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brian daley
02-07-2009, 08:03 PM
I am starting a thread of some wonderful old postcards and pictures of ships throughout the age of steam. The first is of the Paddle tug Electric built on the Tyne in 1883, she worked until 1912. The second is the Emily ,a schooner rigged steamship ,built in 1878 in South Shields by Readheads. She was wrecked while on passage from Hull to Norkopping in Sweden in december 1906

Samp
02-07-2009, 08:11 PM
Nice pictures Brian!

brian daley
02-07-2009, 11:04 PM
Here we have the Isle of Man Steam Packet Co's Queen Victoria of 1887,she was the fastest paddle steamer of her day passing the Wallesy shore.
The Ben-My -Chree was another I.O.M liner and she was built in 1927 ( I went to school camp on her in 1954 )
Last ,but not least is the Aberdeen of 1881 ,built in Glasgow, she was a barque rigged screw ship and was in the Aberdeen White Star Line. She was the first ocean going ship to have triple expansion engines. Sold to the Turks before the First World war,she was renamed Halep and was sunk by a British submarine in the Sea Of Marmaris in 1915.

Waterways
02-08-2009, 12:25 AM
The Ben-My-Chree was another I.O.M liner and she was built in 1927 ( I went to school camp on her in 1954 )

I went to school camp on her much later, which shee had a black hull. She had a long service life. The IoM ships had steam turbines.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 12:58 AM
First we have another barque rigged screw ship,P. & O. Lines the Bombay of 1852,she is pictured at anchor off Port Denison in Sydney Harbour.
Next is the Manchester Merchant ,built at Jarrow in 1900. She was requisitoned by the War Departmentment for carrying supplies to the Boer war and is shown flying the Blue Ensign.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 01:17 AM
The familiar red funnels of this ship show she is a Cunard liner ,it is the Lucania ,built 1883 for the Liverpool to U.S.A service. She is shown leaving the Mersey with a very old skyline on her starboard side.
The barque rigged wooden paddle steamship is the Europa of 1847. Built in Glasgow for Cunards British and North American Steam Packet service whose pennants she is flying on her main truck; the U.S ensign on her foretruck shows that she is about to enter American waters.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 01:30 AM
This is the Booth Line steamship Lanfranc,built in Dundee in 1907 and shown as a hospital during the First world War.
Please note,for some reason or other I cannot download too many pictures at one time,I hope I am not overloading the system.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 02:33 AM
I have had the devils own job to down loadthis thumbnail,this is the only format Icould do it in.
The picture is of the Royal Mail Stem packet company liner ,the Atlantis,She was built in 1913 as the Andes and served on the South American run until the great depression of 1929. Rather than lay her up Royal Mail changed her name and sent her cruising and she is shown here in the fjords in 1930.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 02:16 PM
The first picture is of the Denbighshire,this is a brigantine-rigged steamship that was built in 1899 for the Shire of David Jenkins and Co. This is from a painting done by Chinese artists working on a production line basis specializing in ship painting in the 19th century . WhenI next show one of their paintings I shall denote it by putting a capital C after the picture.
The second picture comes from the same studio and is of the Blue Funnel liner ,the Achilles ,she is barquentine rigged and was built in 1866, one of the initial trio of ships that established Alfred Holts as a viable shipper to the Orient.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 02:28 PM
Here is a wonderful painting of a jigger-barque rigged steamship the Orient ,pictured passing Gibraltar,she was built for the orient Line in Glasgow in 1879.
Then we have a brigantine rigged steamship the Saxon. Built in 1863 for the Union Steamship Co. of Southampton, shown moored up to buoys in Port Louis ,Mauritius.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 02:38 PM
Some fascinating bits of ephemera now,this is a postcard of the Titanic which someone saw fit to send as a message 7 months after the disaster.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 02:57 PM
Another postcard to Miss Dora Halfacre,this one sent by her Egyptian pen pal Hamdi Chime of Alexandria ,the vessel in the Suez Canal is the N.DL.S.S. Prinz Ludwig. This was sent in 1913.

brian daley
02-08-2009, 03:07 PM
Another card for Dora ,this time showing the P.&O.liner Japan passing throught the Suez Canal,I wonder what became of her relationship with Hamdi?

brian daley
02-08-2009, 05:28 PM
This is a pre World War One postcard sent by a boy to his friend, more of which later.I hope you like them as much as I do .

brian daley
02-08-2009, 05:40 PM
This one was posted in the early 1920's,same boy sending to the same person,different address, he is not a schoolboy anymore.Look at the cost of the stamp!

brian daley
02-08-2009, 05:44 PM
And here he is, at sea himself,I wonder where he was bound,the date shows 1928.

brian daley
02-10-2009, 12:00 AM
Top picture is of the Wallasey ferries,Iris and Daffodil on their return from the raid on Zeebrugge in 1918.They are battle scarred and King George V was so impressed by the part they played in that raid that he ordered them to be renamed Royal Iris and Royal Daffodil.
The second picture is of the White Star Liner Oceanic returning to the Mersey from the U,S.A., New Brighton Tower is shown just off her bow,the White Star tender Magnetic is off her port bow.

Spike
02-10-2009, 07:59 PM
Great pics.

Nice site here http://www.photoship.co.uk/Browse%20Ship%20Galleries/

brian daley
02-10-2009, 08:03 PM
Thre Isle of Man Steamships here,sorry they are undated but undoubtedly old, The Tynwald, the Viking and the King Orry. Maybe your grandparents went on these....

brian daley
02-10-2009, 08:22 PM
Two from Liverpool and one from Blackpool, First the Manxman,then the Manx Maid and last ,but not least,the Atalanta of Blackpool. Graceful ships all.

brian daley
02-10-2009, 08:31 PM
Two from my childhood, school camp and a naughty week away in my wild youth ,plus a day trip with my wife and three year old son ,a lot of memories are invested in these vessels. The Tynwald and the beautiful Lady of Mann. Do you have memories if them too!

brian daley
02-10-2009, 08:35 PM
Spike ,that is a great site and I have often spent hours browsing through it. If it sailed the seas ,it is most probably on there,
Cheers,
BrianD

brian daley
02-11-2009, 12:02 AM
I just love these postcards,sent in a bygone age when the world was a much bigger place and everywhere was faraway.
The Strathaird like a gleaming white castle set in an azure sea,surrounded by bumboats full of exotica,the sunblasted mountain in the background telling of a land so hot that you can feel the blessed sun burning your cold northern skin. A British and India liner is moored on the port side ,could this be Aden and our ships be bound for the Orient?
And then there is the Ranpura,majestic as she towers over the over the bustling launches and feluccas,this looks like Port Said ,the home of great literature and exotic herbs,plus those wonderful post cards.

Spike
02-11-2009, 09:35 AM
I have been researching my Great uncle Austin Owens who was in the Merchant Navy. I have found he was on " BALTIC 11 " in 1932, A White Star Line ship as part of the weekly Liverpol-New York route. In WW2 he was on " BRITISH TRADITION " in 1942 and " LA PAMPA " in 1944 working as a Greaser.

He worked after the war also. probably on a lot more ships than i have found.

My Nans cousin was aboard " THE BEDFORDSHIRE " when it sank in 1942 off Ocracoke Island USA. He was only 18.

I am a total Newbie with Ships so i am loving these threads you guys are posting :PDT11 keep them coming.

brian daley
02-11-2009, 11:33 PM
Hi Spike ,thank you for your kind comments,it is nice to know someone out there is interested. I was intrigued to hear about your sea going relatives.Should you ever need help in your researches you could do no better than to log on the Mercantile Marine site,there is a guy on there called Billy McGee who is the acknowledged master of M.N. history.
And talking about history,here are two more from my archives....
First is the Geelong of 1904,she was built for the Blue Anchor Line as an Emigrant carrier.P.O acquired the line and Blue Anchor disappeared without trace. The Geelong was sunk while in Convoy through the Mediterrannean after colliding with another British ship.
The second postcard is of the Clan Matheson ,built on the Clyde in 1919 and the fourth ship in the Clan Line to carry that name.

captain kong
02-12-2009, 06:47 PM
I dont have any postcards of old ships , I do have photos of the old ones.
This the old Georgic, last of the White Star liners built, on fire and beached in the Gulf of Suez and after she was rebuilt as a troopship and emmigrant carrier. I sailed on her last voyage, to Cape Town, Fremantle. Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbanme, Penang, Singapore Meekong River Viet Nam, Aden ,Suez, Algiers, Marseilles, Liverpool, then to the Clyde for breaking in 1955

captain kong
02-12-2009, 08:04 PM
Here is a ship I have been on a few times, she is the `FALLS OF CLYDE`,
preserved in Honolulu, Hawaii. she sailed under Red Ensign when built in 1878 to 1899, to India , Australia, California UK, Bought in 1899 by Matsons of Hawaii, under Hawaiin flag, then USA took over Hawaii in 1900. 1907 converted to oil tanker,carrying 2800 tons, Hawaii to San Francisco. 1927 sold to Alaska, then 1963, sold for preservation in Honolulu.

captain kong
02-12-2009, 09:08 PM
Here is the BALCLUTHA preserved in San Francisco, I have been on board many times,
Built in 1886 on Clyde, She rounded the HORN 17 times in 13 years. 1899 sold to Hawaii 1902 sold to Alaska Packers, In 1933 she appeared in the film Mutiny on the Bounty, Charles Laughton and Clark Gable.
In 1954 she was sold for preservation to San Francisco, a Very interesting ship to go aboard if your in Frisco.

brian daley
02-12-2009, 10:31 PM
Excellent Pictures,Cap'n Kong,I had'nt seen any of them before,keep 'em coming. Anyone else got any old pics they'd like to put on here? we'd love to see them!
BrianD

brian daley
02-12-2009, 10:42 PM
Couple of Thos. & Jos Harrisons here,the first is the Wanderer shown being piloted past Dumbarton Rock on the River Clyde, an old coal burner.

Second is the first motorship of the line, and the first new build after WW11, the Herdsman. She is shown down in the Thames Estuary,passing a nice couple of sailing barges.

Trader
02-13-2009, 03:08 AM
Capt. Kong (Brian)

There is a good article in this months "Shipping Today & Yesterday" entitled
Memorable Ships all about the Georgic & Britannic with some photos.

Alec.

liverbob
02-13-2009, 06:19 AM
hi brian,i have six or seven hundred pics of merch ships,i was an avid collector of them till it got too expensive on my pension.also a big libary of ship books.

brian daley
02-13-2009, 08:33 AM
Hey Liverbob, Bring 'em on!!! I look forward to seeing your pics very soon(but not all at once). I bet you have some that each and everyone of us has sailed on ;I'm agog !,
BrianD

captain kong
02-13-2009, 12:56 PM
Good one of the HERDSMAN there Brian, My brother was on her in 1948. I have saved it in my collection.
Thanks fior that Trader and Liverbob.

I have more than 1200 + SEA BREEZES, SHIPS, SHIPS MONTHLY, etc.
The Sea Breeze Collection started in January 1950.

captain kong
02-13-2009, 01:20 PM
I have been aboard this famous old ship many times, in San Diego, Cal. My son lived in dago and I always went aboard every time I visited. She still sails every year into the Pacific.
If only someone had preserved the Vindicatrix. we could still sail her, what an experience.
The Star of India was found in a delapidated condition by Alan Villiars, and helped to kick start the preservation.

This information is off the San Diego Museum.site. thank you.

The Star of India is the world's oldest active ship. She began her life on the stocks at Ramsey Shipyard in the Isle of Man in 1863. Iron ships were experiments of sorts then, with most vessels still being built of wood. Within five months of laying her keel, the ship was launched into her element. She bore the name Euterpe, after the Greek goddess of music.
Euterpe was a full-rigged ship and would remain so until 1901, when the Alaska Packers Association rigged her down to a barque, her present rig. She began her sailing life with two near-disastrous voyages to India. On her first trip she suffered a collision and a mutiny. On her second trip, a cyclone caught Euterpe in the Bay of Bengal, and with her topmasts cut away, she barely made port. Shortly afterward, her first captain died on board and was buried at sea.

