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Paul D
10-21-2006, 03:48 PM
I thought this would make a good thread because I'd like to think I could learn

something I didn't already know,I'll go first does anyone else have any?

Merchant Taylors give F.C Barcelona their football strip colours

The

Witty brothers; Arthur Witty, played for FC Barcelona in the first Copa del Rey final and later served as club president between 1903 and 1905. Ernest Witty,

younger brother of above, also played for FC Barcelona. Was also a founding member of the Real Club de Tenis de Barcelona and a Spanish national tennis

champion over a number of years.The Witty brothers also modelled the legendary FC Barcelona colours, the blaugrana, after the original colours used by

Merchant Taylors' rugby team.

peewak
10-21-2006, 07:27 PM
Wow that is amazing^^^
Here's

another... did you know, there are more black cabs in liverpool than anywhere else outside london?
You wouldnt think so on a weekend night

john
10-21-2006, 10:01 PM
And all of them think they own the road :)

jimmy
10-22-2006, 05:42 AM
Liverpool. There are more museums, theatres and galleries,

than any other city region outside London,- including Tate Liverpool, the Walker, Merseyside Maritime Museum, Liverpool Empire and the Lady Lever Art

Gallery.
Liverpool is the most filmed in City outside of London, such films as the 51st
State, The Hunt For Red October, A Letter To Brezhnev. In The

Name Of The
Father, Hilary And Jackie, being filmed there, to name but just a few.

Paul D
10-22-2006, 12:41 PM
Excellent

lads here's one,Robert Morris was born here and at 15 years old went to America and with his father became the countries first leading merchant.He was one

of the leaders of the revolution.He financed the American revolution,financed the war,got George Washington's army out of bankrupcy twice,and took over

personally provision of the army because nobody else knew how to.He was the most astonishing man with phenomenal wealth.:PDT_Piratz_26:



http://www.libertystory.net/LSACTIONROBERTMORRIS.htm

Waterways
10-22-2006, 12:49 PM
I thought this would make a good thread because I'd like to think I could learn something I

didn't already know,I'll go first does anyone else have any?

Merchant Taylors give F.C Barcelona their football strip colours

The Witty

brothers; Arthur Witty, played for FC Barcelona in the first Copa del Rey final and later served as club president between 1903 and 1905. Ernest Witty,

younger brother of above, also played for FC Barcelona. Was also a founding member of the Real Club de Tenis de Barcelona and a Spanish national tennis

champion over a number of years.The Witty brothers also modelled the legendary FC Barcelona colours, the blaugrana, after the original colours used by

Merchant Taylors' rugby team.


Merchant Taylors? There are a few of them around the country.

Paul D
10-23-2006, 03:16 PM
Liverpool Astronomical Society is one of the oldest such societies in the world and the forerunner of the British Astronomical Association and the

"Liverpool telescope" is the World's largest robotic telescope and is situated in the Canary

Islands.

http://www.pparc.ac.uk/Nw/Press/robotic_telescope.asp

Max
10-23-2006, 04:19 PM
Heres something that not many of you know.

http://tinyurl.com/y9bb3t

SteH
10-23-2006, 08:52 PM
Merchant Taylors? There are a few of them around the country.

Wikipedia is

crediting the Crosby school with the Barca strip, although I once read a book on Barca's history and I seem to remember it hinted a school in another

location was responsible.

Paul D
11-05-2006, 12:06 PM
In the 17th & 18th

centuries 40% of all the worlds international shipping sailed into Liverpool laden with every thing the human mind can conceive of and travelling from EVERY

PART OF THE WORLD on a regular basis.

Sloyne
11-05-2006, 02:58 PM
In the 17th & 18th centuries 40% of all the worlds international shipping sailed into Liverpool laden with every thing

the human mind can conceive of and travelling from EVERY PART OF THE WORLD on a regular basis.And at that time it was also said that, New York ships

trade with Liverpool, Liverpool ships trade with the world.

Paul D
11-05-2006, 08:18 PM
Great Sloyne,could you tell us that story were the Liverpool Kings Regiment fought back the

Americans and helped to keep Canada's independence,the Battle of Lundy Lane was it? I remember you talking about it on the other forum and I was facinated

but a lot of the facts escape me now,would you mind writing a little bit about it?

ChrisGeorge
11-05-2006, 10:16 PM
Hello

Paul

This is a bit that I know about since the War of 1812 is one of my specialties. I believe the 8th King's Liverpool Regiment was at Fort York

(later Toronto) although I am not sure they were at Lundy's Lane, otherwise known as the Battle of Bridgewater or the Battle of Niagara Falls, July 25,

1814. The battle was fought on the hill overlooking the famous falls in a location that is now completely built up. It was a night battle that was a

stalemate though both sides claimed victory. It was the bloodiest battle ever fought on Canadian soil, with each side losing about the same number of

men—878 British and 860 American.

Chris

Sloyne
11-06-2006, 01:27 AM
I believe the 8th King's Liverpool Regiment was at Fort York (later Toronto) although I am not sure

they were at Lundy's LaneTo bolster the meagre, mostly Canadian militia and Indian forces at Niagara, the Kingsmen marched from Fort York to Niagara

arriving at dusk on the evening of July 24, 1814. The American force, led by Generals Jacob Brown and Winfield Scott, attacked the British regiment, the

Kings Liverpool, while they where bivouacing behind the cemetery on Lundy's Lane. The battle raged throughout the hot a humid night with many casaulties on

both sides. Close to dawn the fighting abated and when daylight came it could be seen that the Americans had left the field to the British and were in full

retreat across the Niagara River. This was the last and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 and was the battle that broke the will of the invading

Americans. The Americans, in attacking Canada, sought to take advantage of Britains pre-occupation with Napoleon. After this battle Britain was able to

concentrate on defeating the French Emperor Napoleon Boneparte and did defeat him the following year at Waterloo in Belgium.

It was for the Battle of

Lundy's Lane that the King, George III, awarded the Kings Liverpool Regiment the "White Horse of Hanover" to wear as a honour in thier cap.

PS:

Artifacts from this battle can be seen at the small museum dedicated to the battle in Niagara Falls, Ontario. A letter writen by one of the 'Kings

Liverpool' soldiers to his sweetheart in Liverpool, a Miss Dolly Lunt, is/was on display in the National Museum of Canada in Ottawa.

Sloyne
11-06-2006, 01:32 AM
Liverpool's museums and galleries are the

only ones outside of the four British capitals (London, Edinburgh, Cardiff, Belfast) designated 'National' due their importance to British heritage.

Paul D
11-06-2006, 11:38 AM
Thanks Sloyne/Chris for that they're some stories that we can be proud of has anyone got

anymore?

ChrisGeorge
11-06-2006, 01:32 PM
Hi Paul

Thanks, Paul. We probably need a page for Liverpool dragoon commander and MP

General Sir Banastre Tarleton (http://www.banastretarleton.org/). As a lieutenant colonel in the British Army he was commander of the "British

Legion" made up of American loyalists in the southern campaigns of the American Revolution. He remains a controversial figure in the United States for his

supposed brutal tactics, most famously at the alleged massacre at Waxhaws in South Carolina. Another thing that makes him controversial is that as MP,

coming from a slave-trading family, he defended slavery in Parliament. Thus the Tarleton name came up at the time of the recent proposal rename Liverpool

streets that had connections to slavery, there being both a Tarleton Street and a Banastre Street in Liverpool. His father had been mayor of Liverpool in

the 1760's and both his father and brother engaged in the slave trade. He was also in the news because a descendent recently auctioned off some

American militia flags (http://www.flagwire.com/index.php?doc=28&aid=813) captured by Tarleton through Sotheby's in New York for a phenomenal

price.

