mark, have a look at the book " Building the Industrial City" edited by Martin Doughty, pub 1986. It has a very interesting chapter on " The Welsh Influence on the Building Industry in Victorian Liverpool". It seems most of the 100,000 houses built in Liverpool in the 19th C were built mainly because of Welsh initiative and enterprise using building materials from North Wales
    Hell! no wonder me house is in a sorry state.

    I was under the impression all building materials came from local quarry's in Liverpool,reason being it was cheaper to extract and transport Sandstone from them.

  25. #145
    Senior Member Howie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kensington, Liverpool
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,196
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Liverpool evacuees

    Woman's memories of Second World War impact on North Wales
    Sep 1 2009
    by Andrew Gilpin, Daily Post

    IT was the moment the nation had dreaded: On September 3, 70 years ago, Britain was left with no choice but to declare war on Germany.

    Thus began the deadliest military conflict in history in which more than 60 million people were killed. A terrible era which helped shape the modern Britain and Europe of today.

    Among the horror came unforgettable tales of courage and stoicism: Dunkirk, the D-Day landings, the Blitz.

    When war was declared, its impact on North Wales was immediate. The sky did not fill with enemy planes nor did bombs rain down.

    But a pervading sense of fear bordering on panic set in everywhere. And in what proved ? at first ? to be a huge over-reaction, North Wales was swamped with thousands of evacuees pouring in from the Liverpool area.

    Most were children, wrenched away from their families, not knowing where they were being sent.

    Local people did their bit and helped look after youngsters. Yet many soon went back when the expected bomb attacks on Liverpool failed initially to materialise.

    Laurette Danson MBE, a lifelong resident of Colwyn Bay, has good reason to be upset.

    ?Many evacuees went back to Liverpool. It was very sad because they went back to the bombing,? she says. ?We had five evacuees in our house ? five of the little things. A brother and a sister were taken back by their mother and father and we heard that they were killed by a bomb a fortnight after returning.

    ?The youngest of the five children was seven, and there was a little girl of five. She looked like butter wouldn?t melt in her mouth but she ran the gang. Bless her, she went back and she was killed.

    ?The parents, they sent these children so they would be safe but then there are sitting at home and thinking ?I want them back and we will all be together?. They either came or sent for them to go back and back they went.?

    Mrs Danson, now in her 80s and still an active member of Colwyn Bay Town Council, can clearly remember the day war broke out.

    ?My parents and my elder sister and I were sitting in our drawing room listening to the wireless. Mr Chamberlain came on and he said that the country was at war. It was an awful thing to hear this country was at war. My parents, they were even more distressed. I was a teenager at the time.

    ?This town was inundated with evacuees from Liverpool and the people of Colwyn Bay received them into their homes. It was the law of the land and you had to take them in.

    ?They sent trainload after trainload of children coming in. My sister and I went along and met the trains and helped take the little ones to people?s houses,? recalls Mrs Danson.

    Months later, as the bombs started to fall on Liverpool, she looked across the sea to a city on fire.

    Then there were the little things you would notice ? for instance, iron railings around houses taken away to be smelted down for ammunition.

    Amid the gloom was a ray of sunshine. Soldier Anthony Danson was stationed nearby and was befriended by her family. She got on well with him and he became her future husband with whom she had four children.

    A sense of defiance in the face of evil has never left Mrs Danson.

    ?This was our land. It was awful, but we were all very patriotic. That was the wonderful part about it, we were as one. Sadly I don?t see it today,? she says.

    ?We all stood together to protect this land and it meant something to us, Britain. It didn?t matter whether you were Liberal or Labour, you stood together.?

    Major Basil Heaton, farmer of the Rhual estate near Mold, played a key role in the Normandy landings on D-Day in 1944.

    He was the first off his landing craft on Gold Beach amid sniping and machine gun fire from defending Germans. It was the start of a long, exhausting but successful day in which his men helped secure the beachhead.

    But five years earlier, Major Heaton, now 85, was a schoolboy in his mid teens. He was back home from boarding school enjoying a summer holiday on September 3.

    ?I remember it quite clearly. It was a lovely, sunny day. We heard the announcement in the library. We all said good Lord, we were frightened the bombs would come straight down.

    ?That afternoon, my father and mother started packing. My father went back to the Royal Navy in Liverpool, from which he had retired.

    ?My mother went to Prestatyn to command a company of the Woman?s Auxiliary Territorial Service and my brother and I were rather left on our own. We were at home because it was the summer holidays but we then returned to boarding school.

    ?Within a few days or weeks around eight to 10 evacuees arrived from Liverpool, although I think they went back after a few weeks. They didn?t like it at all. They weren?t country people, they wanted to go back.?

    But the Heatons? large farmhouse wasn?t left alone for long. It soon become a land army hostel with Army girls living there for the rest of the war ?taking over half the house,? recalls Major Heaton.

    ?I had no doubt I would follow them. When I left school I joined up straightaway. I felt positive about it. It had to be done. The country pulled together. Whether it would pull together now I don?t know. There was a terrific feeling of comradeship.?

    Derrick Pratt, a North Wales historian now living in Welsh Frankton, grew up in Wrexham.