After such a hard luck beginning, Euterpe settled down and made four more voyages to India as a cargo ship. In 1871 she was purchased by the Shaw Savill line of London and embarked on a quarter century of hauling emigrants to New Zealand, sometimes also touching Australia, California and Chile. She made 21 circumnavigations in this service, some of them lasting up to a year. It was rugged voyaging, with the little iron ship battling through terrific gales, "labouring and rolling in a most distressing manner," according to her log.

The life aboard was especially hard on the emigrants cooped up in her 'tween deck, fed a diet of hardtack and salt junk, subject to mal-de-mer and a host of other ills. It is astonishing that their
death rate was so low. They were a tough lot, however, drawn
from the working classes of England, Ireland and Scotland, and
most went on to prosper in New Zealand.




EUTERPE and now the STAR OF INDIA,

brian daley
02-13-2009, 09:21 PM
The first vessel is the Goth,built in Belfast in 1902.She is shown in the colours of the Union Castle line.

The second is the Nam Sang,built on the Clyde in 1893 for Jardine Mathesons Indo China Steam Navigation Co. She traded out in the Far East between Calcutta and all ports on the way to Japan (what a run that would have been heaven or what?).
BrianD

brian daley
02-15-2009, 09:51 PM
First up we have the Federal Steam Navigation's "Somerset" her classic lines show her beauty at its best. Built by John Browns on the Clyde in 1903 she sailed on the Australian and New Zealand trade until the Great War. She was torpedoed off Ushant on the 28th July 1917.

The Cunard liner "Saxonia" was built in 1900 and is easily recognisable by the size of her huge funnel,towering 106 feet above the main deck. She is shown in American waters,see the Stars and Stripes on her foremast.

brian daley
02-15-2009, 11:39 PM
This is a wonderful painting by Frank Mason R.I.,it is called Oil on Troubled Waters and shows an old coal burning tanker in a storm at sea. It was painted before WW11 and there is no name for the ship.

brian daley
02-16-2009, 12:00 AM
I had to post this one just to give you folks who have not been to sea a glimpse of what a storm can look like from aboard ship. This is an old colourgravure and it was taken from the promenade deck of the Norddeutscher Liner "Bremen". This deck is 38 foot above the water line and the gale was a force 8 with the velocity of the waves running at between 34 to 40 knots. Bracing what?

birdseye
02-16-2009, 09:07 PM
The Wavertree, 2170 tons, built in Southampton in 1885 and operated by the Leyland Line in Liverpool. All their ships were named after suburbs of the city. I took this in the South Street Seaport museum in New York last summer. Picture is a bit cropped but when I moved back to get it all in you couldn't read the name on the bow.

brian daley
02-16-2009, 11:58 PM
Nice picture birdseye,I have long wanted to visit the South Street Maritime museum. Have you got any more pics, and is that brooklyn Bridge we can see through the rigging?

brian daley
02-17-2009, 12:18 AM
Two ship from our Imperial past, the P,&O. liners, S.S. Narkunda and S.S. Maloja. Built for the India ,China and Australia trade, they would have carried the people who ran our overseas Empire, from the solar topeed ,walrus mopustached officers of the Indian Army to the memsahibs who ran the hospitals ,schools and other necessary services. There would have been troops to man the frontiers and emigrants to build up our dominions, I cannot look at these ships without thinking of how Britain predominated world affairs in those long ago days. "Another brandy Colonel?" " I don't mind if I do!!"

birdseye
02-17-2009, 01:47 AM
Sorry Brian, that was the only shot I got there. It was our last day and it was a really fleeting visit. The museum is really well done, like everything else in the city. I had time to grab this postcard which I've scanned. The ship behind the Wavertree there is the Peking, which has quite a history too. I was interested to see just where all those thousands of voyages from the Princes Dock finished up. I hope to go back in the not too distant future and, having done all the major sights, I can concentrate on places like this.

Yes, that's Brooklyn Bridge behind the museum.

brian daley
02-17-2009, 08:25 AM
Wonderful shot birdseye, I had a painting on a plate of the Peking and the Taipei ,two of the tea clippers, it showed them in full sail scudding up the channel in a bid to be first home with the tea. What graceful vessels they were. Thank you,
BrianD.

birdseye
02-17-2009, 01:10 PM
A few years ago I watched the Gorch Fock going out of the Mersey and what a fantastic sight it was when it dropped all sail and took off like a greyhound. There's a really good account of life on a sailing ship called "The Last Grain Race" by travel writer Eric Newby, who sailed on the Moshulu in the 1930s. A tough life.

brian daley
02-17-2009, 10:18 PM
Hi birdseye, I read Eric Newbys book when I was at sea and was enchanted by his tales of the Moshulu, I also read Cracker Hash before I went to sea and that made me even more determined to have a life less ordinary.
I tried to post two pictures on here tonight,one of the Thermopylae and the other of the Cutty Sark, both with the bone in their mouths soaring along under full sail. Unfortunately they would'nt download because the browser wanted a security code? whats up?
The browser has accepted the Gunung Djati, Blue Funnels only full size passenger liner.
Formerly the Empire Orwell,she was purchased by Holts in 1958 and was used on the Hadj service from Indonesia to Djeddah and was renamed after an ancient Javanese Islamic holy man.

birdseye
02-18-2009, 01:22 AM
Nice picture Brian. Funny how ships always look better in paintings rather than photographs. Here's a link about sailing ships you might not have come across. Shows what happened to the Moshulu - a very swish dockside restaurant in Philladelphia now.

http://www.thesquarerigger.com/moshulu.html

captain kong
02-18-2009, 05:44 PM
Some good pictures there lads. I used to see the Gunung Djati at Tanjong Priok in 1960, our cadets and Mates used to go aboard to see their Blu Flu mates.
Gunung Djati once said ?Ingsun titip tajug lan fakir miskin?
The word Gunung means `Mountain` in Javanese. bagoos.

GUNUNG DJATI was built in 1936 by Blohm & Voss K.a.A. at Hamburg with a tonnage of 16662grt, a length of 578ft, a beam of 72ft and a service speed of 18 knots. She was launched as the Pretoria on 16th July 1936 for the Deutsche Ost-Afrika Linie and commenced her maiden voyage from Hamburg to South Africa via Southampton on 19th December. In 1939 she was requisitioned by the German Navy as an accommodation ship based at Hamburg. She was taken over by the British Government as a war prize in 1945 for use as a troopship. Renamed Empire Doon she was managed by the Orient Line for the Ministry of War Transport but it was soon ascertained that she had problems with her boilers and was laid up. She was reboilered in 1949, brought up to troopship standard and renamed Empire Orwell in recognition of Orient Line management retaining also the MOWT's 'Empire', the Troopship's 'River' and the Orient Line's 'O' nomenclature. In 1958 she was chartered to Pan-Islamic Steam Ship Co. of Karachi to carry pilgrims and at the end of the season was laid up in the Kyles of Bute. Alfred Holt & Co. purchased her in November of the same year for pilgrimage duties. It was Holt's intention to rename her Dardanus but she entered service as the Gunung Djati, the name of the leading Javanese Haji and an Islamic missionary. Operated by the Ocean Steam Ship Co. she was refitted by Barclay Curle at Glasgow who replaced the troopship accommodation with space for 2000 pilgrims and 106 first class passengers. On 7th March 1959 she sailed from Liverpool bound for Djarkarta where she joined the Tyndareus which was operating a similar service. After three seasons she was sold to the Indonesian Government in 1962 who continued to operate her for pilgrimages. In 1965 she was sold to P. T. Maskapai Pelajaran 'Sang Saka' of Djakarta without a change of name and transferred to Pan-Islamic Steam Ship Co. who continued the Mecca Pilgrimage service. She was converted to diesel in 1973 and refitted at Hong Kong in 1975. She returned to the Indonesian flag in 1980 as a naval accommodation ship and was renamed Kri Tanjung, Penant 971. By 1984 she was no longer operating as a seagoing vessel.
Source: http://www.red-duster.co.uk/BLUEFUN19.htm


I have been on the Peking in South Street a few times. I have some photos some where. I`ll try to find them. When your on deck she is massive, UI was amazed at the size of her. The Vindi is no comparison.

The Moshulu, I have the book by Eric Newby and a photo book by him taken when he did the "Last Grain Race".
An interesting link about it there.
I did a painting of the Moshulu.
Here is the Peking, I found it on my computer, I think it belongs to a lady who put it on a site somewhere. If she sees it thanks for the use of it.I lost the details.

brian daley
02-19-2009, 10:43 PM
The steamship "Tregenna" was built for the Hain Steamship Co. in 1949 and is shown being berthed by an Alexanders tug on the London River. She has nice elegant lines,but I don't know what they were like to sail in.

brian daley
02-19-2009, 10:55 PM
The "Thermopylae" was one of the greatest tea clippers ,built in 1868,she set a record on her maiden voyage which has stood for all time .She left Gravesend for Melbourne in November 1868 and anchored off Melbourne sixty two days after passing the Lizard . She went on to greatness in competition with the Cutty Sark and the Peking in the China Tea "races"

brian daley
02-19-2009, 11:02 PM
Built in 1869 ,the Cutty Sark was designed to rival the Thermopylae.She made her maiden voyage from London to Shanghai in 104 days. She has come to personify the greatest in Maritime achievement and is currently being restored to her former beauty in Greenwich.

birdseye
02-20-2009, 01:35 AM
Thanks Brian. Yes, the Tregenna does have very elegant lines, a really sleek looking ship. I was just thinking, looking at the squareriggers, what it must have been like to be ordered aloft to take in sail when the ship was battering along in a gale. Just the thought of doing it is frightening enough.

Thanks for the Red Duster link Cap'n Kong. Never come across that one. I'm saving it for the next rainy Sunday afternoon.

taffy
02-20-2009, 09:48 AM
Built Dumbarton Scotland 1939. For more info

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Royal_Daffodil_(1939)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/87/a2740187.shtml

brian daley
02-20-2009, 11:05 AM
Hi Taffy, I used to see the London Royal Daffodil regularly when I was working on the Thames,she was a very pretty ship much larger than the original owner of the name ,the Mersey ferry . They both perormed heroically in their respective wars and were worthy of the "Royal" sobriquet.

captain kong
02-20-2009, 11:05 PM
Tho it is not a ship it is the Merchant Navy Memorial in Cardiff, near the bottom of Bute St. on the dock side. Very unusal.
Some kids were jumping on it so I gave them a bollocking and ended up having to defend my title against some dads.

brian daley
02-21-2009, 12:21 PM
The Ariel of 1865 was one of the most extreme of the clippers built for the china Tea trade.She had a length of 195 feet, a beam of 33.9 feet,a depth of 21 feet ,and a gross tonnage of 1085. The vessel was unusually fast in some conditions ,but to this speed her after lines were so fine that it was dangerous for her to run before the wind in heavy weather. This probably accounted for her disappearance without a trace in 1872.(Ignore the Title Taipei on the picture, a mistake)BD.

captain kong
02-21-2009, 01:59 PM
This should bring back the memory Brian
The Star Ferry in Hong Kong. I took the photo last March while in Honkers.
They are still the same ones we sailed on 50 years ago. never changed.
The trip on them was free for pensioners.

captain kong
02-21-2009, 02:08 PM
Here is a superb painting of the Cunard Liner, FRANCONIA, built in 1922.
I sailed on her as Quartermaster in 1956, Liverpool -- New York run. then scrapped in December 1956.
This Painting is on board QE2.

captain kong
02-21-2009, 02:14 PM
Here is another memorable historic ship, photo taken in San Francisco.
the ARRANMORE, built in 1893 on the Clyde.
later the VINDICATRIX. I was Bosun on her in 1952

captain kong
02-21-2009, 02:30 PM
Here is the CERAMIC,
Built in 1913 for White Star Line, in 1934 when Cunard took over she was transferred to Shaw Savill,Torpedoed and sunk by U515. (The Captain was later shot in USA as a POW trying to escape, he was accused of being a war criminal.) on 6/7 December 1942
655 pasengers and crew were left in the lifeboats to perish. one man, Eric Monday, was taken prisoner.