Best regards

Chris George

Paul D
11-06-2006, 01:42 PM
The Hollywood film The

Patriot also showed him in a bad light I seem to remember.

ChrisGeorge
11-06-2006, 01:47 PM
The Hollywood film The Patriot also showed him in a bad light I seem to remember.

Yes the fictional character of Tavington, played by

Liverpool-born actor Jason Isaacs was based on Tarleton.

Chris

Sloyne
11-06-2006, 02:41 PM
Hi Paul

Thanks, Paul. We probably need a page for Liverpool dragoon commander and MP

General Sir Banastre Tarleton (http://www.banastretarleton.org/).Yes Chris and more. I know a little (very little) of this mans biography

and would appreciate hearing more. If you have the time, why not start a thread on Tarleton? Thanks in advance.

ChrisGeorge
11-06-2006, 02:56 PM
To bolster the meagre, mostly Canadian militia and Indian forces at Niagara, the Kingsmen marched from Fort York to Niagara

arriving at dusk on the evening of July 24, 1814. The American force, led by Generals Jacob Brown and Winfield Scott, attacked the British regiment, the

Kings Liverpool, while they where bivouacing behind the cemetery on Lundy's Lane. The battle raged throughout the hot a humid night with many casaulties on

both sides. Close to dawn the fighting abated and when daylight came it could be seen that the Americans had left the field to the British and were in full

retreat across the Niagara River. This was the last and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 and was the battle that broke the will of the invading

Americans. The Americans, in attacking Canada, sought to take advantage of Britains pre-occupation with Napoleon. After this battle Britain was able to

concentrate on defeating the French Emperor Napoleon Boneparte and did defeat him the following year at Waterloo in Belgium.

It was for the Battle of

Lundy's Lane that the King, George III, awarded the Kings Liverpool Regiment the "White Horse of Hanover" to wear as a honour in thier cap.

PS:

Artifacts from this battle can be seen at the small museum dedicated to the battle in Niagara Falls, Ontario. A letter writen by one of the 'Kings

Liverpool' soldiers to his sweetheart in Liverpool, a Miss Dolly Lunt, is/was on display in the National Museum of Canada in Ottawa.

Hi

Sloyne

Thanks for this helpful information... great stuff. One little note of correction, at the time of the Battle of Lundy's Lane, Napoleon was in

exile on the Island of Elba and thus out of commission. His captivity on Elba enabled some 10,000 British troops to be sent to North America, around 4,000

to the Chesapeake under Major General Robert Ross and 6,000 to be placed under the command of Major General Sir George Prevost in Canada. It was the

September 1814 twin defeat of the British thrusts against Baltimore, after the burning of Washington, D.C., by Ross, and the one down the Champlain Valley by

Prevost, which forced the British government under Robert Jenkinson, second Lord

Liverpool (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Jenkinson,_2nd_Earl_of_Liverpool) to conclude peace in Ghent, Belgium, in December. The American victory at New Orleans occurred January 1815 after peace was concluded but

not ratified by the government of President James Madison.

Napoleon's final defeat came at Waterloo after he escaped from Elba and reigned for a 100

days and then was sent into his final exile on the South Atlantic island of St. Helena, where he died in 1822, allegedly, some claim, by poison administered

either by an agent of the French monarchy or by his British captors.

Chris

P.S., yes, Sloyne, I will start a thread on General Sir Banastre

Tarleton shortly.

Waterways
11-06-2006, 03:37 PM
Hi Sloyne

Thanks for this helpful

information... great stuff. One little note of correction, at the time of the Battle of Lundy's Lane, Napoleon was in exile on the Island of Elba and thus

out of commission. His captivity on Elba enabled some 10,000 British troops to be sent to North America, around 4,000 to the Chesapeake under Major General

Robert Ross and 6,000 to be placed under the command of Major General Sir George Prevost in Canada. It was the September 1814 twin defeat of the British

thrusts against Baltimore, after the burning of Washington, D.C., by Ross, and the one down the Champlain Valley by Prevost, which forced the British

government under Robert Jenkinson, second Lord Liverpool (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Jenkinson,_2nd_Earl_of_Liverpool) to conclude peace in

Ghent, Belgium, in December. The American victory at New Orleans occurred January 1815 after peace was concluded but not ratified by the government of

President James Madison.

Napoleon's final defeat came at Waterloo after he escaped from Elba and reigned for a 100 days and then was sent into his

final exile on the South Atlantic island of St. Helena, where he died in 1822, allegedly, some claim, by poison administered either by an agent of the French

monarchy or by his British captors.

Chris

P.S., yes, Sloyne, I will start a thread on General Sir Banastre Tarleton

shortly.

Napoleon died from the gasses given off by the wallpaper adhesive of the time - or it made him sick anyway.

The war of 1812

the Yanks think they won or was a draw. The 1812 war, the British WON. The US declared war on Britain and Britain took the war right into the US, and even

into the White House - the Shropshire Light Infantry burnt the place down after having dinner there. Must have been an early MacDs, so that would want you to

burn the place down.

The 5th line of the US national anthem,
"and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air",
describes the British

rocket regiments and rocket ships attacking Fort McHenry. The British pulled out of the USA when they achieved their aim - stopped the US from infiltrating

and making claims on Canada. The Brits didn't want the USA, if they did they could have just taken it. After just defeating Napoleon nothing was going to

stop them.

Sloyne
11-06-2006, 03:46 PM
Napoleon was in exile on the Island of Elba/then was sent

into his final exile on the South Atlantic island of St. HelenJust as a point of interest, I have visited both islands. My first time on St. Helena

was in 1959 and my return was just two years ago. Quite an awkward place to reach but, well worth the effort. Thanks for the corrections and I am looking

forward to your submission on Tarleton.

Paul D
11-07-2006, 04:44 PM
Emilia di Liverpool (Emilia of Liverpool) is a dramma semiseria, ("half-serious")

dramatic opera, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Giuseppe Ceccherini wrote the Italian libretto after the anonymous libretto for Vittorio Trento's Emilia

di Laverpaut, itself based on Stefano Scatizzi's play of the same name. It premiered on July 28, 1824 at the Teatro Nuovo,

Naples.

http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/8173/savegc2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Liverpool's very own 19th century opera

is having it's first staged performance for more than 170 years in the city.

Donizetti's Emilia Di Liverpool is being performed at the Royal Court

Theatre this month by a local opera company.
Producer Una McAuley and music critic Lyn Walker join Jenni to talk about the production. Soprano Sam Wright

will perform an extract from the opera.
Emilia Di Liverpool runs at the Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool from 24th until 27th July.Box Office: 0151 709

4321

How many cities can claim to have an opera written about them by a foreigner.