    His first memory of the war as a youngster of 12 is that of his father leaving and going off to fight.

    His dad was wounded in the arm during the D-day landings, but at least he survived, many school pupils were to lose their father in the fighting.

    The Wrexham area was relatively unscathed but the fear was still strong, and Mr Pratt recalls how some would leave their homes to go out into open countryside to sleep under the hedgerows at night, where they believed they would be safer.

    ?I became the man of the household and had to cope with official instructions ? stuff that came through the letterbox on how to make your house gas proof, and how to strengthen bedroom ceilings.

    ?It was completely unrealistic. There was great joy when we got our own gas masks, but we had a lot of problems with the baby gas mask for my younger brother.

    ?I learned to dig for victory in the school gardens, and everybody had allotments. The back gardens were dug up and I remember planting out our back garden.?

    Mr Pratt helped out building an air raid shelter near his home. We didn?t have a wheelbarrow of our own so I sawed my sister?s pram into half and used it to move the bricks from a cottage demolished in Market Street, Wrexham. In the end we only used it a couple of times.?

    Looking back on a conflict which began 70 years ago now, Derrick Pratt expresses some surprise that we managed to win.

    ?We had a First World War mentality,? he says. ?It took a long time to get our act together.?

    Perhaps it was, in the words of Roosevelt?s secretary of state Cordell Hull, the British ?indomitable spirit? which ultimately ensured our victory.

    Source: Daily Post North Wales

  26. #146
    Senior Member taffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,323
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Hell! no wonder me house is in a sorry state.

    I was under the impression all building materials came from local quarry's in Liverpool,reason being it was cheaper to extract and transport Sandstone from them.
    Most 19th C property in Liverpool was of course largely built in brick with the odd bit of sandstone for windows and lintels. Much of this brick came from Ruabon.

  27. #147
    Senior Member kevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Midlands
    Age
    69
    Posts
    879
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by taffy View Post
    Much of this brick came from Ruabon.
    Poland?
    ;-)

  28. #148
    Newbie johneowens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Owens family, Bibby's copper works, Garston

    Quote Originally Posted by taffy View Post
    Further to my earlier post about the John Bibby and Son Copper Works in Garston, here's an interesting gravestone in St Michael's Church, Garston. It marks the burial place of John Owens who died age 75 in 1896. He was born in North Wales and joined John Bibby and Son at their Seacombe copper works when it opened in 1836 at age 15. He stayed with John Bibby following their move to Garston in the mid 1860s. The works finally closed in the mid 1930s having been bought up and immediately closed by ICI metals.

    The Welsh families were housed in Bankfield Cottages, now called Brunswick St. These are some of the oldest properties in the "under the bridge" area of Garston. Bankfield house recently demolished was the Copper manager's House. Both the cottages and house were built by John Bibby of Allerton for his key workers.
    Dear Taffy

    There is another John Owens (my gggrandfather) buried at St Michael's. He was head copper rollerman at the Blackburne Street works until about 1917. His father David Owens was recruited by Bibby from Morriston, Swansea when the Poulton works was opened. When John retired, his son Peter Thomas Owens became head roller man. Both David and John and other family members are buried at St Michael's. If I could figure out how to attach photos to this message, I would send you photos.

    Best

    John

  29. #149
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,498
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    At the bottom of the quick reply box, there is a button that says Go Advanced.

    You can then attach pictures from your computer to the message.....

    Kev
    Liverpool in Pictures/ YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain.

    All server & domain costs are covered by myself & kind donations of individuals.

    If you like the website, please donatevia PayPal!




    Thank you


    Kev
    2005 - 2017

  30. #150
    Senior Member az_gila's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    603
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kevin View Post
    Poland?
    ;-)
    This BBC Liverpool Welsh story response says Buckley, near Mold -

    In Liverpool a lot of the older buildings are made from
    Welsh bricks and tiles. Mainly from Buckley. The Bricks were made in Buckley,
    then shipped to Liverpool, in some cases sent by rail. You can tell by the red
    brick and the print on bricks. As a proud Buckley mon, it's always nice to see
    where my hometown bricks went.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The way we used to be thread
    By Kev in forum Liverpool Memories
    Replies: 283
    Last Post: 03-29-2011, 01:32 PM
  2. Welsh Presbyterian Church,Liverpool,Jan 10.
    By wherever i may roam in forum Buildings and Structures
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-26-2010, 09:09 AM
  3. The Liverpool Irish ( A Happy Thread )
    By Gnomie in forum Cultures and Communities in Liverpool
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-03-2008, 12:50 PM
  4. The Liverpool Scottish ( a happy thread )
    By Gnomie in forum Cultures and Communities in Liverpool
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-01-2008, 02:45 PM
  5. Welsh builders of Liverpool 4.
    By Ged in forum Liverpool Streets and Areas
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-31-2007, 12:13 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

For daily updates, to support us further or to join in the conversation: Follow us on Twitter @YOLiverpool / Like our Facebook Page: @yoliverpoolpics / Join the Facebook Group: YO! Liverpool Pictures

× Thanks for coming to the web site. Support our future by turning off your Ad-Blocker or consider a donation via PayPal or Credit Card!