brian daley
02-21-2009, 02:43 PM
Splendid collection there Cap'n Kong, the Ceramic was as ugly as the Franconia was beautiful. The one an ungainly old scow and the other a pretty lady. Perhaps the Ceramic would have looked nice in a painting though.
The Hong Kong skyline was a lot less crowded when I was there, the ferry is more modern than the ones that were there then too. Remember that film about the poor guy stuck on the ferry,"Ferry to Hong Kong". Now come on you quizzers , who starred in it?
BrianD

captain kong
02-21-2009, 05:39 PM
Ferry to Hong Kong, with Curt Jurgens, Sylvia Syms, Orson Welles, Noel Purcell

Curt Jurgens is the ferry boat skipper and Orson Welles a drunk on a trip to Macao
Orson Welles has no passport and he cant get ashore in Macau and cant get ashore in Honkers, so he is stuck on the ferry until they are attacked by pirates.
They were making the film in Honkers when I was there in 1959, on the Good Hope Castle, we had just taken her to Junk Bay for scrapping. We were there for two weeks hanging around. waiting for an old Dakota to find Hong Kong and take us home. I went into a tailors shop in Kowloon and there was Curt Jurgens being measured for a suit. I thought if the tailor is good enough for him then he is good enough for me. So I got the best suit I have ever had and so cheap.

brian daley
02-22-2009, 12:23 AM
A nice old picture of the White Star sisters in Gladstone dock in 1934. The Georgic is on the right and her appearance only differs from the Britannic in the shape of her streamlined bridge.The Georgic was slightlly heavier at 27,759 gross tons against the Britannics 26,943 gross tons. At the time they were the largest motor vessels in the world.
BrianD

captain kong
02-22-2009, 04:30 PM
Good ones of two famous ships,
Here is a different type of photo

It is me as a Captain over the bow rigging a sling on the anchor to remove it as it was damaged.
The crowd didnt want to go over the side in case they fell in and got their feet wet, modern "ABs".I was nearly sixty years old then so I had to show them what being an AB is all about, I must admit, I did enjoy doing it.

18stanley
02-22-2009, 05:52 PM
Thanks for showing the Britannic and the Georgic, Brian. I spent hours
along the Dock Road and the Pier Head in the 30's. Whenever I got to the
Landing Stage it seemed to be almost a certainty that one or the other would
be there - they were a wonderful sight. If by chance they weren't there it was
usually the turn of either the Apapa or the Reina del Pacifico. Any chance of
seeing a photo of either of these in due course,please? Stan H.

captain kong
02-22-2009, 06:05 PM
Here you are two views of the infamous Reina Del Pacifico and one of the APAPA

brian daley
02-22-2009, 10:04 PM
Glad you like the pics StanH, Cap'n Kong was quick off the mark there with those great shots. Let's hope we can keep digging in to those photo albums and revive some more memories.
Tonight we have a picture of a really special square rigger, the "Lightning".
She made her maiden voyage from liverpool to Melbourne in 1854 in record breaking time.Outward bound she did 2,188 miles in seven days.She served succesfully on the Liverpool Melbourne for over 10 years. She was destroyed by fire in 1869.
BrianD

18stanley
02-22-2009, 11:20 PM
Many thanks Cap'n for such a quick reply. You've left me not a little
intrigued concerning the Reina but I wont press. I only remember her as a
frequent visitor and very attractive looking ship. The Apapa was a recent addition to Elder Dempster, if I remember rightly- didn't she replace the Accra ?
Stan H.

captain kong
02-23-2009, 05:28 PM
Hi Stanley, the Accra and the Apapa were sisters, built in 1947 for the West African trade. Passenger and cargo. They were scrapped in 1967 and 68

here is a photo of the ACCRA

The Reina Del Pacifico was not always a popular ship to sail on as a seaman.
There was a Captain Whitehouse and Bosun named Lah Murphy, whose favourite saying was "Get up and be logged", which meant after a night on the ale in Valparaiso, you would end up adrift or in gaol and so you had to go up on the bridge in front of the Captain and be logged a couple of days pay. At the end of the voyage you always got a bad discharge in your discharge book, but if you sailed again in her he would wipe it out and give you a good one.

A DISASTER The Reina del Pacifico, after a refit in Harlands, Belfast to fit her out for peacetime service.

The accident occurred approximately 7 miles north east of Copeland Island in the North Channel of the Irish Sea at 16:46 on 11 September 1947."

The Belfast Weekly Telegraph reported a week after the accident, on 19 September 1947:

"In an instant the engine room was a shambles, the lighting extinguished, ladders and access platforms destroyed and the atmosphere thick with smoke. When rescuers entered the engine room they found fires breaking out and bodies everywhere. The appalling result was that twenty-eight people died, either instantly or from their injuries, and a further twenty-three were hurt. "

"HEROIC SERVICE ... For three hours, Dr. Hamilton, in his first medical appointment, worked like a Trojan. He had himself lowered into the devastated engine room and with the assistance of the First Officer waded knee-deep in oil and other debris while striving to free those who were trapped. Then he organised a first aid service in the second class lounge, while stewards tore sheets and tablecloths into bandages. He is estimated to have bandaged nearly 60 men himself."

a photo of the ACCRA

captain kong
02-23-2009, 05:56 PM
The Blue Riband started in 1838 for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic. the first ship was the Sirius, the Hales Trophy started in 1933
The winners of the HALES TROPHY FROM 1933
1933-1935 Rex Italia Line 28.92 knots
1935-1936 Normandie Compagnie G?n?rale Transatlantique 29.98 knots
1936-1937 Queen Mary Cunard White Star Line 30.14 knots
1937-1938 Normandie Compagnie G?n?rale Transatlantique 30.58 knots
1938-1952 Queen Mary Cunard White Star Line 30.99 knots
1952- United States United States Lines 34.51 knots

The Queen Elizabeth 2 never went for the Trophy, Cunard always believed that safety was more important than speed. BUT if she had gone for it I think she would have won it. After leaving Japan last March, 2008, we did over 35 knots bound for Honolulu, she was then approaching 40 years of age. A fantastic vessel. that should have been retired to Liverpool instead of being turned into a Frankenstein Monster by the Arabs.
That is why I have includued her here.

captain kong
02-23-2009, 06:28 PM
I have just recieved this email from CUNARD, It should be interesting.

Cunard Features in BBC Documentary

Dear Captain Aspinall

As a valued Cunard guest we thought you may be interested to hear of an exciting BBC broadcast this weekend involving the world's most loved ship, QE2.

A BBC film crew joined our beloved QE2 on her Final Voyage last November and we are pleased to advise you that 'QE2 - The Final Voyage' will be broadcast on BBC TWO's Timewatch series on Saturday 28 February 2009 at 8pm. We hope you enjoy the programme and that it will bring back fond memories of QE2.

brian daley
02-23-2009, 09:08 PM
The vessel shown is a barque and the men are taking in the lowest sail on the mizzenmast. This was called the crossjack ( pronounced crojack).
This is from a painting by Claude Muncaster, a marine artiost who knew his rigging.
BrianD

brian daley
02-23-2009, 09:26 PM
This is a Nippon Yuson Kaisha liner ,the Chichibu Maru. She was built in 1930 for the Orient /California service. A motor passengerliner of 17,000 tons she was 560 feet in length and had a beam of 74 feet and a depth of 42 foot 6 inches. A nice solid looking vessel. I wonder if she was lost in the second world war, anyone out there know her fate?

captain kong
02-23-2009, 10:14 PM
Here is me leaping aloft over the futtock shrouds, to furl sail on the ship Leuwin in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Australia,, I was 72 years old then, not bad for an old timer

captain kong
02-23-2009, 10:29 PM
The NYK Chichibu Maru was built in 1930
In 1934 she was renamed Tsingtao Maru, In 1944 sunk by US air attack off Luzon in the Pilipines

brian daley
02-23-2009, 11:40 PM
I knew I could rely on you guys,united we could write the book on International Maritime history. Thanks Cap'n,
BrianD

captain kong
02-24-2009, 03:23 PM
Here is a painting of the `Lusitania` alongside the Liverpool Landing stage and the `Mauretania` out in the River.also a painting of the Mauretania

Also a painting of the `Queen Mary 2` sailing in tandem, past the Statue of Liberty, New York with the `QE2`

The last painting is the old `Queen Elizabeth` in the Clyde

These paintings are on board the `Queen Mary 2`.

brian daley
02-24-2009, 10:35 PM
Wonderful pictures Cap'n,they underline the fact that great old ladies looked so much better in paint than in black and White.
P.S.,when is it you and Anne set out for Antartica?

captain kong
02-24-2009, 11:23 PM
Hi Brian ,
We leave home next Tuesday, 3 March .
We fly to Paris and then to Buenos Aires, Stay in hotel, for two days , Have a romp with Cleopatra and then Fly to Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, join the Minerva and then sail around Cape Horn and down to Anarctica. Deception Island, Elephant Island, South Georgia , Grytvicken , Tristan da Cunha, Nightingale Island and then to Cape Town.
The ship has a free bar. all the wine , beer and spirits are all inclusive. Nowt wrong with that. Get Home 27 March.
Cheers.Brian.

Trader
02-24-2009, 11:59 PM
Here is me leaping aloft over the futtock shrouds, to furl sail on the ship Leuwin in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Australia,, I was 72 years old then, not bad for an old timer

Hi Capt.Kong, Did you come across Iain Curphy when you were on the "Leuwin". He sails on her as Mate in between jobs on the Aussie coast and lives in Fremantle. He is the son of a mate of mine, Jack Curphy, who sailed on the Aussie coast for years and now has retired here to Dover.

Iain is now sailing as 2nd.Mate on a Scandinavian ship cruising the Caribean.

Alec.

captain kong
02-25-2009, 12:43 AM
Hi Alec I did meet most of the crew on there but dont recall the name, I wass most o0f the time with the Bosun/Shanty man, a scots fella, I have his card some where.
Enjoyed every minute on that ship.
Cheers. Brian

clancy
02-25-2009, 10:52 AM
Hi Brian ,
We leave home next Tuesday, 3 March .
We fly to Paris and then to Buenos Aires, Stay in hotel, for two days , Have a romp with Cleopatra and then Fly to Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, join the Minerva and then sail around Cape Horn and down to Anarctica. Deception Island, Elephant Island, South Georgia , Grytvicken , Tristan da Cunha, Nightingale Island and then to Cape Town.
The ship has a free bar. all the wine , beer and spirits are all inclusive. Nowt wrong with that. Get Home 27 March.
Cheers.Brian.

brian have a great time you will just be back in time for my birthday 28th you can get the round in cheers clancy

captain kong
02-25-2009, 06:28 PM
Thanks for that Clancy,
I`ll email you a bottle of scotch for your birthday

captain kong
02-26-2009, 02:01 PM
This is the Batillus, A French Shell Tanker , at the time the biggest ship in the world. 560,000-tons. on her maiden voyage, I flew out to her from CapeTown in July/August 1976 when I was flying with Court Helicopters in Cape Town. we circled her first and took photos then landed on the deck with stores. I walked aft with the papers and went on the bridge. I had been sailing on 250,000 tonners but they seemed like little coasters compared with this one. she was massive. I believe she was scrapped after a few years. they became dynosaurs.
Click on blank space below.

captain kong
02-26-2009, 06:46 PM
Liner row in New York from Pier 90 down. taken in the 50s.
Front to back,
Parthia, Caronia,[ green godess] Queen Mary, Britannic Flandre, United States, Constitution.

A sight never to be seen again.

liverbob
02-27-2009, 06:44 AM
too true cong,was there many times on the QE scythia and sylvania,also new jersey on the waiwera coming home fromnew zealand.

captain kong
02-27-2009, 10:43 PM
Here is a photo of the Queen Mary 2 , we were off the Pope Pious 11th Glacier in Chileno Antarctica in 2006.
I got a chunk of ice, 10,000 years old off the Glacier I melted some and it tasted beautiful, I also put a chunk in my whisky and it made it fizz. I still have some in a bottle at home here. The photo was taken from the lifeboat, Commodore Ron Warwick signed it for me.

brian daley
02-28-2009, 12:22 AM
The first picture is of the Royal Mail liner the "Asturias".Built in 1908 ,she is shown passing the Eddystone lighthouse and is illuminated by moonlight and a ships searchlight. She served as a hospital ship in WW1 and was torpedoed and severely damaged. She returned to service in 1923 and was scrapped in Japan in 1933.