ChrisGeorge
11-07-2006, 06:31 PM
Hi Paul

I have

heard Donizetti's "Emilia di Liverpool" ("Emilia of Liverpool"). He has parts in the opera for the Mountaineers of Liverpool. Shows he never visited the

place. :snf (41):

"My favourite geographical mistake in the arts is Emilia di Liverpool, a 19th century opera by Gaetano Donizetti. Described by the

present-day The Times reviewer as having 'charm and improbability in equal proportion', Emilia di Liverpool is set among the mountains of Liverpool,

and mentions the limpid River Mersey and the 'Liverpool mountaineers'. (For non-UK readers with no geography, Liverpool is a port city on flat land and the

Mersey a busy and polluted shipping lane; and it probably wasn't much different in the early 19th century when Donizetti wrote the opera)."

Apothecary's Drawer Weblog April 2001 (http://www.raygirvan.co.uk/apoth/thought3.htm)

Donizetti's "Emilia di Liverpool" after a century in

obscurity was performed on 12 June 1958 in a concert version by the Liverpool Music Group conducted by Fritz Spiegl as part of the celebration of the city's

750th anniversary. (Jeremy Commons, "Emilia di Liverpool," Music &

Letters, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Jul., 1959), pp. 207-228). (http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0027-4224(195907)40%3A3%3C207%3AEDL%3E2.0.CO%3B2-9)

Chris

Paul D
11-07-2006, 08:13 PM
I did realise

he'd never been here but it's still a coup though it just an example of Liverpool's Global fame.:)

The Teardrop Explodes
11-07-2006, 10:43 PM
The World's* largest ever

outdoor gig for a single** artist- Wacko at Aintree.

*I think it is the World's rather than just Europe's
**Could be the largest for a 'solo'

artist rather than for just one act-ok I'm bein lazy here and should check the facts on his site which is where I got the info from but I know it's still

the World's largest gig for one of those two.

Paul D
11-11-2006, 05:45 PM
The World's* largest ever outdoor gig for a single** artist- Wacko at Aintree.

*I think it is the World's rather than just Europe's
**Could be the largest for a 'solo' artist rather than for just one act-ok I'm bein lazy here and should check the facts on his site which is where I got the info from but I know it's still the World's largest gig for one of those two.

I think it was for a solo singer Jean Michel Jarre plays to millions,I think Robbie Williams has well beat that now.

Paul D
11-18-2006, 11:24 PM
Candyman

Based on a Liverpudlian urban legend and first put into story form in Clive Barker's short story "The Forbidden," in the book In the Flesh. The original story was set in Liverpool.

So Candyman was originally set here.:)

Paul D
11-26-2006, 05:13 PM
The Royal Navy battleship "The Prince of Wales" was adopted by the city of Liverpool whos citizens had raised the full building cost of £10 Million-a staggering £280 Million in todays money.

The ship was built at Cammell Lairds between 1937/41 was with HMS Hood when when the ship was sunk by the enemy battleship "Bismarck" off Iceland in May.

During the action,two shells from The Prince of Wales damaged the Bismarcks fuel tanks.This caused a large oil slick which led to the German warship being hunted down and sunk.

On December 8th The Prince of Wales left Singapore with 4 destroyers but with no air cover,two days later it was attacked and sunk.Although the ship is now a designated war grave,it was feared the bell might be stolen by unauthorised divers,the bell from the Prince of Wales in on display at the Merseyside Maritime Museum.

A Liverpool link to the sinking of the Legendary Bismarck.:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

Kev
11-26-2006, 05:25 PM
I enjoy these little-known facts. keep 'em coming :)

Paul D
11-26-2006, 05:34 PM
I do myself Kev,sometimes you just spot something like this and I think a thread like this helps to keep them all in one place for easy access.Some are more interesting than others but what this thread will eventually show is there's more to Liverpool than meets the eye.:PDT_Piratz_26:

Waterways
11-26-2006, 07:01 PM
The Royal Navy battleship "The Prince of Wales" was adopted by the city of Liverpool whos citizens had raised the full building cost of £10 Million-a staggering £280 Million in todays money.

The ship was built at Cammell Lairds between 1937/41 was with HMS Hood when when the ship was sunk by the enemy battleship "Bismarck" off Iceland in May.

During the action,two shells from The Prince of Wales damaged the Bismarcks fuel tanks.This caused a large oil slick which led to the German warship being hunted down and sunk.

On December 8th The Prince of Wales left Singapore with 4 destroyers but with no air cover,two days later it was attacked and sunk.Although the ship is now a designated war grave,it was feared the bell might be stolen by unauthorised divers,the bell from the Prince of Wales in on display at the Merseyside Maritime Museum.

A Liverpool link to the sinking of the Legendary Bismarck.:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

The ship was pushed into to service because of the Bismarck and went into battle with some Lairds fitters on board. The Bismarck also hit the PoW.

Paul D
11-27-2006, 04:41 PM
Thanks for the additional information John.:PDT_Piratz_26:

Waterways
11-27-2006, 05:05 PM
Thanks for the additional information John.:PDT_Piratz_26:

"At the time of the declaration of war the Prince of Wales was fitting out in Liverpool. The ship was damaged in August 1940 during the Liverpool Blitz. She suffered one near miss that exploded between her port side and the wall of the basin in which she lay, severely buckling and springing her outer plates in this area. "

"Shortly after her commissioning, Prince of Wales joined HMS Hood in stalking and attacking the German battleship Bismarck and the accompanying heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen. The Prince of Wales sailed with civilian technicians still aboard. "

"The Germans shifted fire to Prince of Wales, making three 15" and four 8" hits that seriously damaged the British ship. She was troubled throughout the action by gun functioning problems, but still managed to hit Bismarck with three shells before her own damage forced her to turn away and break off the battle. One of the three British 14" projectiles hit Bismarck's hull forward, flooding some of the German ship's bow compartments. Another hit low and amidships, bringing more water into the ship."

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-atl/batlt-41/bismk-c.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Prince_of_Wales_(1939)

Paul D
11-28-2006, 04:48 PM
"Anyone Who Had a Heart." had already been a hit for Dionne Warwick, but Cilla's version shot to #1 in Britain and remains the biggest selling single by a female artist in the history of British popular music.

I know she gets ****ged off a lot but I like this about her if nothing else,this can be added to us having the first female to hit the number 1 spot Lita Rosa,the most number 1's for any city in the World which was featured in the Guiness book of records,the country's no 1 rock n roll star Billy Fury,the first and only act to occupy the top 5 positions of the American charts The Beatles,Never before had the first three debut singles by a performer all reached the top spot until Gerry and the Pacemakers managed it(the feat would not be duplicated until Frankie Goes To Hollywood did it in the 1980s,the biggest black act of the 70's the Real Thing and Merseybeat being responsible for changing popular culture and introducing Britsh bands to the lucrative American market for the first time,we rock.:celb (23):

Waterways
11-28-2006, 05:20 PM
"Anyone Who Had a Heart." had already been a hit for Dionne Warwick,


It hadn't. It never charted.



but Cilla's version shot to #1 in Britain and remains the biggest selling single by a female artist in the history of British popular music.

I know she gets ****ged off a lot but I like this about her if nothing else.

Paul D
11-28-2006, 05:31 PM
It hadn't. It never charted.

Blame the site I copy and pasted that info off John not me.:D

Waterways
11-28-2006, 06:22 PM
Blame the site I copy and pasted that info off John not me.:D

http://www.everyhit.com/

ChrisGeorge
11-28-2006, 06:38 PM
The situation as I understand it is that "Anyone Who Had a Heart" by Burt Bacharach and Hal David had already been a hit for Dionne Warwick in the United States, but Cilla Black covered it in the United Kingdom, as often happened in those days, British artists recording a hit by an American recording artist. As noted, Cilla's version shot to #1 in Britain.

