YO! Liverpool
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 6 of 7

Thread: Daguerreotype ,s lets see them ,not tin or ambro types,

  1. #1
    Senior Member jacky gunnion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Blog Entries
    3

    Thumbs up Daguerreotype ,s lets see them ,not tin or ambro types,

    one of my collection of Daguerreotype,s ...louis Daguerre,


    ADVERTISING



  2. #2
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,504
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    very nice Jacky, what are they? what were they used for?
    YO! Liverpool has taken me 10 years to develop and maintain.
    If you like the website, please
    donate via PayPal!




    Thank you



  3. #3
    Senior Member jacky gunnion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    L’Atelier de l'artiste. An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre.


    The solar eclipse of July 28, 1851 was the first correctly exposed photograph of a solar eclipse, using the daguerreotype process.
    A daguerreotype (original French: daguerréotype) is one of the earliest photographic processes, developed by Louis Daguerre, in which the image is formed by amalgam i.e. a combination of mercury and silver. Mercury vapor from a pool of heated mercury is used to develop the plate that consists of a copper plate with a thin coating of silver rolled in contact that has previously been sensitised in iodine vapor (later sensitivity was increased by using the other halides - chlorine and bromine to form silver chloride and silver bromide crystals reducing the exposure time to about one minute.
    A thin image on the silver mirrored surface, the actual image is delicate and will be damaged if it is rubbed with the fingers. Daguerreotypes had to be mounted in airtight cases with a glass cover to prevent oxidation from the air and finger marks.
    When viewing the daguerreotype, a dark surface is reflected into the mirrored silver surface, and the reproduction of detail in sharp photographs is very good, partly because of the perfectly flat surface.

  4. #4
    Senior Member jacky gunnion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default daguerre case,

    L’Atelier de l'artiste. A daguerreotype by Daguerre.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Samp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Live Tuebrook area.
    Posts
    421
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jacky gunnion View Post
    L’Atelier de l'artiste. An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre.


    The solar eclipse of July 28, 1851 was the first correctly exposed photograph of a solar eclipse, using the daguerreotype process.
    A daguerreotype (original French: daguerréotype) is one of the earliest photographic processes, developed by Louis Daguerre, in which the image is formed by amalgam i.e. a combination of mercury and silver. Mercury vapor from a pool of heated mercury is used to develop the plate that consists of a copper plate with a thin coating of silver rolled in contact that has previously been sensitised in iodine vapor (later sensitivity was increased by using the other halides - chlorine and bromine to form silver chloride and silver bromide crystals reducing the exposure time to about one minute.
    A thin image on the silver mirrored surface, the actual image is delicate and will be damaged if it is rubbed with the fingers. Daguerreotypes had to be mounted in airtight cases with a glass cover to prevent oxidation from the air and finger marks.
    When viewing the daguerreotype, a dark surface is reflected into the mirrored silver surface, and the reproduction of detail in sharp photographs is very good, partly because of the perfectly flat surface.
    Thats a realy good piece of information is that Jacky and you said your school only produced doctors, lawyers and dentists, what about scientists?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Samp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Live Tuebrook area.
    Posts
    421
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    My first job was working in a photographers, well photo finishers realy. We used to develop peoples photos from the chemists' shops. I was in the darkroom all day processing film. never saw daylight for weeks on end during the winter.
    The boss owned a few firms, one being a firm called 'Panagraphs' who used to take school photos, the type you see in a long glass frame about three foot long. The photographer used to get the whole school to sit in an arc formation, he would have a camera with a long length of film inside. It would be set up in the centre of the group. The photo was all taken by a clockwork motor, which started at the lefthand side of the group and the camera would turn by the clockwork mechanism and end up finishing at the opposite end of the group. When the film was developed it would be used as a contact print to produce the final picture.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What types of nefarious activities could a wharfinger get caught up with in 1911?
    By Poolofliver in forum Liverpool's Maritime and Docklands
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-19-2010, 04:13 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

For daily updates, to support us further or to join in the conversation: Follow us on Twitter @YOLiverpool / Like our Facebook Page: @LiverpoolInPictures / Join the Facebook Group: Liverpool In Pictures (YO! Liverpool)

YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain. If you like the website, please donate via PayPal!