YO! Liverpool
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 6 of 15

Thread: Sir Edwin Lutyens' Roman Catholic Cathedral

  1. #1
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,504
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Sir Edwin Lutyens' Roman Catholic Cathedral

    A MODEL of the Liverpool cathedral that never was will be unveiled for the first time as the 13-year-long project to complete it comes to an end.



    The 500,000 creation - which stands 12ft wide, 17ft long and 12ft high - has been hailed as an architectural breakthrough. It is based on Sir Edwin Lutyens' original design for Liverpool's Roman Catholic Cathedral and is the completion of his first model for the building.

    The model will be revealed along with architectural plans for the cathedral at Liverpool's Walker Gallery in an exhibition entitled The Cathedral That Never Was: Lutyens' design for Liverpool.

    The plans for the cathedral, the brainchild of Sir Edward, were the most ambitious and extravagant Liverpool had ever seen.Had it gone ahead as he envisaged, the cathedral would have been built from pinkish-brown brick with bands of silver-grey granite and its breathtaking edifice would have have towered over the city.

    It would have been crowned with an enormous 510ft dome - twice the height of St Paul's cathedral in London - and be so tall it could easily have housed Big Ben inside the arches of the nave (the main aisle leading to the altar).

    It has taken 10 Liverpool craftsmen 13 years to finish the model that was started back in 1932 by a London-based company called Thorpwhich, at the time, was the country's leading model-making firm.

    For two years in the 1930s 12 workers crafted the model before the plans were abandoned.

    But in 1992 the idea came about for a conservation project to start on the model and, supported by a major grant of 268,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Merseyside craftsmen picked up where Thorp left off.The project has been a labour of love for Chris Moseley who headed the scheme and has seen it through from start to finish.

    Mr Moseley, head of models conservation at Liverpool's Conservation Centre, said: "This model is considered to be the greatest architectural model of the 20th Century.

    "It is a very important part of art and architectural history.

    "But it is also a very important and significant piece of Liverpool's social history in that this was the dream and aspiration of one of the minority communities in the city.


    ADVERTISING




    "The Catholic community wanted this cathedral but it was also Lutyens' dream to see it completed as well.

    "The interior of Lutyens' model was never finished. So we've done two things - first, we created the interior of the model and second, we carried on the work that had been started on the exterior."If he were alive today I think Lutyens would have been delighted to see the completed model of his plans because it was very much his idea. He wanted the cathedral as much as anyone else."

    Mr Moseley added: "It has been a privilege to work on this project and I've worked with some extremely talented Merseyside craftsmen. It's been superb because it is really the last of the great cathedral models." Construction for the full-sized cathedral started in 1933. But only the crypt of the vast building was completed before postwar austerity and a shortage of funds stopped work from continuing.

    A world-wide competition was launched in 1960 to find a new proposal and Sir Frederick Gibberd's design was chosen.As a result, the present modernistic concrete of Liverpool's Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ The King was opened on the Brownlow Hill Site in 1967.

    The completed model of the original cathedral plans will be displayed in an exhibition which starts in the new year.

    When displayed, the model will be divided in two so visitors will be able to get the first ever glimpse of what the inside of the cathedral would have looked like.

    A spokesman for National Museums Liverpool said: "This is the first opportunity to see the model fully restored with Lutyens' breathtaking interior."

    The exhibition hosted by the Walker Art Gallery will run from January 27 to April 22, 2007. source...............
    YO! Liverpool has taken me 10 years to develop and maintain.
    If you like the website, please
    donate via PayPal!




    Thank you



  2. #2
    PhilipG
    Guest PhilipG's Avatar

    Default

    It will be great to see the model, AGAIN.
    It's not the first time it's been put on view.

  3. #3
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,504
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    A spectacular cathedral which was to take 200 years to build has finally been finished - in miniature.

    A detailed model of Sir Edwin Lutyens's design for Liverpool's Catholic Cathedral has been restored by experts at the city's Walker Art Gallery.

    Building work did start with the crypt, which became the current cathedral after the design was never finished.

    The architectural model, believed to be one of the biggest and most elaborate made, is now going on display.
    Restorers used a platform to complete the fine detail.

    The design was abandoned after World War II when it became too expensive to complete. Its dome would have been twice the size of St Paul's Cathedral in London.

    The model is among the most elaborate ever built

    The model was neglected for many years, before it came into the National Museums Liverpool collection.

    It has taken 13 years and 500,000 to restore.

    Sir Edwin Lutyens started work as an architect when he was 20 and went on to design more than three dozen major English country houses and altered and added to many more.

    He remodelled Lindisfarne Castle and built Castle Drogo. He also designed the Cenotaph in Whitehall, Thiepval Arch on the Somme and many other memorials and cemeteries for World War I.

    Liverpool's cathedral was considered the last great work of his life.

    The Cathedral That Never Was - Lutyens' design for Liverpool runs from 27 January to 22 April at the Walker Art Gallery.
    YO! Liverpool has taken me 10 years to develop and maintain.
    If you like the website, please
    donate via PayPal!




    Thank you



  4. #4
    Newbie jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    places i remember
    Posts
    21
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Lutyens model

    He designed the government buildings of New Delhi too,they are in daily use and magnificent buildings.The model of the cathedral that never was is impressive ...but was it worth all that coin and effort?

  5. #5
    Otterspool Onomatopoeia Max's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Nowhere
    Age
    30
    Posts
    1,913
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default City's unbuilt cathedral unveiled

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/m...de/6297229.stm

    Hardly unveiled as we've seen It on skyscrapernews.com.
    Gididi Gididi Goo.

  6. #6
    Senior Member A.D.W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Age
    48
    Posts
    712
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Any pictures?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Lutyens Crypt at the Metropolitan Cathedral
    By Kev in forum Buildings and Structures
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-04-2009, 04:11 PM
  2. Lancashire Roman Catholic Reformatory for Girls, Old Swan
    By ChrisGeorge in forum Liverpool East
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-25-2008, 04:51 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

For daily updates, to support us further or to join in the conversation: Follow us on Twitter @YOLiverpool / Like our Facebook Page: @LiverpoolInPictures / Join the Facebook Group: Liverpool In Pictures (YO! Liverpool)

YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain. If you like the website, please donate via PayPal!