Chris

Max
11-28-2006, 11:15 PM
Interesting fact is that Kev is really from Wavertree being born in the old hospital that is now Asda.:Colorz_Grey_PDT_16:

john
11-28-2006, 11:24 PM
The situation as I understand it is that "Anyone Who Had a Heart" by Burt Bacharach and Hal David had already been a hit for Dionne Warwick in the United States, but Cilla Black covered it in the United Kingdom, as often happened in those days, British artists recording a hit by an American recording artist. As noted, Cilla's version shot to #1 in Britain.

Chris

Sounds right that CG

Waterways
11-29-2006, 12:12 AM
Yep. Dionne Warwick had success in the United States, but wasn't released here. Most people had never heard of the Dionne Warwick's version.

Cilla Black had a hit with That Lovin Feelin and it charted at the same time as the Righteous Brothers version. Both in the top 5 I think at the same time.

lindylou
11-29-2006, 11:49 AM
Dionne Warwick was peeved about it. You can't blame her.

PhilipG
11-29-2006, 11:58 AM
Dionne Warwick was peeved about it. You can't blame her.

Dionne Warwick's voice is one of the all-time greats.

scouserdave
11-29-2006, 01:53 PM
Yep. Dionne Warwick had success in the United States, but wasn't released here. Most people had never heard of the Dionne Warwick's version.

Cilla Black had a hit with That Lovin Feelin and it charted at the same time as the Righteous Brothers version. Both in the top 5 I think at the same time.
My Mum always had a preference for uptempo music and she could knock out a mean boogie woogie on the piano we had in the parlour of our house in Hughes St! (just thought of a new thread! (http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2698)) However, one her favourite songs was The Righteous Brothers You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'

Paul D
11-29-2006, 03:31 PM
http://img244.imageshack.us/img244/1692/shaversdf2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Ernie Shavers the man who in 1977 went 15 punishing rounds with Muhammad Ali at Madison Square Garden, New York, now works a couple of nights a week on the door at Yates' Wine Lodge in Queen Square, Liverpool.

scouserdave
11-29-2006, 04:28 PM
http://img244.imageshack.us/img244/1692/shaversdf2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Ernie Shavers the man who in 1977 went 15 punishing rounds with Muhammad Ali at Madison Square Garden, New York, now works a couple of nights a week on the door at Yates' Wine Lodge in Queen Square, Liverpool.
You're kidding! Wow, I never knew that. He was a cracking boxer. Deffo have to get a pic of him. Nice one Paul:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

BTW, did you know John H Stracey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._Stracey) lives on Wirral? I only found out a couple of months back when I was chatting to Ricky Tomlinson's agent who does a bit of work for him.

Paul D
11-30-2006, 06:10 AM
Dave he's really pleasant he holds the door open for you and everything which to me feels a bit mad considering who he is,if you're lucky enough to see him don't forget to post your pictures here.:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

Paul D
11-30-2006, 07:12 PM
When Wayne Rooney and Francis Jeffers led the line for England in a friendly a couple of years back they become the first strikers to play for an England team at the same time having attended the same school,that school was De La Salle in Croxteth.


Another footballing first.

ChrisGeorge
11-30-2006, 07:19 PM
When Wayne Rooney and Francis Jeffers led the line for England in a friendly a couple of years back they become the first strikers to play for an England team at the same time having attended the same school,that school was De La Salle in Croxteth.


Another footballing first.

Talking of which I caught somewhere that Wayne Rooney is from Toxteth. So should he be in the Famous Scousers from Toxteth thread? Or did the person who thought that have Croxteth mixed up with Toxteth?

Chris

Paul D
11-30-2006, 07:21 PM
Talking of which I caught somewhere that Wayne Rooney is from Toxteth. So should he be in the Famous Scousers from Toxteth thread? Or did the person who thought that have Croxteth mixed up with Toxteth?

Chris

Yes it's definitely Croxteth,they done a whole documentary on him once banging on about his poor upbringing and the Toxteth riots etc and he's not even from there.:rolleyes: just another excuse to show Liverpool in a bad light in my opinion.:disgust:

Paul D
12-03-2006, 05:41 PM
Everton de Viña del Mar, is a Chilean football club based in the city of Viña del Mar. The club was founded June 24, 1909 (named after Everton F.C. of England) and plays in the first division of the Chilean football league. Their home games are played at the Sausalito stadium, which has a capacity of approximately 25,000 seats.

SteH
12-03-2006, 05:58 PM
There is a Liverpool FC in Urguguay. They were named after several English teams toured there and it was decided to opt for Liverpool as like Montevideo it was a port. They play in black and blue stripes at the 8000 capacity Belvedere stadium.

Paul D
12-03-2006, 06:02 PM
There is a Liverpool FC in Urguguay. They were named after several English teams toured there and it was decided to opt for Liverpool as like Montevideo it was a port. They play in black and blue stripes at the 8000 capacity Belvedere stadium.

I didn't know that Ste nice one it was inevitable there would be one somewhere.:)

SteH
12-03-2006, 06:22 PM
Whereas Everton are one of the major clubs in Chile Liverpool are very much in the shadow of the 2 Uruguayan giants of Nacional and Penarol. They havent won a thing in the history.

Waterways
12-03-2006, 09:43 PM
Everton de Viña del Mar, is a Chilean football club based in the city of Viña del Mar. The club was founded June 24, 1909 (named after Everton F.C. of England) and plays in the first division of the Chilean football league. Their home games are played at the Sausalito stadium, which has a capacity of approximately 25,000 seats.

Like GP the stadium has held a world cup semi-final.

Sloyne
12-04-2006, 03:14 AM
Everton de Viña del Mar, is a Chilean football club based in the city of Viña del Mar."Vina" is a suburb of Valparaiso. I have watched Everton (The Rouleteiros) play O'Higgins and a local derby against Wanderers of Valparaiso. I love the stadium, small but, if the game gets boring the views from the stands are fantastic.

I have also watched Liverpool play Danubio and the team from Fray Bentos (forgot it's name) in Uruguay.

ChrisGeorge
12-04-2006, 05:15 AM
Hi all

There are a number of football teams in Australia named after Liverpool. For example in New South Wales alone, there is:

Liverpool Albion
Liverpool Bossy
Liverpool City
Liverpool Olympic
Liverpool United

See http://www.ozfootball.net/ark/Clubs/ClubIndex.html#L for more info and links.

Chris

christy
12-04-2006, 12:58 PM
Bob Marley's dad was an Army Captain from Liverpool.

christy
12-04-2006, 01:00 PM
Bob Marley's dad was an Army Captain from Liverpool.
b

Sloyne
12-04-2006, 01:11 PM
Yep. Dionne Warwick had success in the United States, but wasn't released here. Most people had never heard of the Dionne Warwick's.Dionne Warwick is a world wide mega star, known and appreciated throughout the world and her recordings were released in Britain. Cilla is almost totally unknown outside of the UK. Dionne has appeared on UK tv in variety and talk shows, I have never heard of Cilla doing the same on any North American tv (but I could have missed her).

ChrisGeorge
12-04-2006, 02:12 PM
Bob Marley's dad was an Army Captain from Liverpool.