The second picture shows the Booth liner "Hildebrand". Buiult in 1951 for the South American trade, the Three Graces in the background and the Alexandra tugs in the foregrouind make a very nostalgic scene ,she must be on the way home here.

captain kong
02-28-2009, 10:56 AM
good painting of the Hildebrand, she was wrecked on the Cascais outside of Lisbon, in fog, they didnt have radar then, in 1957. she was outward bound for Manaus 1000 miles up the Amazon.

roccija
02-28-2009, 02:14 PM
:)
Great pictures, -all of them.,-brings back many memories !!.
Thanks fellas !!.

Bob F :handclap: :handclap:

captain kong
02-28-2009, 03:33 PM
Here is a photo taken in the fifties of the QUEEN ELIZABETH approaching Pier 90 in New York.
By the gasometer, [not there now,] is the UNITED STATES and the other one is the INDEPENDENCE

Again the world will not see these ships again.

captain kong
02-28-2009, 04:14 PM
Here is one with a differenc.
I made this one of the grandchildren

It is called.

"I SEE NO SHARKS, NAOMI"

18stanley
02-28-2009, 04:38 PM
Fascinating pictures all, not to mention the accompanying info from time
to time. Apropos, has anyone got photos of a ship that intrigued me in the
30's and I've never forgotten since. During my frequent meanderings along
the Dock Road I often wondered whether I was going to see it - and
frequently did. Name El Uruguayo and always berthed close to the entrance
of Brocklebank/Canada if memory serves me right, so you could get a good
view of it through the gates. Apart from the romantic name I was always
impressed by rhe funnel with its Maltese Cross. Any info about it would also
be welcome, especially about what happened to it laterwhen I should imagine
it had to play its part in the war effort like so many others of its ilk that plied
their trade from Liverpool in those long ago days.
There was also I think a sister ship, El Parugayo. I looked and looked
for it to no avail.Was it also based in Liverpool but in another part of the
Docks? If so, does anyone also remember it? And know what happened to it?
Many thanks Stan H.
PS - hope you have a wonderful holiday, Cap'n!

captain kong
02-28-2009, 06:34 PM
Here we are, the ships themselves. `El Paraguaya `and the `El Uruguaya `
They were owned by Houlder Brothers for the meat and grain trade with South America. I cannot find any information of these two ships, or their fate.
Photos courtesey of
www.photoship.co.uk/Ship List/index.html
Thank you

Waterways
03-01-2009, 01:30 AM
`El Paraguaya`and the `El Uruguaya and in the ship list as `El Paraguayo`and the `El Uruguayo`. Sister ships built 1912 and scrapped 1937. Houlder Line disappeared in 1947.

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/houlder.htm

captain kong
03-01-2009, 10:37 AM
OK so I get 8 out of 10 for spelling

18stanley
03-03-2009, 06:57 PM
Thanks Waterways for that extra info. Their demise coincided with "my
leaving of Liverpool"! And the Houlder Line has also gone! Sic transit...
Stan H.

brian daley
03-04-2009, 12:03 AM
I am not sure of which thread to put this post as it kind of crosses boundaries,however!. Last week I was invited to dinner with a lot of gentlemen from similar backgrounds ,but of varying ages, from sixty up into the eighties. By serendipity I found myself supping aperitfs with with a fellow emigre. He was in his eighties and had led a fairly colourful life. From Robey, he left college and became an engineering cadet with Houlder Bros. In 1936 he met one of the Houlder Brothers,John, who offered him some advice. Remember this was before World War Two,war was'nt in the offing and Britain was in a recession then. John Houlder told this young man to leave the Merchant Navy because British shipowners would have to start "Flagging Out",that is to say ,moving their ships out of Britain and registering in places like Panama. He told the young cadet that they would be employing people from third world countries to save money. Stan left the Merchant Navy upon John Houlders advice and got a position in the City Engineers Department,and this is where the crossover comes in. He rose rapidly through the the ranks and soon became a young "Blocker" I should say that the young mans full name was Stanley Butterworth, for those of you who like to ferret through the archives.
Stan and I spoke of the religious divide that used to be strong in our old home. He told me that some of the council depots where totally Orange whilst others where totally green. There was one Depot manager by the name of Duffy who had all his men in the same Orange Lodge as he was in.
If a protestant depot manager found a left wing trouble maker in his employ( and that person would have been a protestant to have got a job there) he would get Stan to transfer the individual to a catholic depot where he would last just a few days before asking for his cards.The catholics did vice versa manitaining a kind of balance. Stan left Liverpool after the war to settle for the City Engineers job in Birmingham.
John Houlders advice was precipitate,had not the war intervened we would have lost our fleet a lot earlier.

Waterways
03-04-2009, 01:40 AM
One of the prime means of the city's decline was flags of convenience. The governments should never have gone along with it. To save money the shipowners would have modernised their fleets to the the most state-of-the-art and innovative around. Instead they used cheap labour and created unemployment at home. British ship design post war was old hat and never progressed much at all.

The shipping industry had far too much influence in government circles.

What is a "blocker".

brian daley
03-04-2009, 07:54 AM
Have I been away from Liverpool "that long"?. A blocker was a name given to any one in a supervisory or managerial position. To emphasise their status,these people would wear Bowler hats ,or Homburgs, which were known as "Blockers". A hat was shaped by "blocking" and the term somehow was transferred to people who could afford to buy them i.e. the bosses.
I am sad to hear the sobriquet has been lost ,especially as I have got the "blockers" job at last!

backsplice
03-04-2009, 09:03 AM
'Blocker' is still in use in Cammell Lairds, where a mate of mine is a foreman plater. Although the bowler hats went out of the window back in the sixties to be replaced with hard hats, currently colour coded to denote trade etc.
Backsplice

brian daley
03-04-2009, 11:18 PM
For tonights delectation we have the Pacific Steam Navigation Co,'s "Panama" 0f 1902 ,she is shown here in her WW1 dazzle camouflage when she was acting as an Auxilliary Transport vessel,she then became a Hospital ship and after the war she was bought by the Admiralty and used in that capacity right up until 1948 when she was scrapped.
Then we have the fabulous Mauretania ,a product of Cammell Lairds in 1939 .She is shown here in that short period before the outbreak of WW11,during which she helped the war effort as a troopship. She became the Grand Old Lady of the Atlantic and gave sterling service until she was broken up in 1965.

brian daley
03-05-2009, 11:43 PM
The turret steamship Mersario was built in 1906 by Doxfords of Sunderland. Maclay and McIntyre of glasgow owned her and she is shown here in the Grand Harbour of Valetta in a painting by the Maltese Artist Gaetano d'Esposito one of the foremost ship artists at that time

brian daley
03-05-2009, 11:54 PM
The freighter Chinese Prince was built in 1926 by the Deutsche Werk A.G. of Hamburg for the Rio Cape line,a subsidiary of Furness Withy's Groups Prince Line,of which she was the third of what would eventually be four succesive ships to bear that name. Her end came at the hands of the Germans when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean in June !941 by the U-552. A total of 45 people were slain out of a crew of 64.
This picture was painted by the Japanese artist H. Shimidzu showing Mount Fujiyama in the background

brian daley
03-06-2009, 11:59 PM
Here for you ship lovers are two more classic pics. First we have an oil tanker ,the British Councillor ,built in 1922 for the British Tanker Co.
She met her end in 1940 when she was sank by a torpedo from an E-boat off Spurn Head.
The second picture shows the Cunard liners Aquitania and Queen Mary,camouflaged in their wartime grey ,in the Clyde Anchorage Emergency Port, getting ready to undertake troopship duties during WW11.

Ken Berry
05-11-2009, 10:59 AM
Hi All You Guys,
Now I have got rid of the Mersey mist out of my eyes.What a great site to be able to read.Well first about being up the mast on a square rigger.They were mad those guys, when late March 1956 I was on a New Zealand Coaster M.V. Holmglen on delivery to NZ.We had been delayed for over 2 months,with being frozen in the Canal out of Hoogezand North Holland.Built in the Bodewes Shipyard.We manged 4 Miles backward off Finnisterre in 24 Hours in a real howler.The following night there had been this booming sound coming from For'ward.In the Engine room the MAN 8 cylinder engine I still reckon gave a small jump with each boom.I got the Short straw as she had more engineers tickets between the 3 of use than the QE2.So when the 2nd arrived down he asked what that Booming noise was,he actually thought he was dreaming it.But decided differently pretty quickly. I turned in pretty quickly and was just settling nicely when Chief comes in and tells me we have to get up for'ward as the hull is going one way and the for'ward mast the other way in the rolls.Anyway we managed to get to the lower turnbuckles and they couldn't be tightened any more as obviously the yard had saved their efforts rather than use the top turnbuckles.So Maurice and myself had to go up the ladder on the mast and tighten the top turnbuckles.
We made it OK but I will always rememberCaptain Keith the Super and Old man for the Home trip.saying "He would have sworn at times we were only hanging on by our arms at times".No way we told him our legs were wrapped round the mast that tight that it took longer for to get our legs loose than it did to tighten the turnbuckles.We matched the Old Clipper record of 63 days.Captain Kong did you know an Eric Watts with Cunard he was a First Officer.I used to visit him quite a lot 2 years ago.He had been crook for a fair while.Some one mentioned the Whale Back hull or Turret hull.My Maternal G/father was on the S.S.Sagamore,3rd, Engineer WW1 when she was torpedoed 3rd,March 1917.He was 1 of only 7 survivors picked up by the S.S.Deucalion 12th,March 1917.He ended up losing his lower limbs to just below his knees.have you any photos of her.I have a couple pre 1912,but she had passenger accomodation for 60 added.My Dad didn't know what he missed by not going to Sea.He is the only one out of a hell of a lot of the male rellies who did.Thanks guys for a great evenng reading,viewing and reminissing.Best Regards Ken B

captain kong
05-11-2009, 06:43 PM
Hi Ken,
thanks for interesting letter.
Here is a photo of the SAGAMORE, I think it will be the one, it is from the pre first WW days.
PHOTO IS FROM THE "OLD SHIP PICTURE GALLERIES" with thanks to them.

You mentioned Sailing ships, My brother sailed on one on the Australian and New Zealand coasts. it was the `WONGALA`, she was a `Powder Boat` carrying explosives around the coasts. She was reputed to have been more of a submarine than a sailing ship, she would go down off Sydney Heads and surface off New Zealand 12 days later.
She ended up on a reef off Thursday Island.

I dont know Eric Watts of Cunard, there was a Captain called Frederick Watts, he was Master of the Caronia.around 1960 ish.

captain kong
06-12-2009, 11:36 AM
We had a meeting with `ar Bob from Ontario, Canada, at the Eldonian Club yesterday. A few bevies sunk and lamps swung.
Here are some photos.

me, Bob, Ernie, then Bob and his mate from Wallasey, then Bob and his mate again , then Bob meeting a fellow Russian Convoy Veteran.

brian daley
06-28-2009, 11:40 PM
This is a picture of the S.S. Nagoya,a P&O liner built just before the First World war. She was on the Far East run to India ,China and Japan. She did a short spell as a hospital ship on the North Russian coast in 1918 ( was she treating the British who were wounded during the Russian Civil War ?)
She is shown here going to the breakers yard in Yokohama in 1932,a very sad end to an illustrious career.

brian daley
07-06-2009, 01:38 AM
Here's a picture to evoke some memories;a Maggie Booth liner that was built on Merseyside in 1958.She ran a regular schedule from Liverpool to Lisbon,Barbados and the River Amazon ,all the way to Manaus. How many of you salt waterrmen sailed on her?

brian daley
07-10-2009, 02:22 PM
This is a picture of the steamship Defender,one the Harrison Line that sailed out of Liverpool,She is shown heading into the Mersey passing New Brighton.
The little coaster in the foreground seems minute in comparison with the Defender; note the columns of smoke from the other vessels on the river, this was painted in the Merseys heydays.
BrianD

brian daley
07-11-2009, 08:55 PM
Heres a graceful old timer;built by Denny Bros in Dumbarton she saw service with the Southern Railway from 1924 under the name of Dinard.She is shown here in her wartime colours as a hospital ship. She returned to ferrying in peacetime and worked the Dover /Boulogne route until 1968. The Finns bought her and renamed her Viking and did ferrying in the Gulf of Bothnia until 1970 when she was sold for scrap.46 years service,they built them to last back then!
BrianD

captain kong
07-11-2009, 11:28 PM
Here are two old vessels of a bygone age that are still afloat.
`Balclutha` British built, preserved in San Francisco.
and the British built`Fals of Clyde` preserved in Honolulu, Hawaii. she was converted to an oil tanker and cargo ship. I have been onboard them a few times and are very interesting ships.
Why cant the British preserve ships???

brian daley
07-15-2009, 01:19 AM
Here's a golden oldie,The Monarch of Bermuda of Furness Withy lines.Built at Newcastle on Tyne in 1931 she was one of the first luxury cruise liners,an all electric vessel she weighed 22424 tons and served on the New York /Caribbean run for very many years. An awful lot of Merseysiders crewed her in that time.

