YO! Liverpool
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: City's pictorial history honoured

  1. #1
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,489
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default City's pictorial history honoured

    Liverpool's photographic collections have been recognised as being of national and international importance.

    The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council has awarded Liverpool Record Office its "designation status" for its extensive archive of pictures.

    Organisations with designated collections are seen as looking after the UK's cultural heritage.

    Liverpool City Council leader Warren Bradley said the pictures were "hugely important".

    "Liverpool has a rich and varied past and can look back on a fascinating story," he said.

    "The work of our record office to preserve and catalogue the images which capture this story, and make them available to everyone, is truly priceless.

    We place huge importance in looking after our photographic collection - they are the collected memories of Liverpool David Stoker - Records office manager

    "I'm very proud that this collection has taken its place among the most culturally significant in the country."

    The extensive photographic archives at Liverpool Record Office includes town planning, transport and public health documents.

    There are about 180,000 photographs from the late 19th Century onwards.

    The collection includes the complete work of Edward Chambre Hardman, which is part owned by the council and part owned by the National Trust.


    Lunch was eaten off the Liver Building clock before it was erected

    Hardman was one of the most admired portrait and landscape photographers of the 20th Century.

    The collection also includes 150,000 of his portrait photographs, of local people and visitors including Ivor Novello and Margot Fonteyn.


    ADVERTISING




    Record office Manager David Stoker said: "We place huge importance in looking after our photographic collection - they are the collected memories of Liverpool.

    "Our images are used every day to support all kinds of research, publications, exhibitions and the council's work with the media and cultural organisations."

    Liverpool Record office attracted more than 43,200 visitors during 2005/06 who consulted nearly 40,000 documents and took up over 40,000 computer and microfilm sessions. source....
    Liverpool in Pictures/ YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain.

    All server & domain costs are covered by myself & kind donations of individuals.

    If you like the website, please donatevia PayPal!




    Thank you


    Kev
    2005 - 2017

  2. #2
    scouserdave
    Guest scouserdave's Avatar

    Default

    Just sold 12 pics to Lancaster's Carnegie Publishing for their Liverpool: A People's History book

  3. #3
    scouserdave
    Guest scouserdave's Avatar

    Default

    BTW,
    I place Edward Chambre Hardman up there with Bill Shankly.

  4. #4
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Under The Stairs >> Under The Mud.
    Posts
    7,489
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    LIVERPOOL'S photographic archives have won national recognition.

    The collections have been recognised as being of national and international importance.

    Now the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council has awarded Liverpool Record Office the prestigious "designation status".

    The designation scheme celebrates the leading museum, library and archive collections in England which are of outstanding significance for the country's cultural heritage.Record Office manager David Stoker said: "We place huge importance in looking after our photographic collection.

    "Our images are used every day to support all kinds of research, publications and exhibitions.

    "At the heart of the work of the Record Office is making sure this wonderful record of Liverpool's history can be seen by as many people as possible."

    The extensive photographic archives include the complete work of Edward Chambre Hardman - 150,000 photographs - and the city engineer's archive and housing department archive - 180,000 photographs. source....
    Liverpool in Pictures/ YO! Liverpool has taken me over 10 years to develop and maintain.

    All server & domain costs are covered by myself & kind donations of individuals.

    If you like the website, please donatevia PayPal!




    Thank you


    Kev
    2005 - 2017

  5. #5
    theninesisters
    Guest theninesisters's Avatar

    Default

    For some cracking pictures, try:

    http://www.liverpoolpictorial.co.uk/ainscough/

    I've got his book at home, for someone to travel miles out of his way to take pictures of a town is either batty or someone we have to be so thankful for!!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member ChrisGeorge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    3,592
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jona76 View Post
    For some cracking pictures, try:

    http://www.liverpoolpictorial.co.uk/ainscough/

    I've got his book at home, for someone to travel miles out of his way to take pictures of a town is either batty or someone we have to be so thankful for!!!!

    Thanks, Jona76. Great to see.

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
    Editor, Ripperologist
    Editor, Loch Raven Review
    http://christophertgeorge.blogspot.com/
    Chris on Flickr and on MySpace

  7. #7
    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,924
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Blog Entries
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scouserdave View Post
    BTW,
    I place Edward Chambre Hardman up there with Bill Shankly.
    He was a babbling lunatic?
    The new Amsterdam at Liverpool?
    Save Liverpool Docks and Waterways - Click

    Deprived of its unique dockland waters Liverpool
    becomes a Venice without canals, just another city, no
    longer of special interest to anyone, least of all the
    tourist. Would we visit a modernised Venice of filled in
    canals to view its modern museum describing
    how it once was?