Interesting to hear! Thanks, Christy. According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Marley), "His father, Norval Sinclair Marley, was a white Jamaican born in 1895 to British parents from Sussex. Norval was a Marine officer and captain." A separate entry on Norval Sinclair Marley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norval_Marley) confirms the Sussex connection but denies any Welsh one. A BBC page (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/north_east/3431139.stm) on the possible Welsh link, quotes Chris Marley as saying that Norval Marley, born in Jamaica to a family from Sussex "travelled from Jamaica to England where he joined the British Army on 14 August 1916 at Liverpool." So possibly that is where the Liverpool connection comes in?

Chris

ChrisGeorge
12-04-2006, 02:16 PM
Dionne Warwick is a world wide mega star, known and appreciated throughout the world and her recordings were released in Britain. Cilla is almost totally unknown outside of the UK. Dionne has appeared on UK tv in variety and talk shows, I have never heard of Cilla doing the same on any North American tv (but I could have missed her).

Hi Sloyne

I think it is true to say that Cilla enjoyed some mild success in the United States as well as elsewhere in the world as part of Brian Epstein's stable of stars in the early to mid Sixties, although in recent decades she has been mostly a British star.

Chris

Waterways
12-04-2006, 07:44 PM
Hi Sloyne

I think it is true to say that Cilla enjoyed some mild success in the United States as well as elsewhere in the world as part of Brian Epstein's stable of stars in the early to mid Sixties, although in recent decades she has been mostly a British star.

Chris

Apparently she was invited over many times, but never went.

ChrisGeorge
12-04-2006, 07:56 PM
Hi Waterways

Cilla made US TV appearances, including the Ed Sullivan Show, performed a 1965 cabaret season at the Plaza Hotel in New York, and had a minor U.S. hit with "You're My World".

Chris

Sloyne
12-04-2006, 08:48 PM
I think it is true to say that Cilla enjoyed some mild success in the United States as well as elsewhere in the worldThe word I would use is "tepid", and that was only in the sixties. The "elsewhere" would be Australia, New Zealand and South Africa due, obviously, to the large UK ex-pat immigrant groups. Canada, dominated as it is by the US media with it's attendant culture, had very little exposure to UK secondary performers. I have lived in North America for forty years and prior to emigrating had been visiting, every seventeen days, since 1956 and I am a Scouserphobe and can attest to the previously mentioned fact.

By-the-way, I am a fan of Cilla and knew her personally while growing up.

Waterways
12-04-2006, 10:32 PM
Hi Waterways

Cilla made US TV appearances, including the Ed Sullivan Show, performed a 1965 cabaret season at the Plaza Hotel in New York, and had a minor U.S. hit with "You're My World".

Chris

Despite what Sloyne says, Cilla was not secondary in the 60s. She had her own prime time TV show, "Cilla", and all the visting US mega stars were on doing duets with Cilla. When she was massive in the Commonwealth she had no need to go to the US - and they did ask her over. She had been invited to top chat shows but turned them down. Cilla could have been very big over there if she had done the obligatory tours.

Sloyne
12-05-2006, 12:31 AM
When she was massive in the Commonwealth she had no need to go to the US - and they did ask her over. She had been invited to top chat shows but turned them down.Name some?

Another thing, for any performer, the US is 'THE' market. There is not one performer, of any nationality, that does not aspire to "making it big" in the US entertainment industry because, as they say, "that's where it's at". Any performer who tells you different is probably lying. The oposite is quite true, a number of US performers had no interest or refused to perform in the UK. Sinatra and Presley were just two notables in this group.

According to her fan club web site, the only recording of Cilla's that made the charts in the US was "Your my world".

Waterways
12-05-2006, 12:56 AM
Name some?

Another thing, for any performer, the US is 'THE' market. There is not one performer, of any nationality, that does not aspire to "making it big" in the US entertainment industry because, as they say, "that's where it's at". Any performer who tells you different is probably lying. The oposite is quite true, a number of US performers had no interest or refused to perform in the UK. Sinatra and Presley were just two notables in this group.


Sinatra played London regularly. Elvis was scared after the Beatles wiped him out and never went to the UK. Elvis hated leaving the south never mind leaving the US.



According to her fan club web site, the only recording of Cilla's that made the charts in the US was "Your my world".

Yep. Cilla wasn't that interested in making the US when all was fine where she was. She was never short of a few shillings.

The US is not where it is at in a global market. The UK controls the world music scene - the artists and the business.

Sloyne
12-05-2006, 01:10 AM
Sinatra played London regularly.Sorry, I should have clarified, "other than the London Paladium".

Waterways
12-05-2006, 01:23 AM
Sorry, I should have clarified, "other than the London Paladium".

And the Albert Hall.

ChrisGeorge
12-05-2006, 02:00 AM
And the Albert Hall.

That's because he was Francis Albert Hall Sinatra. :celb (23):

Sloyne
12-05-2006, 12:41 PM
And the Albert Hall.But you still haven't answered my first question, which is; What US talk shows did Cilla turn down? Waterways, Cilla is virtualy unknown in North America, Dionne Warwick is not.

Waterways
12-05-2006, 01:08 PM
But you still haven't answered my first question, which is; What US talk shows did Cilla turn down? Waterways, Cilla is virtualy unknown in North America, Dionne Warwick is not.

I don't know. I was reading it once. It wasn't recently. 80s, 90s.

Sloyne
12-05-2006, 01:21 PM
I don't know. I was reading it once. It wasn't recently. 80s, 90s.As a Cilla fan, and personal friend, I am pleased for her success and wish her every further success in the future, however, and contrary to your assertions, Cilla is a virtual unknown in North America. it is to our loss, I'm sure but, wishing otherwise doesn't make it so.

Waterways
12-05-2006, 01:45 PM
As a Cilla fan, and personal friend, I am pleased for her success and wish her every further success in the future, however, and contrary to your assertions, Cilla is a virtual unknown in North America. it is to our loss, I'm sure but, wishing otherwise doesn't make it so.

I wasn't saying she is well known. She was in the 1960s and even had a hit record. Cilla was not that interested in the slog to make it big there. She did that stint at the NY hotel but never liked staying there. She wasn't interested in subsequent tours, etc.

Paul D
12-05-2006, 01:59 PM
I'm sorry I mentioned Cilla now.:ninja:

Sloyne
12-05-2006, 02:01 PM
I wasn't saying she is well known. She was in the 1960s and even had a hit record.Cilla had one recording that entered the US charts but never made it into the top five. That song was "Your my World". Understandable when you know that Cilla's competition was Dionne Warwick, who recorded mostly the same material, Burt Baccharach and Hal David music. Dusty Springfield was more of a success, in the US, than was Cilla yet, she was a virtual unknown in this market. No Waterways, wishing for something doesn't make it so.

I think Vera Lynn was the first popular trans-Atlantic star, being very popular with UK based GI's, but even she didn't make it big in the US. Understandable when you consider the competition, competition like Helen O'Connel, Judy Garland, Jo Stafford, Patti Page, Doris Day, Lena Horne, Rosey Clooney, Ella Fitzgerald, etc. I think the first British female singer to make it big in the US was the Cardiff born singer Shirley Bassey.

