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Thread: Liverpool' Emigration Role 1830 - 1930

  1. #1
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
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    Default Liverpool' Emigration Role 1830 - 1930

    Liverpool was probably the most important emigration port in world history. It was a huge industry, with emigrants coming from as far away as Russia or Scandinavia. A lot of people come here looking for their family trees, especially Americans. They regard Liverpool as a very special place in their family history.
    BETWEEN 1830 and 1930, more than 9m emigrants sailed from Liverpool bound for a new life in the United States, Canada or Australia.

    For much of this period Liverpool was, by far, the most important port of departure, until the late 19th century when emigrants increasingly came from the countries of southern and eastern Europe.

    Unfortunately, no records of these passengers passing through Liverpool exist for much of this period. The National Archives holds passenger lists of vessels travelling inwards to and outwards from British ports, including Liverpool, from the 1890s onwards. However, there is no index to the records, either by name or by ship.

    Although no official records of emigrants survive in Liverpool, the Maritime Archives & Library, National Museums Liverpool, holds examples of personal records of emigrants such as voyage diaries and letters, which give an idea of the conditions experienced by those leaving Britain to start a new life.

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  2. #2
    PhilipG
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    But there is a site that gives the names of all those that passed through Ellis Island (and I think it's free).
    I suppose a Google would find it.

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    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    But there is a site that gives the names of all those that passed through Ellis Island (and I think it's free).
    I suppose a Google would find it.
    ...and next time you visit the Docs, they will Google your symptoms online too
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    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    But there is a site that gives the names of all those that passed through Ellis Island (and I think it's free).
    I suppose a Google would find it.
    Ellis Island was very late in the immigration game. South Port on the Lower East side of Manhattan was a major point before Ellis.

    The US does have more info than Liverpool. The archives of shipping lines, where they still exist, will give some indication of the people and their origin. Around the Waterloo/Trafalgar/Victoria/Clarence/Princes Docks was primarily the berths of the American packet ships. The packet ship offices were mainly along the Dock Rd at Waterloo Dock. Although departures were all over the docks, including Birkenhead, and the Pier Head too.

    Scandinavians were leaving Liverpool, in full national dress, well into the 1920s. My mother lived in Peel Street and all around there were small hotels where families would stay before getting a ship to America - which could take weeks. My mother said the first women she ever saw wearing near knee length leather boots were Scandinavians.
    Last edited by Waterways; 11-10-2006 at 10:28 AM.
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  5. #5
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev View Post
    ...and next time you visit the Docs, they will Google your symptoms online too
    I've no idea what you mean by this answer.
    Would you please explain?

  6. #6
    scouserdave
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    I've no idea what you mean by this answer.
    Would you please explain?
    Oooh! A red bold font Kev! LOL!
    PMSL!

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