    Giving Liverpool a full Metro - CLICK
    Rapid-transit rail: Everton, Liverpool & Arena - CLICK

    Save Royal Iris - Sign Petition

  8. #8
    Too old to suffer sweetpatooti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Garston
    Posts
    145
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Great pics of Ainscough's.

    My dad used to answer the telephone with "Ann Fowler's Home for Fallen Women". He did it for years.

  9. #9
    Re-member Ged's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Here, there & everywhere.
    Posts
    7,198
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterways View Post
    He was a babbling lunatic?
    Which one?

  10. #10
    Senior Member knowhowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Chester UK
    Posts
    256
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Edward Chambre Hardman

    You can see a few of ECH's wonderful images of Chester and Liverpool from my collection here-

    http://www.bwpics.co.uk/gallery/oldpics.html

    I occasionally used to visit him in his chaotic house in Rodney Street, of which more anon...
    Chester: a Virtual Stroll Around the Walls-
    http://www.chesterwalls.info

    The Liverpool Gallery-
    http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/liverpool.html

    The Chester Shop
    http://www.thechestershop.com


    Chester & Liverpool Guided Walks
    http://www.chesterwalls.info/guidedwalks.html

  11. #11
    Senior Member Howie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kensington, Liverpool
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,196
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    An inspiration through a lens
    Feb 19 2008
    by Peter Elson, Liverpool Daily Post

    The work of Liverpool’s greatest photographer is being used to encourage young people to follow his lead. Peter Elson reports



    LITTLE could I have imagined as I slogged away, heading the Daily Post’s four-year campaign to save photographer Edward Chambré Hardman’s archive, what it would result in.

    With help from the small but tenacious Liverpool Preservation Trust, the simple aim was to keep this fabulous collection of photographs in its city of origin.

    A bonus was the possibility of also saving 59, Rodney Street, Chambré Hardman’s astonishing “time-capsule” Liverpool studio-home. But all the time, there was a far distant dream the pictures would inspire and stimulate a future generation to emulate Hardman in the visual arts.

    Luckily, the National Trust’s Simon Murray (now director of operations) monitored my Daily Post articles, decided to investigate, and finally advised purchase of both house and archive.

    These campaigns always need “angels” to make them a reality. Liverpool Riverside MP Louise Ellman was a stalwart supporter, and even asked a question about the archive’s plight in the House of Commons.

    The then Liverpool council leader, Mike Storey, helped “bang heads together”, as he eloquently put it, and commissioned a special humidified store room at Liverpool Record Office, Central Library, to finally house the archive in safety.

    Finally, there was the couple of million pounds spent on restoring Hardman’s house and garden by the National Trust to create a museum for the public.

    All that seemed a long time coming, but it has arrived and is now well established as a visitor attraction. It’s something everyone on Merseyside should take huge pride in.

    Now comes the icing on the cake. We’re at the point where the photographs, which include a record of Liverpool from the 1920s to the 1960s, portraits, landscapes at home and abroad, are to tour Merseyside.

    That vague hope of bringing these atmospheric photographs into the open so young eyes could see their city in a fresh way by understanding its past will become a reality.

    Hopefully, those unfamiliar with Hardman’s work will also marvel at and be inspired by the artistry and technical accomplishments of this outstanding photographer.

    The exhibition is called Liverpool People and Places – the photography of E Chambré Hardman, but it is more than simply placing his photographs in public places unexposed to his vision.

    It will combine 20 striking Hardman images with work by young Liverpudlians as part of the European Capital of Culture celebrations. The youngsters have spent the past four months using photography as a method of recording the city, its life and its heritage.

    The touring exhibition will be launched at Liverpool’s Metquarter designer shopping centre on April 7 and will finish at the Echo Arena Liverpool in November to coincide with the National Trust’s AGM, when it is held there in November.

    Coincidentally, another National Trust exhibition of Hardman’s work will be one of the first to go on show at the newly-restored Victoria Gallery & Museum, Brownlow Hill, University of Liverpool, when it opens to the public.

