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Thread: Rodney Street Area

  1. #61
    Senior Member Paul D's Avatar
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    I made up with this,another hanger on sent packing.

  2. #62
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
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    CALLS are being made for a multi-million pound restoration of one of Liverpool’s most historic streets.

    Rodney Street residents describe the 220-year-old thoroughfare, the birthplace of four-times prime minister William Gladstone, as an “underused resource” for the city.

    They believe the historic street could be a major tourist attraction at the heart of Liverpool’s Georgian quarter.

    Now they are calling for the road to be given similar treatment to nearby Hope Street, where £2m of improvements were carried out.

    And they say they are willing to plough some of their own money into enhancing the look of the street.

    Architects consulted by residents have suggested a series of improvements including:

    Building owners reinstating railings and iron balconies removed during World War II.

    Cutting the level of traffic, which often includes large lorries, by making the road one way and widening and improving the pavements.

    Reducing the level of the roadway, which has risen by a foot over the years.

    Installing effective and ‘sympathetic’ lighting.

    Replacing Victorian water mains.

    Residents believe public works and improvements to individual homes cost more than £3m.

    Dr Emlyn Williams, who heads the Rodney Street Association and has lived on the street for more than 20 years, said: “We want the area to become better known and play its part in showcasing Liverpool. Hope Street has come up very well.

    “This is parallel to Hope Street – if we could have an attractive street, with the legacy of Georgian heritage and with decent paving and lighting, that would be fantastic.”

    A city council spokesman said: “Officers attended a meeting with residents last week where there were very interesting discussions of their plans. A future meeting has been arranged for November 19.

    “We’d welcome investment by residents and the private sector in the street. There would be a significant cost implication of what they want to do and all agencies would have to look at it carefully.”

    He said any discussions about a one-way system would have to consider the knock-on effect on nearby streets.

    Birthplace and workplace of famous

    RODNEY Street was laid out in 1783 by William Roscoe, among others, and named after 18th century naval hero Lord Rodney.

    There are dozens of grade II listed buildings on the street along with the derelict grade II* listed Church of St Andrew, a landmark on the ECHO’s Stop the Rot buildings hit list.

    Number 62, built for John Gladstone in the early 1790s, was the birthplace of William Gladstone in 1809.

    Others born on the street include poet Arthur Clough (no. nine) and Cruel Sea author Nicholas Monsarrat (no. 11).

    Number 59 was home and studio to photographer Edward Chambré Hardman and is now owned by the National Trust.

    The country’s first public health officer Dr William Duncan lived at number 54 and writer and biographer Lytton Strachey at number 80.

    catherinejones@liverpoolecho.co.uk
    Liverpool in Pictures/ YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain.

    All server & domain costs are covered by myself & kind donations of individuals.

    If you like the website, please donatevia PayPal!




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    Kev
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  3. #63
    DaisyChains
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev View Post
    CALLS are being made for a multi-million pound restoration of one of Liverpool’s most historic streets.

    Rodney Street residents describe the 220-year-old thoroughfare, the birthplace of four-times prime minister William Gladstone, as an “underused resource” for the city.

    They believe the historic street could be a major tourist attraction at the heart of Liverpool’s Georgian quarter.

    Now they are calling for the road to be given similar treatment to nearby Hope Street, where £2m of improvements were carried out.

    And they say they are willing to plough some of their own money into enhancing the look of the street.

    Architects consulted by residents have suggested a series of improvements including:

    Building owners reinstating railings and iron balconies removed during World War II.

    Cutting the level of traffic, which often includes large lorries, by making the road one way and widening and improving the pavements.

    Reducing the level of the roadway, which has risen by a foot over the years.

    Installing effective and ‘sympathetic’ lighting.

    Replacing Victorian water mains.

    Residents believe public works and improvements to individual homes cost more than £3m.

    Dr Emlyn Williams, who heads the Rodney Street Association and has lived on the street for more than 20 years, said: “We want the area to become better known and play its part in showcasing Liverpool. Hope Street has come up very well.

    “This is parallel to Hope Street – if we could have an attractive street, with the legacy of Georgian heritage and with decent paving and lighting, that would be fantastic.”

    A city council spokesman said: “Officers attended a meeting with residents last week where there were very interesting discussions of their plans. A future meeting has been arranged for November 19.

    “We’d welcome investment by residents and the private sector in the street. There would be a significant cost implication of what they want to do and all agencies would have to look at it carefully.”

    He said any discussions about a one-way system would have to consider the knock-on effect on nearby streets.

    Birthplace and workplace of famous

    RODNEY Street was laid out in 1783 by William Roscoe, among others, and named after 18th century naval hero Lord Rodney.