Waterways
12-05-2006, 02:23 PM
Cilla had one recording that entered the US charts but never made it into the top five. That song was "Your my World". Understandable when you know that Cilla's competition was Dionne Warwick, who recorded mostly the same material, Burt Baccharach and Hal David music. Dusty Springfield was more of a success, in the US, than was Cilla yet, she was a virtual unknown in this market. No Waterways, wishing for something doesn't make it so.


Dusty Springfield's success was after Cilla's 1965 stint. Very late 1960s/early 1970s. The white Queen of Soul. In the mid 1960s she was still with the Springfields.



I think Vera Lynn was the first popular trans-Atlantic star,


No. Lilly Langtree in the 1800s. The world's first superstar.



being very popular with UK based GI's, but even she didn't make it big in the US. Understandable when you consider the competition, competition like Helen O'Connel, Judy Garland, Jo Stafford, Patti Page, Doris Day, Lena Horne, Rosey Clooney, Ella Fitzgerald, etc.


Vera Lynn was a very different singer than all those. More like your Ma singing.



I think the first British female singer to make it big in the US was the Cardiff born singer Shirley Bassey.


The second. To make it big in the US in those days, you have to do the tours and TV shows, etc, otherwise nothing at all - Dusty was resident in the USA. Cilla didn't do it. If the Stones had not toured constantly in the US they would never have been as big as they are. You have to follow their system.

ChrisGeorge
12-05-2006, 02:34 PM
Dusty Springfield's success was after Cilla's 1965 stint. Very late 1960s/early 1970s. The white Queen of Soul. In the mid 1960s she was still with the Springfields.





Hello Waterways

Actually Dusty Springfield's first success slightly preceded Cilla in achieving worldwide fame with "I Only Want To Be With You" one of her biggest hits in 1963. Although Cilla recorded "Love of the Loved" released September 1963, her first success was "Anyone Who Had a Heart" released January 31, 1964. Dusty left the Springfields in 1962. You are correct that Dusty remained an international star in the late 1960's when her career got a new lease on life with the release of the album "Dusty in Memphis." See http://www.dustyspringfield.nu/ and http://www.cillablack.com/music-singles.htm

Chris

Waterways
12-05-2006, 03:06 PM
Hello Waterways

Actually Dusty Springfield's first success slightly preceded Cilla in achieving worldwide fame with "I Only Want To Be With You" one of her biggest hits in 1963. Although Cilla recorded "Love of the Loved" released September 1963, her first success was "Anyone Who Had a Heart" released January 31, 1964. Dusty left the Springfields in 1962. You are correct that Dusty remained an international star in the late 1960's when her career got a new lease on life with the release of the album "Dusty in Memphis." See http://www.dustyspringfield.nu/ and http://www.cillablack.com/music-singles.htm

Chris

I was out by a few years with the Springfields - it was actualy 1963 not 62. Once the Beatles came along everything before was old hat, so many had to re-invent themselves. Dusty aimed for the US market and lived there eventually. Cilla would not live there. Dusty was ill from the stress of the US circuit which Cilla would not do.

When Dusty went to Memphis she changed her style and hit a niche which no other had done.

Paul D
12-10-2006, 04:35 PM
http://img452.imageshack.us/img452/4379/chuckberry0yw.jpg

Chuck Berry spent much of 1962 and all of 1963 in jail after being convicted on a Mann Act charge. When he emerged in January of 1964, the popular music landscape had been forever changed by the British Invasion. Fortunately artists like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones worshipped the founding father of rock 'n' roll. [The stones included "Carol" on their 1964 debut, and the Beatles included a cover of "Roll Over Beethoven" the same year on their second U.S. album.] Berry used this momentum to go into the studio to cut one of the strongest albums of his career. In addition to the hits "No Particular Place to Go" (No. 10), "You Never Can Tell" (No. 14), and "Little Marie" (a sequel to "Memphis" that went to No. 54), it also includes the standard "Promised Land." To some extent, this is Berry's final hurrah. A year after the album's release, he turns forty, and the elder statesman of rock seems to have lost much of his drive. He has one final hit (the double entendre novelty song "My Ding-A Ling" goes No. 1 in 1972), but by then Berry seems content to spend the remainder of his career on the oldies circuit. But ST. LOUIS TO LIVERPOOL is classic Berry, and it's made even better with the addition of three bonus tracks: "Fraulein," "The Little Girl From Central" and "O'Rangutang." If you need proof that Berry was still a vital artist after the British Invasion, this album proves it beyond a doubt.

Track Listings
1. Little Marie
2. Our Little Rendezvous
3. No Particular Place to Go
4. You Two
5. Promised Land
6. You Never Can Tell
7. Go Bobby Soxer
8. Things I Used to Do
9. Liverpool Drive
10. Night Beat
11. Merry Christmas, Baby
12. Brenda Lee
13. Fraulein
14. Little Girl from Central
15. O'Rangutang

Kev
12-12-2006, 09:27 PM
Ok, 5 years after the Norris Green estate was built, its population was as great as Shewsburys, that's a lot of peeps.

ChrisGeorge
12-12-2006, 09:35 PM
Hi Paul D

Thanks for that information about Chuck Berry. I remember him as an acclaimed artist even after the success of the Beatles and other new groups and that he had several songs that charted in the new era.

The following review is from Wilson & Alroy's Record Reviews (http://www.warr.org/berry.html)

St. Louis To Liverpool (1964)

Likely his last solid album, with four big deal hits: "Little Marie" (a sequel to "Memphis"), "No Particular Place To Go," "Promised Land" and "You Never Can Tell." Each has clever lyrics, though they're all rehashes of his classic sound, and a couple of other tunes are even more blatant ("Go Bobby Soxer," which manages to reuse bits and pieces from half a dozen Berry songs). As usual, he stretches most on the instrumentals: "Liverpool Drive" has some manic soloing though the title seems purely inspired by marketing rather than any audible Mop Top influence; "Night Beat" does live up to its name, a quietly desperate evocation of a nightclub after closing. Everything's by Chuck except for covers of "Merry Christmas Baby" and Elmore James's "Things I Used To Do"; my LP doesn't list a producer or sidemen, but I assume Johnnie Johnson was still pounding the keys. (DBW)

Chris

Ged
12-13-2006, 04:28 PM
The longest goal ever scored in top flight football happened at Anfield when Ian St. John scored directly from Hunt's cross. :unibrow:

john
12-13-2006, 04:32 PM
very good:)

Paul D
12-20-2006, 02:32 PM
Ok, 5 years after the Norris Green estate was built, its population was as great as Shewsburys, that's a lot of peeps.

:eek: It's also the biggest council estate in Western Europe and West Derby sorting office covers the biggest area in Western Europe.:)

Paul D
12-20-2006, 02:32 PM
The first known individual with partially human characteristics is a little Australopithecus female called Lucy. She was given that name some 3 million years after her death. It was borrowed from the Beatles hit Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. Lucy's almost complete fossilized skeleton was discovered in Ethiopia in 1974. Although fully grown, she was only about 107cm (3'6') tall.

Paul D
12-20-2006, 03:54 PM
William Henry Finlay was born in Liverpool England on 17th June 1849 and was a South African astronomer.He was a first assistant at the Royal observatory in Cape Town in the years 1873 to 1898.
He was also at the same time a first astronomer,who saw the large September comet in 1882.This happened on the 7th September 1882,four years later he discovered then still the shortperiodic comet 15P/Findlay.