ChrisGeorge
07-15-2009, 03:10 AM
Super thread here! Wonderful to explore Liverpool's maritime heritage in this way. Thanks, Brian and everyone! :handclap:

Chris :PDT_Aliboronz_24:

brian daley
07-15-2009, 02:48 PM
Here is a seldom seen shot, none of you Vindi boys will recognise it;it is the old Gravesend sea training school. I spent a couple of very happy weeks there in 1958 .I was at the Vindi but spent two weeks at Gravesend training for the Armistice Parade. The boys who attended Gravesend were called 'peanuts' because they were not allowed to go about in more than groups of two. The thing I liked about Gravesend was the view of the river. Situated opposite Tilbury it afforded a view of the great liners that travelled up the Thames as well as the cargo boats and barges .The vessel on the river here is the 4 masted barque Olivebank, at 2795 tons she was part of the Erilson's grain fleet and was registered at Mariehamn.
BrianD

brian daley
07-15-2009, 03:15 PM
This is a shot of the old passenger landing stage down you know where.
I remember it like this when we went on our shool trip to the Isle of Man.I also tied up here when I was with Cunard and Canadian Pacific. What a wonderful place it was then. It was bustling with porters and the vans from the chandling companies, mostly horse drawn then. I hope the new landing stage provides the same kind of "busyness". It would be great to see more of the modern liners plying their trade from there........
BrianD

Paddy
07-15-2009, 07:57 PM
I remember in the early sixties this time of year going over to Belfast. On arrival at the Pier Head the cobblestone was criss crossed with tram lines. The excitement of boarding the Irish boat was immense and claiming the top bunk in the cabin was all important. We would get there about nine o clock at night the evening summery and light. We would go up on deck before she set sail. Liverpool to my young mind was an all important place and a great city to come from. I have never lossed that feeling about the place. Sailing up the river it would be dark and the nights journey was ahead of us as we retired to the cabins. All excitement and fun. In the morning at first light we would go out on to the top deck and look at the approaching coast line of Ireland sheer delight as we sailed into Belfast. We would count the forty shades of green from under the bridge, as the rural shades made themselves manifest. Our Kid always insisted that there was forty one a dispute that could not be settled. And then docking at Belfast and once again cobblestones criss crossed with tram lines and away in the van. Lisbon, Lurgan, Armagh, Omagh, Portadown, and into Donegal the sheer joy of being a boy in summer.

brian daley
07-16-2009, 10:06 PM
This picture brings to mind the lines of John Masefields wonderful poem "Sea Fever" The coastal vessel pictured is the 'Cromarty Firth',built at Ardrossan in 1919 for the B
Border Shipping Company. Come on now ,all together "Dirty British coaster ,with a salt caked smokestack,ploughing through the Channel on a mad March day............................................... ........................."
BrianD

Paddy
07-16-2009, 11:41 PM
I loved the narrative verse of Masefield as a lad Brian. Masefield was the first poet I mastered in English lit. The Everlasting Mercy, Reynard the Fox, Widow in the Bye Street, and of cause the great seafairing narrative The Dauber. I was in Dorchester Museum perusing the Hardy room when my eyes caught a model of a sailing ship it was very intricate and had been put together with great care. There was an inscription with the information that Masefield had put it together as a present for Hardy.I could not help feeling a slght envy or to be kinder to myself a frustration that such a great poet could be also such a fine craftsman. 'Tear your heart out' 'Don't give up your day job Jude' Still I came away with the knowledge that I know the works of the both writers who gave such a great contribution to English lit. And I did once build a Spitfire!

brian daley
07-17-2009, 12:23 AM
You know Paddy,Captain Kong is a bit like what you essayed about Masefield.
Old Kong can write up a storm,compose narrative poetry and is quite a dab hand with artists brushes. He started out as a deck boy and worked his way up to being master on the big bulk carriers. He is a Thames pilot,ditto Mersey
and was an expert witness at the Marchioness inquiry. Being flippant,I wrote on another site that if he had been born in another age he might have been a master swordsman too. He replied that he had to use a sword when some pirates attempted to board a ship he was on. He is a polymath and I hate him, bleedin' $?&*+?**!!!
Was that an Airfix Spitfire that you built?, I constructed one for my son 33 years ago ;ended up with my fingers glued together

Paddy
07-17-2009, 01:10 AM
Yeah it was Airfix but I did it quite well even if it was one I dismantled after Our Kid had made it. Thing is, I never had the instructions. Kong and others seem to have a knack at adapting. I am suprised he never became a pirate himself.

brian daley
07-19-2009, 09:33 PM
This vessel was built in Garston ,on the Mersey in 1902. Originally named the British Monarch for her Liverpool owners,she was sold to the Ribble Shipping Company in 1909 and renamed the Ribblesdale.She is shown here in that conpanys' colours. I don't doubt that Captain Kong served on her ,perhaps he'll let us know!!
BrianD

Ron Ham
07-20-2009, 03:26 PM
Hi Brian , I sailed on 3 duplicate vessels of that type & always in Winter ! The Wheatcrop ,Sprayville & Rockville , can I qualify as an ancient mariner too ! Good to see you on your feet again . :PDT_Piratz_26:Ron

brian daley
07-20-2009, 06:52 PM
You Certainly can call yourself an old salt Ron, when you get a bit of time tell us about your experience; you'll find a great deal of people would like to know what it was like on those coal scuttles,
Cheers
BrianD

captain kong
07-21-2009, 10:17 PM
Here is the Sprayville Ron.
I was on one just like it, The`BEECHFIELD` one of Savages.Zillah Steamship Company of Liverpool in 1952, I was O.S. then AB then the COOK then coal burning Fireman. It was a ten year voyage lasting four weeks. You can read the account of the trip in SHIPS and the Sea thread.

brian daley
07-24-2009, 12:03 AM
Here is a painting of one of the famous Yankee Black Ball clippers,the Montezuma. She was built in the days when "men of iron manned ships of wood". She could mange 16 knots on a good day but the regime was tough. Black Ball ships were noted for their tough Mates,Bully Baines being the most famous, Shantymen still sing of his brutality, a paradox......beautiful ships ,run by brutes.
BrianD

brian daley
07-24-2009, 10:23 PM
This here is a picture of a Highland class ship belonging to the Nelson Line. The Nelson Line was a subsidiary of the Royal Mail Line and any more than that I do not know. Any of you old salts ever hear tell of the Nelson Line? I enlarged the picture to the maximum possible but could not make out her name. Nevertheless, I think it is a lovely picture,the scene could possibly be off Portugal judging by the rig on that vessek in the foreground. Ring a bell with anyone?
BrianD

brian daley
07-26-2009, 09:39 PM
Herew is a painting of one of the most beautiful liners to ever sail the blue. It is the French liner Normandie;shown here in 1935 when she was about to leave Le Havre for the States. She came to a very sad end during WW11,a victim of sabotage in New York? Like the Atlantic greyhounds of that era,she combined style and opulence in a way that will never be seen again,
BrianD

Trader
07-27-2009, 12:06 AM
This here is a picture of a Highland class ship belonging to the Nelson Line. The Nelson Line was a subsidiary of the Royal Mail Line and any more than that I do not know. Any of you old salts ever hear tell of the Nelson Line? I enlarged the picture to the maximum possible but could not make out her name. Nevertheless, I think it is a lovely picture,the scene could possibly be off Portugal judging by the rig on that vessek in the foreground. Ring a bell with anyone?
BrianD

Hi Brian,

Over the years I have heard of the Nelson Line and the Highland boats. They had five built at Harland and Wolffs, Belfast between 1928 and 1932. They were Highland Monarch 1928, Chieftain 1929, Brigade 1929, Princess 1930 and Patriot 1932. They were identical so your picture could be any one of them.

I read a good article on them at www.merchantnavyofficers.com if you scroll down the left hand side you will see Nelson Line History.


Alec.

brian daley
07-27-2009, 10:07 PM
Hi Trader,
I had a look at the MN officers site, the Nelson liner that looks most likely to be the one I have shown is the Highland Princess. Thanks for that.
Here we have a great painting of the Chilean nitrate port of Iquique.The ship which is stern on to us is the Cambrian Chieftain of 1885. In 1894 she was carrying a cargo of coal and in a storm the cargo shifted. Some of her crew,including the Masters wife ,were taken off by the barque Dee. It was thought that she was lost and the insurance company was on the point of paying for her loss when news reached London that she had arrived safely in Taltal,Chile. This painting was done by the marine artist Mark Myers,
BrianD

brian daley
07-30-2009, 01:28 AM
This is a wonderful view of the Three Graces. It was taken in 1930 and is clearly a shot taken from the boat deck of a liner, but which liner I do not know; the Titanic monument can be seen in the middle ground and seek how tidy the landing stage looks,
BrianD

Paddy
07-30-2009, 01:56 AM
How do ships float?

Samsette
07-30-2009, 02:20 AM
By maintaining their watertight integrity, through proper maintenance and avoiding rocks, shoals and colliding with other ships, as starters.:PDT11

wsteve55
07-30-2009, 06:28 PM
By not sinking!

George
07-30-2009, 06:36 PM
How do ships float?

<Archimedes mode on>
Buoyancy

brian daley
07-30-2009, 06:38 PM
Or...................................whatever floats your boat!!!!!!

wsteve55
07-30-2009, 06:42 PM
Or...........whatever boats you float:unibrow:

wsteve55
07-30-2009, 06:45 PM
Next.....how do sea-gulls fly?

brian daley
08-12-2009, 12:45 AM
I posted this picture on another site and thought that I would share it with you. It shows a 4 masted barque running before a gale, It was painted in 1910 by Thomas Somerscales and he has managed to capture the nature of that awful storm.

pablo42
08-12-2009, 01:42 AM
I posted this picture on another site and thought that I would share it with you. It shows a 4 masted barque running before a gale, It was painted in 1910 by Thomas Somerscales and he has managed to capture the nature of that awful storm.

Nice picture Brian.

kevin
08-12-2009, 11:12 AM
Are they serious?

pablo42
08-12-2009, 11:34 AM
Ha, nice one Kev.

Billy D
08-12-2009, 04:44 PM
LOL

kevin
08-12-2009, 07:07 PM
Any suggestions about the type of spanner I'd need?

captain kong
08-12-2009, 08:34 PM
This might be a bum steer but would a ba*ta*d spanner be right? but mind the `nuts`.

captain kong
08-12-2009, 08:41 PM
Here is a photo of Liner Row in New York in the 50s. it can never ever happen again.
Bottom up.........
Media/Parthia, Caronia, [ Green Godess ], Queen Mary, Britannic, Liberte, America, Constitution.
Only Queen Mary survives as a hotel in Long Beach Cal. USA.

brian daley
08-13-2009, 12:29 AM
Any suggestions about the type of spanner I'd need?

Hi Kevin,
how about a ring spanner?

pablo42
08-13-2009, 12:38 AM
Guess you'd know more about that than me.

kevin
08-13-2009, 08:59 AM
Hi Kevin,
how about a ring spanner?