    There are dozens of grade II listed buildings on the street along with the derelict grade II* listed Church of St Andrew, a landmark on the ECHO’s Stop the Rot buildings hit list.

    Number 62, built for John Gladstone in the early 1790s, was the birthplace of William Gladstone in 1809.

    Others born on the street include poet Arthur Clough (no. nine) and Cruel Sea author Nicholas Monsarrat (no. 11).

    Number 59 was home and studio to photographer Edward Chambré Hardman and is now owned by the National Trust.

    The country’s first public health officer Dr William Duncan lived at number 54 and writer and biographer Lytton Strachey at number 80.

    catherinejones@liverpoolecho.co.uk
    I am all for this!
    I completely agree. Not even nearly enough emphasis is on this fantastic street.

  4. #64
    Newbie gq2882's Avatar
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    Default Rodney Street

    I am currently undertaking an MSc at Liverpool John Moores University in Commercial Building Surveying. At the moment I am involved in a project to convert a property on Rodney Street. I am trying to find out information on other renovations/refurbishments on this street in order to determine the complexity of such a task and discover benefits and drawbacks of converting listed buildings.

    Any information that could be provided would be both beneficial and greatly appreciated.

  5. #65
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
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    LIVERPOOL has won an ownership battle in the high court to help preserve a derelict Stop the Rot landmark.

    The court has ruled against a challenge to the city over the ownership of St Andrew’s church in Rodney Street.

    Work will now finally be able to start on making the grade II listed church safe after a long legal battle.

    It is hoped the site will be open for people to visit during this year’s Heritage Open Days event in September.

    The council will now start talks with interested organisations to find a long-term use for it.

    Cllr Berni Turner, Liverpool’s executive member for the environment, said: “St Andrew’s has been a blight on this area of the city centre for far too long.

    “We’ve been extremely frustrated as there have been innumerable hearings about the ownership of the building but finally it appears that this legal saga is over.

    “We want to find the best use for this imposing building as soon as possible.”

    Three years ago council managers ring-fenced £250,000 to spend on repairs to the Georgian site.

    But they were unable to carry out any extensive work until ownership was resolved.

    The high court this week refused permission for an appeal to be heard against a land tribunal adjudicator’s ruling that the title of the 185-year-old church, in effect its ownership, rested with the city.

    The council bought the building in 2005 from architects who acquired it following legal action against its previous owners.

    This was disputed by the previous owners and led to the hearing.

    St Andrew’s and its neighbouring Sunday School have been empty since the early 1980s ,and in 1983 the church suffered major fire damage.

    Planning permission was granted in 1992 to convert it into a medical centre.

    But no progress was made and the building continued to deteriorate.

    In 2005 a body was discovered on scaffolding around the church.

    catherinejones@liverpoolecho.co.uk
    Liverpool in Pictures/ YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain.

    All server & domain costs are covered by myself & kind donations of individuals.

    If you like the website, please donatevia PayPal!




    Thank you


    Kev
    2005 - 2017

  6. #66
    DaisyChains
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev View Post
    LIVERPOOL has won an ownership battle in the high court to help preserve a derelict Stop the Rot landmark.

    The court has ruled against a challenge to the city over the ownership of St Andrew’s church in Rodney Street.

    Work will now finally be able to start on making the grade II listed church safe after a long legal battle.

    It is hoped the site will be open for people to visit during this year’s Heritage Open Days event in September.

    The council will now start talks with interested organisations to find a long-term use for it.

    Cllr Berni Turner, Liverpool’s executive member for the environment, said: “St Andrew’s has been a blight on this area of the city centre for far too long.

    “We’ve been extremely frustrated as there have been innumerable hearings about the ownership of the building but finally it appears that this legal saga is over.

    “We want to find the best use for this imposing building as soon as possible.”

    Three years ago council managers ring-fenced £250,000 to spend on repairs to the Georgian site.

    But they were unable to carry out any extensive work until ownership was resolved.

    The high court this week refused permission for an appeal to be heard against a land tribunal adjudicator’s ruling that the title of the 185-year-old church, in effect its ownership, rested with the city.

    The council bought the building in 2005 from architects who acquired it following legal action against its previous owners.

    This was disputed by the previous owners and led to the hearing.

    St Andrew’s and its neighbouring Sunday School have been empty since the early 1980s ,and in 1983 the church suffered major fire damage.

    Planning permission was granted in 1992 to convert it into a medical centre.

    But no progress was made and the building continued to deteriorate.

    In 2005 a body was discovered on scaffolding around the church.

    catherinejones@liverpoolecho.co.uk
    I can't say HOW PLEASED I AM ABOUT THIS! yay!

    It will be brilliant if they do open it up for the Heritage Open days, would love to get a good look at the pyramid!


    ADVERTISING



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