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Thread: Bricklaying Techniques!!!

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    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
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    Default Bricklaying Techniques!!!

    Looking at these walls in Newquay,along the dock rd,I wondered how they built such long stretches of wall,without expansion gaps? They still look in good condition,even now,and I'm guessing they have been up for best part of a century!?


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    Came fourth...now what? Oudeis's Avatar
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    No cement!
    Lime mortar does not 'set' so can absorb/go along with any movement.

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    Senior Member wsteve55's Avatar
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    Really! As you can see,there are no bulges,etc! So why dont they use this technique now,as you often see newish walls,that have already dropped out of line/true?

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    Came fourth...now what? Oudeis's Avatar
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    The pros and cons can be explained through Google, as usual...

    Use of Traditional Lime Mortars in Modern Brickwork

    One other reason is that (they say) a large mass of brickwork can more easily handle changes in temperature, +/-

    [the plain fact may be that cement is easier to work with]

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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Another reason why older traditional brickwork looks much better than today's examples - with expansion joints every couple of metres, usually gunked up with brick-coloured mastic!

    Also, older walls are at least likely to be one brick thick [215mm] rather than single leaf [102.5mm] cosmetic walls they throw up today.

    'Traditional Lime Mortars' - thanks I'll remember that in future.

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    Mossy Mossy's Avatar
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    If mortar keeps bricks to gether what keeps them apart

    Mossy
    You Can Lead a Horse To Water But You Cant Make Him Drink

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