Give that man a coconut - right answer!

captain kong
08-25-2009, 01:31 PM
Here are four pictures of a famous White Star Liner, `M.V. GEORGIC,` the last to be built for the White Star Line in 1932 then in 1934 Cunard Steamship Company took over White Star to become the Cunard White Star Line.
First picture is when she was new on Maiden Voyage, 2nd is when she was bombed and set on fire in Suez Bay with 800 Italian POWs on board, a very large death toll in 1941, then the 3rd is after the fire and she is beached, the 4th is as she was when I sailed on her in 1955 taking emmigrants from Liverpool to Australia, Australian troops, 2RAR, to Malaya and the French Foreign Legion from the Meekong in what was French Indo China renamed Viet Nam, to Algiers and Mersailes, France.
Then we took her to the breakers on the Clyde on December 15 1955.
She was a good job sorry to see her go.

captain kong
08-25-2009, 07:15 PM
Here is a good link to many famous ships.

www.shipgeek.com

brian daley
08-25-2009, 11:42 PM
Hi BrianA, here's a picture that will bring back a few memories, walking under the El to get back to your berth.Teetering on the cobblestones after one beer too many in the Diner. Great days eh?

Jeff Glasser
08-27-2009, 07:16 PM
Nice pic Brian,
I especially like the cars which I think are a couple of '59 Fords (cabs?) with centre stage a '57 Oldsmobile. That might even be a late '50's Dodge or Plymouth behind. I do love old Yank cars!

When was the photo' taken? around 1959-60.

Hope you're still well.

Jeff

brian daley
08-28-2009, 12:53 AM
Hi Jeff,'59 was right,makes you feel ancient when you realise that was half a century ago. Anyway ,this picture here was from an earlier period; painted in 1910 by Thomas Somerscales,it shows a four masted barque running before the wind. Nothing romantic about that ships situation, if she pooped one she could founder and all would be lost,great picture though,
BrianD

Waterways
08-28-2009, 01:41 AM
Here is a photo of Liner Row in New York in the 50s. it can never ever happen again.
Bottom up.........
Media/Parthia, Caronia, [ Green Godess ], Queen Mary, Britannic, Flandres, America, Constitution.
Only Queen Mary survives as a hotel in Long Beach Cal. USA.

Flandres? are you sure? :)

captain kong
08-28-2009, 02:05 PM
Liberte, ex Europa. French Line from 1950 to 1961.
50 years since I last saw them.

kevin
08-29-2009, 11:10 AM
Hi Jeff,'59 was right,makes you feel ancient when you realise that was half a century ago. Anyway ,this picture here was from an earlier period; painted in 1910 by Thomas Somerscales,it shows a four masted barque running before the wind. Nothing romantic about that ships situation, if she pooped one she could founder and all would be lost,great picture though,
BrianD

Hi Brian,
I was out your way yesterday - a wedding at Packington Moor Farm.
Kevin

brian daley
08-29-2009, 09:59 PM
Hi Kevin ,we'll have to have a pint of Lumphammer sometime,I have'nt been over to the Black Country this year,
BrianD

kevin
08-30-2009, 12:00 PM
Hi Kevin ,we'll have to have a pint of Lumphammer sometime,I have'nt been over to the Black Country this year,
BrianD

Anytime you'll be in the vicinity, let me know - only 5 minutes away from Mad O'Rorke's.

captain kong
08-30-2009, 06:32 PM
ss Helenus off Fujiyama.
water colours on silk by H Shimidzu in 1925, famous Japanese artist.of Yokohama.

Helenus, 7,555 grt built in Greenock in 1913, for Ocean Steam Ship Co. of Alfred Holt of Liverpool
Helenus survived three U-boat attacks during WW1 but was sunk by U-69 in WW2 in South Atlantic on March 3, 1942

brian daley
08-30-2009, 06:55 PM
Wonderful painting Brian, let's hope some of the crowd show us a few of their hidden gems,
BrianD

bangorreg
08-31-2009, 01:26 AM
Hi An old photo taken by me g-father about 1914 I think the ship was the Ancon or Amcon?

captain kong
08-31-2009, 10:29 AM
Hi Reg.
The Ship was the `ss Ancon`, first passage through the Panama Canal on August 15 1914, it was making the first official Ocean to Ocean passage.
She was owned by the Panama Railroad Company
Cheers
Brian

bangorreg
08-31-2009, 11:29 AM
Hi Reg.
The Ship was the `ss Ancon`, first passage through the Panama Canal on August 15 1914, it was making the first official Ocean to Ocean passage.
She was owned by the Panama Railroad Company
Cheers
Brian
Thank's brian,
He was one of many legal solicitor's working on behalf of the NAPIER SHIPPING CO .
Reg.

captain kong
09-05-2009, 04:36 PM
THE 256,000 TON TANKER, ESSO NORTHUMBRIA, heading south towards the Cape of Good Hope shipping a sea, I was Third Mate on watch when I took the photo in 1976, Second photo, ESSO NORTHUMBRIA`S bow towering over the houses on Tyneside when being built in 1969.

brian daley
09-09-2009, 02:04 PM
Here is a wonderful painting of Cunards Blue Riband champion, the Mauretania. Built in 1904 she served succesfully on the Trans Atlantic run for very many years.tThis picture was painted by Montague Dawson.

brian daley
09-12-2009, 01:14 AM
Here is a painting of Brunel's Great Western arriving in New York April 1848. She commenced a very succesful stemship service Between Britain and America. The painting was executed by Mark Myers.
BrianD

captain kong
09-12-2009, 03:21 PM
As it is the anniversary of the attack on the Twin Trade Towers, in New York, here is a view of Ground Zero I took a few months ago. showing the progress.

wsteve55
09-12-2009, 08:21 PM
What is it they're building,in it's place?

captain kong
09-18-2009, 06:56 PM
An old photo of Sir Ernest Shackleton leaving his men at Point Wild on Elephant Island to sail in that open boat 800 miles across the Weddell Sea and the Scotia Sea to South Georgia to get help after Endurance was lost after being crushed in the ice, it took him 22 months to return to the rescue.

2nd Photo, Me at Point Wild on Elephant Island an evil and desolate place . There is a plaque screwed into the that rock face commemerating the event.

3rd Photo, Ernest Shackleton`s grave at Grytviken, South Georgia, he died in January 1922, When I was there in March we had a service at the graveside and then a toast of Rum, a final tot of Rum was poured on his grave, an old tradition.

Billy D
09-19-2009, 10:54 AM
Remembered this thread when i was in a solicitors,,,LOL

THIS WAS HANGING ON THE WALL,,,,,,,,,,,

The Soren Larson,,,,,Passing the Fort Perch Rock,,,,,,,,,,,

http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/vv138/Ronin2009/TheSorenLarson.jpg

brian daley
09-19-2009, 12:15 PM
Great picture Billy, some kind person out there may be able to fill in the details.
Er, ey Cap'n Kong, who took the picture of the big red penguin?
BrianD

captain kong
09-19-2009, 01:01 PM
Tall Ship Soren Larsen Sailing adventure for all ages
2 Jun 2009 ... Tall Ship Soren Larsen - New Zealand and South Pacific island sailing adventure. Sail training for people of all ages in Auckland, ...
www.sorenlarsen.co.nz/
ALL ABOUT IT, CREW WANTED AS WELL. WHEN I HAVE HAD MY OPERATION ON 8 OCTOBER I MAY APPLY FOR IT,

captain kong
09-19-2009, 02:54 PM
Here is an old painting of the troop ship, HMS Birkenhead, on the Rock off the Cape of Good Hope. This is when the famous saying, Women and Children first, or the Birkenhead drill came into being.

pablo42
09-19-2009, 03:50 PM
Brave men indeed. Finest traditions of the Army.

brian daley
09-19-2009, 08:31 PM
Here is a painting of that awful sinking when445 lives were lost. Yes Popeye,it was British military discipline that helped save lives ,a fact we can feel proud of. The painting is unattributed,
BrianD

captain kong
09-21-2009, 01:45 PM
Here is a piece of the original teak deck of the old QUEEN MARY.
On Saturday, 26 September it is the 75th Anniversary of her launching.
26 September 1934.
There are only four of these pieces of inscribed teak from her deck commemorating the 70th Anniversary. There are others but not inscribed as this one.
There is one in the Glasgow Museum, one in the John Brown Shipbuilders Museum, Commodore Ron Warwick has one, his father Commodore W.E, Warwick was Master of her, and I have the other one.
It was presented to me by Lovetta Kramer, Executive Director of The RMS Queen Mary Foundation, of Long Beach, California, USA.when I was onboard in 2004.

brian daley
10-07-2009, 10:34 PM
Here is another golden oldie,you'll recognise this one right away Cap'n Kong,the old Empress of Britain. It is a lovely poster but was she a lovely ship?
BrianD

wsteve55
10-08-2009, 12:01 AM
Anyone here familiar with the magazine,"Sea Breezes"? Someone I know,picked up a copy from 1957,at a flea market in Lark lane!Some interesting nautical stuff in it,and I wondered if it's still going?

captain kong
10-08-2009, 12:30 AM
I have every Sea Breeze since January 1950 to 2002 ,I had to stop it I have thousands of them including SHIPS annd many others.

I am going into hospital in 8 hours for an operation. due to my encounter with that Bull Elephant Seal in the ANTARCTIC in March this year. see you all later.

Waterways
10-08-2009, 12:34 AM
I hope the op goes well. :)

pablo42
10-08-2009, 01:02 AM
I have every Sea Breeze since January 1950 to 2002 ,I had to stop it I have thousands of them including SHIPS annd many others.

I am going into hospital in 8 hours for an operation. due to my encounter with that Bull Elephant Seal in the ANTARCTIC in March this year. see you all later.

I tried to sleep with one of those Bull Elephant seals once. Know how you feel...

captain kong
10-08-2009, 09:40 AM
Thanks for that WW.


Pablo, the Bull thought I was after his Cows, but if you smell them they are awful, just like some young ladies I once knew in Sydney. like `Port Boat Mary.`

Here is the Bull with his cows below just before the attack. These fellows can move faster than a man can run but only for short spells and can weigh up to five tons.

pablo42
10-08-2009, 11:51 AM
Thanks for that WW.


Pablo, the Bull thought I was after his Cows, but if you smell them they are awful, just like some young ladies I once knew in Sydney. like `Port Boat Mary.`

Here is the Bull with his cows below just before the attack. These fellows can move faster than a man can run but only for short spells and can weigh up to five tons.

Thanks Captain. Also better looking than some of women I've been with. Get well soon.

brian daley
10-08-2009, 04:36 PM
All the best Brian, we'll be thinking of you mate.

My ops beenm cancelled,specialist my ticker is'nt strong enough for sedation.
Anyway get back soon ,we want to hear more your yarns !
BrianD

santos
10-08-2009, 08:30 PM
Good luck Brian, look forward to your return to us.

Kind regards

Chris.

ItsaZappathing
10-08-2009, 11:16 PM
Good luck Capt:PDT11

wsteve55
10-08-2009, 11:39 PM
Probably,Captain,you've been in and out,by now, so I hope all's fine!:nod:

bangorreg
10-09-2009, 09:25 AM
Hi Capiain Kong.

Captain Kong was driven off course by a storm?His vessel smashed into
a small island. The next morning, he awoke on the beach.

The sand and sky were reddish. Walking around in a daze, the

CaptaIn saw red birds, red grass, red trees and red bananas.

He was shocked to find that even his skin was reddish.

He could not work it out, but remembered he had been all night with a few Red Indian female companion's at the local gin joint?

Get better soon.
Reg

wsteve55
10-09-2009, 04:24 PM
Maybe Cap' would like to tell us about that one,when he comes back?!:unibrow:

ItsaZappathing
10-09-2009, 06:05 PM
I have every Sea Breeze since January 1950 to 2002 ,I had to stop it I have thousands of them including SHIPS annd many others.

I am going into hospital in 8 hours for an operation. due to my encounter with that Bull Elephant Seal in the ANTARCTIC in March this year. see you all later.

Hope all went well Capt.:PDT_Piratz_26:

Tom"O"
10-09-2009, 07:10 PM
[QUOTE=wsteve55;,"Sea Breezes"? and I wondered if it's still going]

Still going Steve though a bit pricey.

wsteve55
10-10-2009, 02:26 AM
[QUOTE=wsteve55;,"Sea Breezes"? and I wondered if it's still going]

Still going Steve though a bit pricey.

