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Thread: Netherfield road religion

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    Member johno's Avatar
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    Default Netherfield road religion

    Does anybody know. If the Protestant population of everton where Irish immigrants from the famine of 1846 like their catholic counterparts in Scotland road.
    Or were they Liverpool born?


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    Protestants in the Everton area were mostly born in Britain. Irish Protestants settled in the city but they never formed as a core element of any community like the Irish Catholic communities in north Liverpool. My Irish Protestant ancestors settled in Great Howard Street where most people were from an Irish Catholic background.

    If you are wondering about the roots of Orangeism in Everton the Orange Order was introduced into the city a long time before the famine and it was most likely introduced by Orangemen from other towns. Manchester Orangemen were believed to have organised the first known march in Liverpool in 1819 which ended in a riot.

    There was apparently a lodge in Liverpool in 1815 but by 1830 there were only three. No notable local figures were involved in the 1819 march the treasurer of the Manchester lodge took part and he was involved in the court case when rioters were prosecuted.

    A good history of Liverpool sectarianism is Frank Neal's "Sectarian Violence: The Liverpool Experience 1819-1914"


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    The first recorded Orange Parade in Liverpool took place in 1819 and was reported in Billinge's Advertiser after they were attacked by Catholics at the bottom of Dale St. The paper alos stated that the only earlier Orange parades had taken place in Bolton and Manchester.

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    The first major influx of people from Ireland into Liverpool was in 1798 after the turmoil of rebellion and martial law. It was the beginning of an era of migration in which Irish people came to Liverpool to settle, to do seasonal work or on their way to other countries. At the time of the famine in the 1840s the Irish famine migrants who settled in Liverpool found there well established Irish Catholic communities. Before the famine the percentage of Irish born people living in Liverpool was 17.3%.

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    I was born into a staunch Protestant family just off Netherfield Road, in those days it was Them and Us.
    When the 12th of July came around, each house would be dressed up with with home made flowers, the crepe paper being orange and purple.

    Us kids would help out, there was an air of excitement as the buntings were lifted up and stretched across the street.
    There was a party atmosphere because the whole street would take part.

    My dad played the big drum and Mam would use meltonian white cream to whiten the buckskin straps.
    all our shoes would get the same treatment, they would be put on the window sill to dry.
    Most of the families in our street would be taking part in the walk.

    On the morning of the 12th the girls would get dressed in their long dresses, the boys smartened up.

    At certain points along the walk there would be stones thrown at the walkers, the adults would move along side the juveniles so they would not be hurt or afraid, I witnessed pepper being thrown on one parade which was meant to distress the walkers.

    The bands would go on church parades through out the year, but the 12th was the special day.



    Last edited by lesley1; 12-16-2011 at 12:44 PM. Reason: added photo

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