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Liverpool Picturebook

British Library Engravings and Aquatints

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Quote Originally Posted by BobEd View Post
A Collection of Engravings,etchings and aquatints of Old Liverpool from the collection held in the British Library. (Click the images to view them 'Full Size')


View showing the waterfront of Liverpool and traffic on the River Mersey. There are many sailing ships docked here in the various docks. During the 18th century a number of docks were built: the first in c.1709-21, Salthouse Dock in 1734, Canning Dock in 1753, George's Dock in 1767, Duke's Dock in 1773, the King's Dock 1784, the Manchester Dock of c.1785. Various buildings can be seen along the waterfront, one of the spires is of St George's Church, but it is difficult to identify the others. By 1800, the population of Liverpool had reached 80,000 and it had prospered as a port, importing cotton for Lancashire's growing textile industry.


View of the River Mersey, with Liverpool in the background from Perch Rock. This was at the tip of the Wirral peninsula, which guards the entrance to the Mersey and access to Liverpool. Since 1683, there had been a wooden perch- a makeshift lighthouse here. This picture shows the river traffic on the Mersey, in stormy weather. During the 18th century Liverpool had developed as a major port, by 1800, had 80,000 inhabitants. Docks were constantly built: the first in c.1709-21, Salthouse Dock in 1734, Canning Dock in 1753, George's Dock in 1767, Duke's Dock in 1773, the King's Dock 1784, the Manchester Dock of c.1785. The port was the centre of importing cotton for the Lancashire Textile industry.


View of a ship in distress on the River Mersey, just outside the docks of Liverpool. The ship has smoke coming from it and appears to be on fire. It is on the verge of keeling over and sinking. There are a number of other boats around the ship, presumably trying to rescue the people on board. This view is taken from a fort, probably Fort Perch Rock, which was built on the end of the Wirral peninsula to guard the entrance to the Mersey. As can be seen in the print, by this time Liverpool was a major port with many docks. It was a centre for importing cotton for the Lancashire textile industry and, by 1800, had a population of about 80,000.
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