Hi Tom"o",
I'm surprised really,with our U.K.merchant navy,apparently disappearing,I wouldn't have thought there would be much of a market? The copy I was looking at cost 1/6p! :nod:

P.S. I notice your avatar is a pic' of the Pooley gates,have you heard what's happening to them?

bangorreg
10-11-2009, 06:25 AM
[QUOTE=Tom"O";193596]

Hi Tom"o",
I'm surprised really,with our U.K.merchant navy,apparently disappearing,I wouldn't have thought there would be much of a market? The copy I was looking at cost 1/6p! :nod:

P.S. I notice your avatar is a pic' of the Pooley gates,have you heard what's happening to them?
Hi RE Tom'O Avatar ( This is a bit off topic) but
I think the following site may help.
http://www.liverpoolmonuments.co.uk/gates/pooley12.html

Reg.

wsteve55
10-13-2009, 09:45 PM
Thanks for that Bangorreg,some interesting articles!:nod:

brian daley
10-19-2009, 02:05 PM
A good friend of mine,Richie Bradshaw,tells me that the HMS Illustious is due to visit Liverpool very soon, well here's a pic of her ancestor ,and in the background you can that other merseyside marvel,the HMS Ark Royal . The picture was in an old War Illustrated so it is a bit poor compared to modern pics.
BrianD

pablo42
10-19-2009, 02:41 PM
Don't make ships like that no more Brian. I was in Norfolk Virginia a while back and got some tours of the American fleet. Had a great day on the Nimitz and had a tour around the Missouri. I seen her in action in Lebanon. Mighty impressive. Love them old warships. Seen the results of her in Bekkaa Valley, jeez, glad I was on her side.

captain kong
10-19-2009, 05:52 PM
Hi Pablo I did a tour of the Missouri 18 months ago, she was moored astern of the wreck memorial Arizona in Pearl Harbour. A big, big ship. As you say, you would not have enjoyed being on the recieving end of those big guns.
I will be going to Norfolk Virginia next summer to visit some friends there, they live right on the river with views of the US Navy berths.

She is now having a $18,000,000 `make over` in dry dock.

off Google..............


'Mighty Mo' undergoing $18M preservation
By JAYMES SONG (AP) ? 3 days ago

HONOLULU ? Mike Weidenbach has walked across the historic teakwood decks and through the metal hallways of the USS Missouri countless times in the past decade. But he recently realized how massive the aging battleship is from a new perspective ? underneath.

"I touched the bottom of the ship," gushed Weidenbach, curator of the iconic World War II vessel that now serves as a memorial and museum.

The "Mighty Mo" ? the last battleship built by the United States ? is spending three months in dry dock at Pearl Harbor undergoing $18 million in maintenance and preservation.

"I want it to be here forever," Weidenbach said Thursday. "I want to die knowing we took care of the ship the best we were able.

"For me as curator, this is our primary artifact, so it's not like a normal Navy ship that has a life span of decades," he said. "This is supposed to be like the U.S. Constitution. It's supposed to be hundreds of years."

Weidenbach visited the ship at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and said it was challenging to capture the size and scope of the 887-foot vessel in a photograph.

"It was overwhelming," he said. "It's bigger than you can see. I've seen it above the waterline for 10 years, and I knew it was massive. But when you see the other half of it ... gosh."

The 65-year-old warship, now called the Battleship Missouri Memorial, is best known for hosting the formal surrender of Japan in 1945.

Four tugboats guided the Missouri two miles from its historic spot on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor to dry dock on Wednesday. It has been moored for the past 11 years in Pearl Harbor, where a Japanese attack on Dec. 7, 1941, plunged the United States into World War II.

The 54,889-ton vessel now sits on 310 wooden blocks. The hull will be sandblasted and painted, besides preservation work on top. The ship is scheduled to return to Battleship Row on Jan. 7.

BAE Systems Ship Repair has been contracted for the work. Roger Kubischta, the company's president and general manager, said there's a tremendous amount of marine growth stuck to the hull that will need to be removed before it can be sandblasted and painted.

"There's corrosion in spots of the hull, but for the most part, the hull is mostly intact," Kubischta said.

In all, eight square miles of the boat's surface need to be preserved.

Kubischta said a major challenge will be to tent the entire 1,050-foot dock to prevent dust from leaving the area. The enclosure will need to be airtight with ventilation and air blowers.

Three hundred to 400 people will be working on the project almost around the clock. Ninety percent of the work force is from Hawaii, Kubischta said.

The Missouri was last in dry dock in 1992, just after it was decommissioned for the second and last time. It's been moored at Pearl Harbor for the past decade after local supporters beat out groups in Washington state, San Francisco and Long Beach, Calif., for the right to host the memorial.

The USS Missouri Memorial Association now operates the ship. More than 400,000 visitors tour the vessel each year and interest seems to be growing. The ship had a record 49,856 visitors in July.

The "Mighty Mo" was launched in 1944 and fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. It was decommissioned in 1955 but revived in the 1980s, after which it fired some of the first shots of the Gulf War in 1991.

Its home now is just a few hundred yards from the USS Arizona, a battleship that was sunk by the Japanese with more than 1,100 sailors and Marines on board during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Japan surrendered on Sept. 2, 1945, during a ceremony in Tokyo Bay. Gen. Douglas MacArthur signed for the Allied powers, while Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Chester Nimitz, signed for the U.S.

Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and Gen. Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, signed for Japan.

Copies of the surrender documents are on display today on the deck where they were signed.

Weidenbach said the Arizona and Missouri are connected in history.

"The war started and it was a great tragedy with the Arizona, and it ended in peace on the Missouri," he said.

pablo42
10-19-2009, 06:22 PM
Thanks for that Captain. Hated the thought of her being broken up. When I was in Lebanon we were coordinating her firing. Never seen her then, but seen the damage she done. Her shells used to fly over and take the breath out of your lungs. Mighty impressive.

captain kong
10-19-2009, 06:40 PM
I did a gunnery course at Whale Island, HMS Excellent, in 1950 when I was a Sea Cadet.
Those fifteen inch guns can throw a two ton shell over 22 miles.some power.
I did a couple of weeks on HMS Duke of York, in Portsmouth ,she sank the Scharhorst, she had ten 14 inch guns.

Norm NZ
10-19-2009, 11:12 PM
A good friend of mine,Richie Bradshaw,tells me that the HMS Illustious is due to visit Liverpool very soon, well here's a pic of her ancestor ,and in the background you can that other merseyside marvel,the HMS Ark Royal . The picture was in an old War Illustrated so it is a bit poor compared to modern pics.
BrianD

That brings back some memories Brian, The Illustrious 'trooped' us out to the Middle Easy (Cyprus) in 1951, prior to our deployment to the Suez Canal Zone. All the aircraft were taken off her, and the attached photo shows some of the deck cargo, and also how we were accomodated in the Hanger Deck.:PDT11

wsteve55
10-20-2009, 12:56 AM
That brings back some memories Brian, The Illustrious 'trooped' us out to the Middle Easy (Cyprus) in 1951, prior to our deployment to the Suez Canal Zone. All the aircraft were taken off her, and the attached photo shows some of the deck cargo, and also how we were accomodated in the Hanger Deck.:PDT11

hi Norm,
That looks a bit draughty!:cha (41):

pablo42
10-20-2009, 04:02 AM
I did a gunnery course at Whale Island, HMS Excellent, in 1950 when I was a Sea Cadet.
Those fifteen inch guns can throw a two ton shell over 22 miles.some power.
I did a couple of weeks on HMS Duke of York, in Portsmouth ,she sank the Scharhorst, she had ten 14 inch guns.

I never knew you were ex RN. Tell me more about them old ships. I love 'em.

pablo42
10-20-2009, 04:03 AM
That brings back some memories Brian, The Illustrious 'trooped' us out to the Middle Easy (Cyprus) in 1951, prior to our deployment to the Suez Canal Zone. All the aircraft were taken off her, and the attached photo shows some of the deck cargo, and also how we were accomodated in the Hanger Deck.:PDT11

Looks quite comfy Norm. Reckon they were spoiling you.

captain kong
10-20-2009, 10:32 AM
Hi Pablo,
No I am not Ex RN
When I was age 13 I joined the SEA CADETS, there used to be AIR CADETS, ARMY CADETS and so on. I stayed in there until I was 16 then joined the Merchant Navy. but it was good training, kept us off the streets two nights a week and some weekends, and learned discipline. every summer we went on traing courses to various RN ships, and shore establishments. A lot of my mates wouldnt join, but I enjoyed it. To be on battle ships, Carriers , submarines, and learning to fire the old Lee Enfield 303 rifles on the ranges, and in the Dome at HMS Excellent , Whale Island was fantastic, firing the Oerlikons, Pom Poms. at attacking German planes by film on the inside of the Dome, for a lad the Cadets was a fantastic experience. We learned to sail 32 FT CUTTERS AND 27 FT WHALERS, It was financed by the RN in those days, A good supply of Sailors for the RN, but today they have to subsidise themselves.
It made us better sailors when we went to sea, we could splice, rig blocks and tackle, do all the bends and hitches etc.
It would do a lot of kids today a lot of good if they joined a Cadet force.

Here is HMS Vanguard, HMS Prince of Wales, sunk in 1942 on th coast of Malaya by Japanese bombers, her sister HMS Duke of York I did training on and HMS Dido another I did training on in Portsmouth Harbour.
Me under the 14 Inch Guns of HMS DUKE OFYORK, the same guns that sank the Scharnhorst

pablo42
10-20-2009, 10:57 AM
Great pictures Captain. They don't make ships like them anymore. It must have been a great adventure in the Sea Cadets. I was in the Sea Scouts, this was for younger lads, similar to the Scouts. We used to go and visit the Warships when they came into Liverpool. It was a great experience, but we never did the things you done because of our age. Both my lads joined the cadets, one the Royal Marine cadets and one the Army cadets. They really do help to build character. Pity more lads don't go into them. Spose it's not acceptable these days for lads to use guns and learn a bit of discipline. It's a shame.
Any idea if any of them old ships are on show anywhere. The only one I know of is The Belfast in London.

captain kong
10-20-2009, 11:50 AM
All those battle ships were scrapped around 1958, they were built around the 1939 - 1941.
The King George V class, Anson, Howe, Prince of Wales sunk, Duke of York and KGV The Vanguard was completed after the war and lasted a bit longer then scrapped. Dido and all her class were scrapped. we only have the Belfast left from WW2.

pablo42
10-20-2009, 01:36 PM
All those battle ships were scrapped around 1958, they were built around the 1939 - 1941.
The King George V class, Anson, Howe, Prince of Wales sunk, Duke of York and KGV The Vanguard was completed after the war and lasted a bit longer then scrapped. Dido and all her class were scrapped. we only have the Belfast left from WW2.

The biggest Navy in the World and we saved one ship. Pitiful really. Shoulda had one in each of the major ports.

wsteve55
10-20-2009, 06:43 PM
Wasn't the"Vanguard" the last battleship we built? You can see,what I'd think,was the American influence,in it's design! Though not around at the time,of course,I always think of the loss of the "Prince of Wales" and the "Repulse" being a particularly sad waste of life,they didn't stand a chance against those dive-bombers,and with no air cover of their own!

captain kong
10-20-2009, 07:03 PM
Yes she was the last, there was going to be a Lion Class of battleship, bigger than the KGV Class45,000 ton. but only the Vanguard was completed too late for WW2 but I `think`she may have made an appearance in the Korean war shelling the land. She didnt last too long before being scrapped.
I have an idea that Doolittle? proved that battleships had no chance against airiel attack. Obviously this was proved right with the Repulse and the Prince of Wales.
The atatchments are the badges of HMS Repulse and of HMS Prince of Wales, these are kept n Saint Andrews Church in Singapore

brian daley
10-20-2009, 10:37 PM
A Swordfish bi-plane is shown landing on the Illustrious,which was the first of the armoured carriers. Still in the battle mode ,we have a painting of the Japanese battleship Yamato. Theoretically she was the most potent battleship to be built up to that time. An awesome sight,she was sunk by boms in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The Royal Navy Dreadnought ,the ship that maintained Britains mastery of the Seas in the early part of the last century,was shown at her most belligerent in this painting by William Lionel Wyllie.
I think I've got enough paintings and photo's of battle wagons to maintain a thread. Anyone interested,
BrianD

wsteve55
10-20-2009, 11:55 PM
The "Yamoto", and her sister ship,the "Musashi" were some ships,at over 72,000 tons,but sunk just as easily as the "Repulse",etc, under plane attack! And yes Brian,I'd be interested in seeing your paintings,etc!