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Finlay&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=1&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dwilliam%2Bhenry%2Bfinlay%252Bliverpoo l%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D

Paul D
12-23-2006, 10:03 AM
Neill Gorton is from Huyton Liverpool and he owns Millennium FX which is one of Europe's leading creators of make up fx,prosthetics,animatronics and character make up for films,television and commercials.He's worked on everything from the amazing battle scene on Omaha Beach at the start of Saving Private Ryan to the current Doctor Who,is there any area of creativity of boys don't touch?:)

Here's a couple of interesting websites about him.
http://gortonstudio.blogspot.com/

Here's some of the films and show's that he's worked on.
http://imdb.com/name/nm0003929/

http://www.millennium-fx.co.uk/

http://www.mfxreplicas.com/about.php

Paul D
12-30-2006, 07:01 PM
The Derby family gave their name to the "The Derby" horse race when Lord Derby organised racing on Leasowe Common, long before the race moved on to Newmarket and Epsom.

ChrisGeorge
12-31-2006, 01:32 PM
The Derby family gave their name to the "The Derby" horse race when Lord Derby organised racing on Leasowe Common, long before the race moved on to Newmarket and Epsom.

Hello Paul

I have heard this story and it is a well-told story, appearing for example on Visit Liverpool on their page on Horse Racing in Liverpool (http://www.visitliverpool.com/site/what-to-do/horse-racing). Yes Leasowe Castle was supposedly built in 1593 as a racing box to watch races on Leasowe Common (there is a datestone on the Tower with the Stanley family crest, the Legs of Man dated 1593). But presumably a number of gentlemen of the day sponsored horse racing, so why do we presume that the racing at Leasowe was the origin of the Derby? Leasowe Castle was built by Ferdinando, 5th Earl of Derby (http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/FerdinandoStanley(5EDerby).htm), who was a patron of Shakespeare's rival, Christopher Marlowe, and has been suggested by some as the author Shakespeare's plays and in line to succeed Queen Elizabeth I (see below). He died in Ormskirk on 16 April 1594 at the age of about 35. It was rumored that he had been poisoned by the Jesuits. His "gentleman of horse" was greatly suspected of administering the poison, for on the same day that the Earl was attacked, he fled on one of the Earl's best horses and was never heard of again. However, Wikipedia traces the Derby to much later:

"The Derby, as it is known today, originated at a celebration following the first running of the Epsom Oaks in 1779. Edward Smith-Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby (whose horse Bridget had been victorious in the race) and Sir Charles Bunbury flipped a coin and whoever won the toss was to have the race named after him. Despite losing the toss Sir Charles was to claim victory with his horse Diomed in the inaugural running the following year, collecting prize money of £1,065 15s. The Earl achieved his first success in the race in 1787 with Sir Peter Teazle."

Chris

http://www2.localaccess.com/marlowe/sh28.jpg

Ferdinando Stanley, Lord Strange, 5th Earl of Derby, a patron of Marlowe in the early 1590s. From an essay on Shakespeare and Marlowe, "Whose Grave Was It? Or did Marlowe die in Deptford?" Presented at The Shakespeare Authorship Studies Conference on the 8th of April 2005. Courtesy of John Baker.

Paul D
02-12-2007, 07:46 PM
At Broughton Hall in West derby,over a game of snooker,owner Gustavus C Schwabe,struck a deal to set up the White Start shipping line with Thomas Henry Ismay.

Gerard
02-12-2007, 07:59 PM
Saw Chuck Berry on The Empire about 12 Years ago?..
Got some good piccies of him getting in his Limo after the show..
Now where are thee !

Paul D
08-23-2007, 05:34 AM
St Francis Xavier's Church in Everton was the first catholic church to be built in Britain after the reformation in the 16th century.Following a meeting a meeting in the Rose and crown pub in Cheapside,the church was eventually erected in 1848.

John Brodie improved road transportation when he built the World's first ring road (Queens Drive).

Kev
08-23-2007, 04:34 PM
Liverpool Roman Catholic Cathedral is the ONLY CATHEDRAL IN THE WORLD with an underground car park.

ChrisGeorge
08-23-2007, 04:38 PM
Liverpool Roman Catholic Cathedral is the ONLY CATHEDRAL IN THE WORLD with an underground car park.

Thanks, Kev. Great to know! Hope you are keeping well!

Chris

Cadfael
08-23-2007, 06:18 PM
The choir stalls from the Lady Chapel in Liverpool Cathedral were taken out and put in All Saints, Childwall.

taffy
08-23-2007, 07:14 PM
The choir stalls from the Lady Chapel in Liverpool Cathedral were taken out and put in All Saints, Childwall.

Not any more, they've sent them back to the cathedral !!!

Cadfael
08-23-2007, 07:39 PM
Not any more, they've sent them back to the cathedral !!!

I know, so they can fit more 'happy clappy' bands in to the church :rolleyes: Sang in those stalls for many a year too.

AK1
08-23-2007, 08:05 PM
I'm not sure if this has already been said, but Larkhill Gospel Hall on Larkhill Lane is the first place that John Lennon ever performed in public. Wether it was as part of the Beatles I don't know.

Paul D
08-28-2007, 04:07 PM
Sefton Park is the biggest urban park in the country outside of London.

Paul D
08-28-2007, 04:13 PM
Oriel Chambers is one of the most important buildings ever designed,without it there would be no skyscrapers.This building revolutionised how we work in an office and this building is one of the most historically important in the UK and indeed the World as it is the first modern building.

Cadfael
08-29-2007, 10:28 PM
The longest peal on the bells at Liverpool Cathedral took place yesterday which was 5 hours (none stop).

It was also the heaviest ten-bell peal yet rung.

gregs dad
09-04-2007, 07:46 PM
In 1925 the headmaster of the Liverpool Institute,Rev.H H Symonds started
a school camp in a disused church hall in Borrowdale in the Lake District.
Some boys walked from Liverpool,some cycled and some came by train.They slept on first world war stretchers which they folded in the daytime. Rev.Symonds went on to open the first youth hostel in the country at Loggerheads with the help of the Holt family of the Alfred Holt Shipping Line. I visited the site of the Borrowdale camp this year all that
remains is a small iron gate and the concrete base which is nearly grassed over.
gregs dad

Paul D
10-13-2007, 03:03 PM
Dealey Plaza in Dallas,the site where JFK was assassinated was named after a scouser who became one of the biggest newspaper proprietors in the United States.George Dealey whos' both parents were from Liverpool established the Dallas Morning News,which is still the biggest newspaper in the city.

http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/2346/dealey3507211550dpwmme7.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Danny Farley
01-18-2008, 07:26 PM
Hi Steve, Yes the Kings Regiment served many years in Canada with two Battalions the 1st Bat King's Regiment and the 2nd Battalion. They where at the thick of it and did fight at Niagara. So much so that the regiment was awarded the battle honour NIAGARA.
Danny

lierbag
01-19-2008, 12:06 AM
Often forgotten, is the fact that in the mid 19th century, Liverpool was a key supporter of radical artistic movements, such as the Pre Raphaelites (considered cosy as a hearthside rug today; but in their day considered as weird and offensive as anything by Damien Hirst & co).

In the early 1850s, The Pre Raphaelites - in particular William Holman Hunt - were at the point of giving up and getting regular day jobs, when the Liverpool Academy kicked in and awarded Hunt their annual £50 prize, just as he was on the verge of destitution. It saved his career.

