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Thread: High Park Street hall

  1. #1
    Creator & Administrator Kev's Avatar
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    Default High Park Street hall

    ONE of Liverpool's most historic town halls has been restored with the help of more than £200,000 lottery funding.

    Toxteth town hall has become a focus for dozens of community groups since its regeneration was kick-started in 2003.

    Community leaders welcomed Culture minister David Lammy to the High Park Street hall to mark the refurbishment and to celebrate the building's 140th birthday.

    Work includes the restoration of the main hall, described as the "jewel in the crown" of the building,, with its original paint colours and period details; new railings; repaired flagstones and guttering, and better disabled access.
    Mr Lammy praised the restoration and said it showed while the focus for much of the recent investment in Liverpool was the city centre, the city was "so much more".

    Town hall managing director Denise Devine said: "It was the community that set up the company, bought the building and developed it over the past nine years."


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  2. #2
    PhilipG
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    "Toxteth Town Hall" is only a

    nickname.
    With Toxteth never being a town, this building was never a Town Hall.
    The official name was Toxteth Park Public Offices.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Waterways's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilipG View Post
    "Toxteth Town Hall" is only a nickname.
    With Toxteth never being a

    town, this building was never a Town Hall.
    The official name was Toxteth Park Public Offices.
    Toxteth clearly was outside of Liverpool at

    one time and a town in its own right. It was called Harrington at one stage.

    "1774 Parliament granted building leases to the 1st Earl of Sefton. The

    intention was to develop a rectangle of land bounded by Mill Street to the West, Parliament Street to the north, Northumberland Street to the south and the

    river on the fourth side.

    The new town was to be called Harrington in honour Countess of Sefton (daughter of the 2nd Earl of Harrington). But the name

    Harrington did not come into general use. The new town was laid out by a local builder, Cuthbert Brisbrown on a grid system, with intersecting, wide,

    straight streets. The basic grid plan and many of the streets, though not the properties, survive to this day. One of Brisbrown’s earliest buildings was St

    James' Church (at the junction of Mill Street, Stanhope Street and St. James' Place). Work started on this brick-built church in 1774 and it opened for

    worship in 1775. Although dilapidated, this still stands in 2005."

    "1835 Toxteth Park was now bounded by Liverpool and the townships of West Derby,

    Wavertree and Garston. Its western side was the River Mersey. It was an extra parochial township and in 1835 under the terms of the Municipal Corporation Act

    ('An Act to provide for the Regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales'), 9th September 1835, the nearest section of Toxteth Park (from

    Parliament Street to the Dingle), closest to the city centre, was incorporated into Liverpool. It is perhaps important to understand that prior to this date

    what we now think of as a district, Toxteth, was in fact Toxteth Park, self-contained and distinct, it was in no way a part of Liverpool."
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  4. #4
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterways View Post
    "Toxteth clearly was outside of Liverpool at

    one time"
    True.
    "and a town in its own right."
    Not true.
    "It was called Harrington at one stage."
    Only a small

    part.


    All the following is familar, but I don't remember where it's from.
    "1774 Parliament granted building leases to the 1st Earl of

    Sefton. The intention was to develop a rectangle of land bounded by Mill Street to the West, Parliament Street to the north, Northumberland Street to the

    south and the river on the fourth side.

    The new town was to be called Harrington in honour Countess of Sefton (daughter of the 2nd Earl of

    Harrington). But the name Harrington did not come into general use. The new town was laid out by a local builder, Cuthbert Brisbrown on a grid system, with

    intersecting, wide, straight streets. The basic grid plan and many of the streets, though not the properties, survive to this day. One of Brisbrown’s

    earliest buildings was St James' Church (at the junction of Mill Street, Stanhope Street and St. James' Place). Work started on this brick-built church in

    1774 and it opened for worship in 1775. Although dilapidated, this still stands in 2005."

    "1835 Toxteth Park was now bounded by Liverpool and the

    townships of West Derby, Wavertree and Garston. Its western side was the River Mersey. It was an extra parochial township and in 1835

    under the terms of the Municipal Corporation Act ('An Act to provide for the Regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales'), 9th September

    1835, the nearest section of Toxteth Park (from Parliament Street to the Dingle), closest to the city centre, was incorporated into Liverpool. It is perhaps

    important to understand that prior to this date what we now think of as a district, Toxteth, was in fact Toxteth Park, self-contained and distinct, it was in

    no way a part of Liverpool."
    At the risk of being an anorak an "extra parochial township" is not a town.
    Toxteth wasn't a town, and

    therefore couldn't officially call its public offices a town hall.
    Check all the old Street Directories
    Last edited by PhilipG; 10-29-2006 at 03:06 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Paul D's Avatar
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    Any regeneration is good news.

  6. #6
    PhilipG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul D View Post
    Any regeneration is good

    news.
    Of course it is.
    Nobody said it wasn't.

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