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Thread: Herculaneum Pottery

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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Default Herculaneum Pottery, Toxteth

    Liverpool's forgotten Glory [with apologies to to Peter Hyland].

    Herculaneum Pottery was built on the south shore, Toxteth in 1796. It survived for only 44 years. One of the reasons cited for it's early demise was the rapid development of the Staffordshire Potteries. Even today, 'Herculaneum pottery' is much sought-after by collectors, as examples of early earthenware, creamware and china from Liverpool's industrial past.


    Image 1 ^ Herculaneum Pottery by George Codling, engraving as displayed on share certificates. c.1806. NML image.





    Image 2 ^ Pottery location. The Potteries closed 5 years after the John Bennison map was drawn, in 1840.


    ADVERTISING




    D.
    Last edited by dazza; 01-13-2010 at 01:02 PM. Reason: Map, Version 2 added.

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    Pablo42 pablo42's Avatar
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    Nice one Dazza.

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    Fine work here, Dazza. Thanks. I often give talks on the War of 1812 and at one I gave in Alexandria, which surrendered to the British in 1814, a collector had a specimen of Liverpool pottery which was a small milk or cream jug with the American slogan "Free Trade and Sailors' Rights" and a picture of a battle at sea with the American ship flying the stars and stripes. It is probably not well known that the British made a lot of pottery with patriotic themes for the American market. Similarly I saw a lamp stand in the Maryland Historical Society made in Britain that was in the shape of Baltimore's Battle Monument, built to honor the American dead from the Battle of Baltimore during which the "Star-Spangled Banner" was written by Francis Scott Key.

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    Fine work here, Dazza.
    Thanks Chris, I've been interested in the site, ever since reading The Herculaneum Pottery, a 'Liverpool University Press' book by Peter Hyland.

    On the British/ American War of 1812, and of British patriotism [or 'loyalty' as I should say, here in the UK]. The British pottery industry seemed to be serving two masters! One for the home market, and one for export market, notably America. I did once see a picture of a Chamber Pot with George III's face looking up from it, complete with an English maker's stamp - no doubt made for a very appreciative American market? The potters had an eye, for a brown nose, it seemed [excuse the pun]?

    Image 1 - some examples of c/pots: there's the 'Benjamin Franklin Butler' pot of civil war fame [not Herculaneum]; and even...

    Image 2 - a 'W.E. Gladstone' pot [not Herculaneum].

    Image 3 - a creamware Jug [Herculaneum] showing the 'Apotheosis of Washington' c.1805.

    Image 4 - a Sailors jug [Herculaneum] which contained the sailor's prayer:

    From Rocks & Sands
    And every ill
    May God preserve,
    The Sailor still

    Apparently there is still a lot of this Herculaneum pottery in circulation [in the US & UK], and you can regularly find it on eBay. In production from 1796-1840.

    D.
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    Hi dazza

    I am sure the pottery-makers were entrepreneurs, prepared to sell their wares wherever they could, and if they could equally curry favor with the British with patriotically decorated wares as similarly products that would please the American market, well, why not?

    I was amused by the Gladstone chamber pot. A renowned son of Liverpool, although possibly a political enemy of his or two enjoyed using that particular "po". By the way... I read that the possibly the only off-color reference that Edgar Allan Poe made in his writings was in doing a pun on his name!!!

    Chris
    Christopher T. George
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    Senior Member dazza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisGeorge View Post
    I am sure the pottery-makers were entrepreneurs, prepared to sell their wares wherever they could, and if they could equally curry favor with the British with patriotically decorated wares as similarly products that would please the American market, well, why not?
    Hi Chris,

    'Entrepreneurs' oh totally. I'd love to get my paws on some pro-American, British earthenware?

    The Gladstone pot, probably from [stick my neck out] the rival Wedgewood, Staffordshire kilns?

    Edgar Allan Poe, cheerful soul! I can't imagine having a beer with him in the Fly in the Loaf? Poe-faced before he even started drinking!

    Daz

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