Support for Pre Raphaelite painting over the following years eventually split the academy, and ultimately lead to its breakup. But Hunt never forgot his debt to Liverpool - and many years later, allowed the Walker Art Gallery to buy his painting: 'The Triumph of the Innocents' for a knockdown price, as a token of his gratitude.

Steven
01-19-2008, 02:02 PM
Often forgotten, is the fact that in the mid 19th century, Liverpool was a key supporter of radical artistic movements, such as the Pre Raphaelites (considered cosy as a hearthside rug today; but in their day considered as weird and offensive as anything by Damien Hirst & co).

In the early 1850s, The Pre Raphaelites - in particular William Holman Hunt - were at the point of giving up and getting regular day jobs, when the Liverpool Academy kicked in and awarded Hunt their annual £50 prize, just as he was on the verge of destitution. It saved his career.

Support for Pre Raphaelite painting over the following years eventually split the academy, and ultimately lead to its breakup. But Hunt never forgot his debt to Liverpool - and many years later, allowed the Walker Art Gallery to buy his painting: 'The Triumph of the Innocents' for a knockdown price, as a token of his gratitude.



Myself,,,,,,,,, I was spellbound by them but could never take to Millais with that 'Scapegoat' or was that Holman Hunt ?

To me it was a time of love and romance.

Libertarian
01-19-2008, 04:01 PM
Myself,,,,,,,,, I was spellbound by them but could never take to Millais with that 'Scapegoat.'

To me it was a time of love and romance.

aaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh

lierbag
01-20-2008, 09:19 AM
'The Scapegoat' was one of Holman Hunt's (now at the Lady Lever Art Gallery; Port Sunlight. Interestingly, it's the 'second wave' of Pre-Raphaelitism (people like Burne Jones) who are primarily responsible for our lingering impression of their work being dreamlike and chocolate-boxy. Millais' and Holman Hunt's early stuff challenged every artistic orthodoxy of the day - to a shocking degree by the standards of that time - and often featured socially relevant themes or risque subject matter.

lierbag
01-24-2008, 12:28 PM
Does anyone know the address of the Liverpool lodging house Brendan Behan was arrested at, in 1939, when in the city as part of an IRA bombing campaign?

Ged
01-24-2008, 12:43 PM
The triumph of the innocents is one of my all time fave Walker pics, all those bubbles (though i'm sure babies don't have arse cheek muscles like that)

shirleya
02-03-2008, 11:27 PM
do you think this is a good thread to ask if carl jung actually visited liverpool or just dreamed he did when he mentions the pool of life. what do you all think of his dream????

Merseyrose
09-03-2008, 12:34 AM
Very interesting thread!

I'm impressed by everyone's knowledge!

@Sloyne: Do you really mean "Scouserphobe" (hater) or do you mean "Scouserphile" (lover)? :)

skgogosfan
11-12-2008, 09:40 PM
Sefton Park is the biggest urban park in the country outside of London.

That's pretty impressive-I didn't know that!

Dave.

dazza
12-12-2009, 11:49 PM
The crew of the Titanic reputedly nicknamed the long, wide service corridor running on E deck "Scotty Road".
I wonder whether the St Anthony's or the Rotunda got a mention en route as well?

D.

pablo42
12-13-2009, 12:04 AM
The crew of the Titanic reputedly nicknamed the long, wide service corridor running on E deck "Scotty Road".
I wonder whether the St Anthony's or the Rotunda got a mention en route as well?

D.

I believe all ships central passageway was called Scotland Road. On U.S. Ships it's called Broadway.

dazza
12-13-2009, 12:26 AM
I believe all ships central passageway was called Scotland Road. On U.S. Ships it's called Broadway.

No wonder Scotty was so well known outside the city.

pablo42
12-13-2009, 12:33 AM
No wonder Scotty was so well known outside the city.

I don't know if you remember it, but it was a great road to have a pub crawl in. I done it many times, but even then a lot of pubs had gone.

dazza
12-13-2009, 12:44 AM
I missed all the fun unfortunately, most had been knocked down by then. My dad grew up on Scotty Road and would have been familiar with most of them from 1940' on.

pablo42
12-13-2009, 12:47 AM
They each had their own distinctive atmosphere. It was great. I was lucky enough to go into them. Folk on the pianos and spoons. Just don't see it now.

dazza
12-13-2009, 12:55 AM
Sad to say, but I don't think I've been in pub that's had a piano playing. Jools Holland tells some great story's about the atmosphere and characters that he used to meet in some of the post-war Bermondsey pubs, when he was startin' out.

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-music023.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

pablo42
12-13-2009, 09:13 AM
Sad to say, but I don't think I've been in pub that's had a piano playing. Jools Holland tells some great story's about the atmosphere and characters that he used to meet in some of the post-war Bermondsey pubs, when he was startin' out.

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-music023.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

Yes, East End pubs and those south of the river were some great pubs. A lot of them had pianos. Usually if you could hammer out a tune you'd get on the piano. As the night got on people would join in singing. It was a real good atmosphere.

lindylou
12-13-2009, 10:59 AM
My nan used to play piano and sing in the pubs, mainly the Belmont and the Winslow, the Railway club and the MA on Sheil rd.

dazza
12-13-2009, 11:26 AM
This almost became a reality. London department store Harrod's had asked local firm of architects Willink & Thicknesse [designers of 'Cunard House' one of the three graces] to create a design for the old St. Peter's site [Now Cross Keys Court] in Church Street. The design did not turn to a commission, and the site was eventually purchased by Woolworth's who moved across the street into their newly designed store in 1923.

Partsky
12-13-2009, 09:33 PM
Does anyone know the address of the Liverpool lodging house Brendan Behan was arrested at, in 1939, when in the city as part of an IRA bombing campaign?

Yes, Lierbag, I would like to know where he stayed as well. I bet it was down Scotland Road way as there was a very strong IRA presence there during the 20s, 30s and 40s. It was not just the urban areas of Liverpool that suffered bombs in those days. I live near Maghull and the IRA blew up Green Lane Swing Bridge which is almost opposite the Coach and Horses pub. Even a lot of local people dont know this but it was in response to the British Armys habit of blowing up Bridges or Barns in Ireland to punish local people for harbouring IRA members. The community Centre which stands behind on the Green Lane side of the Bridge was originally a wealthy local farm. The culprits were all charged at the scene. Like Behan, they were really incompetent bombers. Thank God

Oudeis
12-14-2009, 05:08 AM
I learn that the hotel was in Sheephaven. Sorry that I cannot be of further help. :(

pablo42
12-14-2009, 11:25 AM
Yes, Lierbag, I would like to know where he stayed as well. I bet it was down Scotland Road way as there was a very strong IRA presence there during the 20s, 30s and 40s. It was not just the urban areas of Liverpool that suffered bombs in those days. I live near Maghull and the IRA blew up Green Lane Swing Bridge which is almost opposite the Coach and Horses pub. Even a lot of local people dont know this but it was in response to the British Armys habit of blowing up Bridges or Barns in Ireland to punish local people for harbouring IRA members. The community Centre which stands behind on the Green Lane side of the Bridge was originally a wealthy local farm. The culprits were all charged at the scene. Like Behan, they were really incompetent bombers. Thank God

They've always been incompetant. Not a great change there.