    Simon Osborne, the National Trust’s Liverpool property manager, says: “Through Liverpool People and Places, we hope that the city’s young people will explore and develop their own photographic skills.

    “The aim of the project also enables the National Trust to continue paying for an archivist and restoring Hardman’s archives to make access easier.

    “Also important is getting the pictures out to a wider community and encouraging young adults to participate in the project to introduce them to the pre-digital camera age.

    “The students will be equipped with single-lens reflex cameras and get into John Moores University dark rooms to develop and print films. Liverpool Community College will look at how glamour photography was produced in studios in a way that is completely unknown now.

    “It’s about engaging with the community so people have an awareness of a by-gone art form. These pictures were a complete revelation to the students who were absolutely enthralled.”

    With the exhibition travelling to unusual locations like the Metquarter and Liverpool South Parkway station, Simon believes they will touch audiences who do not visit traditional galleries.

    Wayne Colquhoun, chairman and founder of Liverpool Preservation Trust, formed the organisation to alert people to the potential mistakes in losing our cultural heritage.

    “I hoped at the start of our dogged campaign that it would one day inspire a new generation to view Liverpool through the individual lenses of our own eyes,” says Wayne.

    “To know these photographic works of art are now being used as a springboard to do this means all the long campaigning was more than worth it, because investing in youth forms a future generation’s cultural legacy.

    “If one young person is inspired to become a photographer half as great as Chambré Hardman, then I will feel proud to have played my part in some small way. When these works go on exhibition, people should stop, look around and imagine how impoverished Liverpool would be without the knowledge of our historic past through Hardman’s legacy.”

    The project is financed by the Heritage Lottery Fund and Liverpool Culture Company. Five organisations are currently involved: Interchill, Liverpool Community College, Shorefields Technology College, New Heys Community School and South Liverpool Youth Offending Team.

    Laura Naylor, National Trust community project officer and exhibition organiser, says: “All the student participants toured Hardman’s former home and studio.

    “They were supplied with an ‘inspiration pack’ of landscapes, portraits and house ephemera. A project officer helped the groups increase their understanding of Hardman and encourage thinking about wider social issues, like citizenship.”

    Besides developing creative thinking, photography, animation, and film-making, she hopes the young people involved will also develop a sense of team work and a historical awareness of their surroundings.

    Cllr Warren Bradley, leader of Liverpool City Council and deputy chair of the Liverpool Culture Company, sees this as one of the key targets for 2008: “One of the aims of this year is to engage as many people as possible in exploring their identity and celebrating their culture. I applaud the way the National Trust is taking Edward Chambré Hardman’s work out into the community for a new generation to appreciate.”

    THE Liverpool People and Places exhibition opens in Liverpool’s Metquarter on April 7, and then tours community spaces across the city until November. Details of further venues will be announced shortly.

    Source: Liverpool Daily Post

  12. #12
    Senior Member Howie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kensington, Liverpool
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,196
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Photography exhibition at Metquarter
    Apr 8 2008
    by Catherine Jones, Liverpool Echo

    AN exhibition of work by celebrated Liverpool photographer Edward Chambré Hardman has opened in the city centre.

    The Metquarter exhibition, Liverpool People And Places, marks the culmination of a major project involving young people and the National Trust.

    It combines a selection of Irish-born Hardman’s iconic images of Liverpool in the middle of the last century, alongside work by youngsters, who have spent the past five months recording the city through 21st-century eyes.

    When Hardman died in 1988, his photographic studio and house in Rodney Street contained his entire life’s work.

    It was the only known British photographic studio of the mid-20th century where the photographer’s entire output was preserved.

    Liverpool People And Places is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Culture Company.

    It is on show at Metquarter until April 27 and will then move to Queen Square.

    Source: Liverpool Echo

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-09-2011, 08:09 PM
  2. A Pictorial Record of Every Street in Liverpool
    By A.D.W in forum Liverpool Streets and Areas
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 04-24-2008, 10:51 AM
  3. A little history...
    By marie in forum Liverpool Genealogy and People Search
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-28-2007, 08:47 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

For daily updates, to support us further or to join in the conversation: Follow us on Twitter @YOLiverpool / Like our Facebook Page: @yoliverpoolpics / Join the Facebook Group: YO! Liverpool Pictures

× Thanks for coming to the web site. Support our future by turning off your Ad-Blocker or consider a donation via PayPal or Credit Card!