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cacher
11-25-2011, 11:48 AM
I've scoured the forum a few times to see if traffic lights have been a subject, without success.

In 1948 I used to ride my bike from the Walton Hall Avenue area, to Water Street by the Pier Head. I cannot recall passing through any traffic lights - all biggish juctions were controlled by a Bobby on point duty, ie. bottom of Everton Vally, Rotunda, Casneau Street? etc.

Does anyone know when and where the first traffic lights were installed in Liverpool?

grekko
11-25-2011, 02:44 PM
I've scoured the forum a few times to see if traffic lights have been a subject, without success.

In 1948 I used to ride my bike from the Walton Hall Avenue area, to Water Street by the Pier Head. I cannot recall passing through any traffic lights - all biggish juctions were controlled by a Bobby on point duty, ie. bottom of Everton Vally, Rotunda, Casneau Street? etc.

Does anyone know when and where the first traffic lights were installed in Liverpool?

Installed by the Automatic Telephone Manufacturing Company (ATM)(PLESSEY's)at the corner of Church Street and Lord Street,either late 1932 or early 1933.

cacher
11-26-2011, 12:34 PM
Thanks Grekko - much earlier than I thought. Did installations stop at "Holy Corner" until after the war 'cos I still can't remember any. I didn't ride my bike through the Church St/Lord Street area so can't have seen the ones installed around 1932.

grekko
11-26-2011, 01:15 PM
Cacher, I honestly couldn't tell you about other installations, I only found out about the Church St/Lord St lights from reading the history of Plessy's......sorry not being able to help any further.

Ged
11-26-2011, 01:40 PM
Here is the auto and elec premises in Edge Lane 1937 preparing a layout for a junction with traffic light controls.

http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/1884/autoteleeleccoedgeln193.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/39/autoteleeleccoedgeln193.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

az_gila
11-26-2011, 03:13 PM
Pre computers the traffic folks got to make and play with nice models...:)

cacher
11-29-2011, 03:59 PM
Thanks Ged for the photo etc. I don't think there were all that many traffic lights around pre war and I suspect there was a pause for installing more during the war...I may be wrong of course.
I don't expect any of the younger generation to remember the rubber strips installed before each set of lights to detect vehicles passing over them. It was a big improvement when the hidden detectors were installed. We don't see them curling up when damaged.

az_gila
11-29-2011, 04:47 PM
Thanks Ged for the photo etc. I don't think there were all that many traffic lights around pre war and I suspect there was a pause for installing more during the war...I may be wrong of course.
I don't expect any of the younger generation to remember the rubber strips installed before each set of lights to detect vehicles passing over them. It was a big improvement when the hidden detectors were installed. We don't see them curling up when damaged.

Yes... and if you were travelling at the speed limit and had already crossed the rubber strips you could safely make if through the lights on amber....:)

This was good since my old cars did not really have good brakes....:PDT_Xtremez_42:

cacher
12-02-2011, 02:40 PM
Poor brakes were always a hazard. Anyone who had a car before the MOT came out, has probably got some hair-raising stories of incidents with their cars....I know I have.

az_gila
12-02-2011, 04:12 PM
Poor brakes were always a hazard. Anyone who had a car before the MOT came out, has probably got some hair-raising stories of incidents with their cars....I know I have.

Yes the older cars had c**p brakes... but it I think it was the switch to front disk brakes (late 60's?) that really helped the braking performance.

ChrisGeorge
12-02-2011, 06:17 PM
Yes the older cars had c**p brakes... but it I think it was the switch to front disk brakes (late 60's?) that really helped the braking performance.

Give us a brake! :snf (41):