Norm NZ
10-21-2009, 12:59 AM
hi Norm,
That looks a bit draughty!:cha (41):

Sure Was! Steve, You would'nd believe the antics of all the 'squaddies' when it was time to get into the hammocks, last men in did'nt stand a chance!!!:PDT_Aliboronz_11:

wsteve55
10-21-2009, 01:35 AM
Sure Was! Steve, You would'nd believe the antics of all the 'squaddies' when it was time to get into the hammocks, last men in did'nt stand a chance!!!:PDT_Aliboronz_11:

Ha,Ha, pity you didn't film it! Bet the snoring didn't half echo,as well!:unibrow:

pablo42
10-21-2009, 02:08 AM
A Swordfish bi-plane is shown landing on the Illustrious,which was the first of the armoured carriers. Still in the battle mode ,we have a painting of the Japanese battleship Yamato. Theoretically she was the most potent battleship to be built up to that time. An awesome sight,she was sunk by boms in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. The Royal Navy Dreadnought ,the ship that maintained Britains mastery of the Seas in the early part of the last century,was shown at her most belligerent in this painting by William Lionel Wyllie.
I think I've got enough paintings and photo's of battle wagons to maintain a thread. Anyone interested,
BrianD

Yep, start a new thread then Brian. I love those old warships. I seen a program on the Yamoto. Boy, was that a ship. Seeing pictures of her really gets your pulse racing. Pity she was on the other side. Beautiful ship all the same.

pablo42
10-21-2009, 02:11 AM
Yes she was the last, there was going to be a Lion Class of battleship, bigger than the KGV Class45,000 ton. but only the Vanguard was completed too late for WW2 but I `think`she may have made an appearance in the Korean war shelling the land. She didnt last too long before being scrapped.
I have an idea that Doolittle? proved that battleships had no chance against airiel attack. Obviously this was proved right with the Repulse and the Prince of Wales.
The atatchments are the badges of HMS Repulse and of HMS Prince of Wales, these are kept n Saint Andrews Church in Singapore

True that Captain, Doolittle proved the effectiveness of air power. The powers that be though still doubted this. Hence the Replulse and Prince of Wales. What a tragedy.

pablo42
10-21-2009, 02:13 AM
The "Yamoto", and her sister ship,the "Musashi" were some ships,at over 72,000 tons,but sunk just as easily as the "Repulse",etc, under plane attack! And yes Brian,I'd be interested in seeing your paintings,etc!

Steve, I've not heard of the Musashi. I thought the Yamoto was the only one of her class. Thanks, I shall find out more.

Waterways
10-21-2009, 03:04 AM
Wasn't the"Vanguard" the last battleship we built? You can see,what I'd think,was the American influence,in it's design! Though not around at the time,of course,I always think of the loss of the "Prince of Wales" and the "Repulse" being a particularly sad waste of life,they didn't stand a chance against those dive-bombers,and with no air cover of their own!

They were within range of land based RAF planes. The Capt was told to go to Australia but never.

Waterways
10-21-2009, 03:27 AM
True that Captain, Doolittle proved the effectiveness of air power. The powers that be though still doubted this. Hence the Replulse and Prince of Wales. What a tragedy.

It wasn't Doolittle. The British sunk Italian ships at Tarranto. The Japanese took notice. The British sunk the Bismark using planes to disable her. They may have sunk her but the Home fleet fired on the Med fleet's planes flying to see her off. They said get away the ship is ours. The Japanese took notice.

The British told the captain of the PoW and the Repulse to sail to Australia, as they knew battleships were obsolete. He never. They were sunk. The Japanese learnt fro Tarranto and attacked Pearl Harbour with planes. The attacked Ceylon with planes as well.

The British pre war idea was that carriers would be reconnaissance and to guide the battleships to the target. The US and Japan thought so as well, but a section of their navy and the IJN thought that attack aircraft on carriers was the way and designed planes for that purpose. The UK had to use US planes to make their carriers attack capable.

Waterways
10-21-2009, 03:28 AM
Steve, I've not heard of the Musashi. I thought the Yamoto was the only one of her class. Thanks, I shall find out more.

She was sunk by carrier planes as well.

pablo42
10-21-2009, 10:36 AM
Thanks for the info guys. What a wonderful pair of ships. To see them together must have been awe inspiring.

captain kong
10-21-2009, 06:03 PM
FROM THE

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060
Online Library of Selected Images:
-- JAPANESE NAVY SHIPS --

Yamato (Battleship, 1941-1945)
Yamato, lead ship of a class of two 65,000-ton (over 72,800-tons at full load) battleships, was built at Kure, Japan. She and her sister, Musashi were by far the largest battleships ever built, even exceeding in size and gun caliber (though not in weight of broadside) the U.S. Navy's abortive Montana class. Their nine 460mm (18.1-inch) main battery guns, which fired 1460kg (3200 pound) armor piercing shells, were the largest battleship guns ever to go to sea, and the two ships' scale of armor protection was also unsurpassed.

Commissioned in December 1941, just over a week after the start of the Pacific war, Yamato served as flagship of Combined Fleet commander Isoroku Yamamoto during the critical battles of 1942. During the following year, she spent most of her time at Truk, as part of a mobile naval force defending Japan's Centeral Pacific bases. Torpedoed by USS Skate (SS-305) in December 1943, Yamato was under repair until April 1944, during which time her anti-aircraft battery was considerably increased. She then took part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea in June and the Battle of Leyte Gulf in October. During the latter action, she was attacked several times by U.S. Navy aircraft, and fired her big guns in an engagement with U.S. escort carriers and destroyers off the island of Samar.

Yamato received comparatively light damage during the Leyte Gulf battle, and was sent home in November 1944. Fitted with additional anti-aircraft machine guns, she was based in Japan during the winter of 1944-45. Attacked by U.S. Navy carrier planes in March 1945, during raids on the Japanese home islands, she was again only lightly damaged. The following month, she was assigned to take part in the suicidal "Ten-Go" Operation, a combined air and sea effort to destroy American naval forces supporting the invasion of Okinawa. On 7 April 1945, while still some 200 miles north of Okinawa, Yamato was attacked by a massive force of U.S. carrier planes and sunk.

After the war, the great battleship became an object of intense fascination in Japan, as well as in foreign countries. Yamato's remains were located and examined in 1985 and again examined, more precisely, in 1999. She lies in two main parts in some 1000 feet of water. Her bow portion, severed from the rest of the ship in the vicinity of the second main battery turret, is upright. The midships and stern section is upside down nearby, with a large hole in the lower starboard side close to the after magazines.

captain kong
10-21-2009, 06:20 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljGE2HekBAg
GO ON FULL SCREEN AND SOUND

Some good films of the Musashi and Yamoto in action on UTUBE

pablo42
10-22-2009, 12:59 AM
Great that Captain. What a shame to see her under attack like that. Beautiful ship.

brian daley
10-23-2009, 05:00 PM
Here is a grand old lady,the Anchor Lines Columbia. Built by Hendersons of Glasgow in 1902 she served on the North Atlantic run. She was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser in WW1 and re-named Columbella to avoid confusion with the U.S. Navy's U.S.S. Columbia. In 1919 she reverted to her original name and carried on in the North Atlantic run until sold to Greek owners in 1926. She was renamed Morea and was broken up in Venice in 1929.
This study was was painted by the artist Douglas Napier Anderson,
BrianD

bangorreg
10-24-2009, 08:50 AM
Great that Captain. What a shame to see her under attack like that. Beautiful ship.

Hi Pablo.
Quite agree with you, but thats the way of war, things will never change!
Reg.

captain kong
10-24-2009, 01:53 PM
Here is a good name for a ship.
Imagine being the Lady who is launching and naming the ship.
"I name this ship, `TIGHTEN YOUR ANUS`.

I wonder who thought of that.

pablo42
10-25-2009, 03:36 AM
Here is a good name for a ship.
Imagine being the Lady who is launching and naming the ship.
"I name this ship, `TIGHTEN YOUR ANUS`.

I wonder who thought of that.

Ha,probably sounded great in the naming meeting.

bangorreg
10-25-2009, 06:15 AM
Here is a good name for a ship.
Imagine being the Lady who is launching and naming the ship.
"I name this ship, `TIGHTEN YOUR ANUS`.

I wonder who thought of that.

Hi My Captain
What is the first thing you do after we pee?
Answer- Titan Uranus :handclap:

Reg:)

captain kong
10-26-2009, 01:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain kong
Yesterday I saw a four hour film on Shackleton`s voyage on Endurance, from 1914 to 1917, to the Antarctic, the wreck of the ship and the long journey to get help and rescue, one of the greatest feats of survival. In March I went on a trip to the Antarctic and followed some of the trip that Shackleton did from the Weddel Sea to Elephant Island and on to South Georgia. He died there in Grytviken, 5 January 1922, on his last expedition with a heart attack before he could set off.
The photos are of Endurance being crushed by the ice, Ice bergs in the Weddel sea this year and me at Point Wild, named after one of his men, where there waited 4 months 20 days for rescue, an old photo of Grytviken in the museum there, and the grave of Shackleton in Grytviken, the small cemetery there has around twenty graves of whalers and sailors, one grave is the one man killed, an Argentino Sailor, by the Marines in the Falklands war. Interesting place.
Whenever people visit Shackleton`s grave, they have a little service ending with a tot of Rum and then the final tot is poured onto his grave. I am sure he would appreciate it.

brian daley
11-04-2009, 12:05 AM
A good painting by commercial artist H. Stanley Philpott who worked for several shipping companies.
In this studyhe shows the Federal Steamship liner ,Norfolk of 1947,passing under Sydney Harbour Bridge. Also shown is the Circular Quay to Manley ferry, a real touch of nostalgia for you Ozzie coast men.
BrianD

brian daley
11-14-2009, 02:44 AM
This is a study by a truly gifted artist,Colin Verity of Darwen in Lancs.
It shows the Shaw Savill and Albion lines Mataroa. She was built in 1922 by Harland & Wolff for the Aberdeen White Star Line ,when she was named Diogenes. Shaw Savill took her on longterm charter in 1926 and they subsequently bought her in 1932 when they renamed her Mataroa.She was employed as a troopsgip during the war and served Shaw Savill after the war until 1957 when she was broken up at Faslane. Now for those of you who want to know a bit more about what is what aboard ship, let's take a look at the picture. The sharp bit at the front is called the Bow, the whitework above the bow is the Foc'sle,and the deck above is the foc'sle head. The main structure in the middle of the ship is called the centre castle ,or midships. The six windows you can see in front of the funnel are the bridge windows and the little box on the wing of the bridge is the docking bridge. You can see the crows nest on the foremast,it was open and would have freezing in the North Atlantic,.
BrianD

pablo42
11-14-2009, 03:02 AM
Was that for the ladies Brian? You forgot to tell them about the little boats around the edge of the ship.

bangorreg
11-14-2009, 03:38 AM
Was that for the ladies Brian? You forgot to tell them about the little boats around the edge of the ship.

Pablo.
You are not thinking straight.. She was built in 1922 by Harland & Wolff for the Aberdeen White Star line,"the little boats around the edge of the ship" where put there by the Belfast lads for the "wee folke".:)
Reg.

liverbob
11-14-2009, 04:12 AM
done a three and a half month trip on the old mataroa,sailed out of liverpool on the5-7-56 to aukland and back on the23-10-56,most all scouse crew,agood trip on the old tub.

brian daley
11-15-2009, 01:52 AM
This is the tanker Laristan,built by Short Bros. of Sunderland in 1927 for the Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. of Common Brothers of Newcastle. In 1942 she was stranded off Tiree and was declared a total constuctive loss ,but due to the pressing need for tank shipping she was taken over by the Minisrty of War and repaired and returned to service as the Empire Gulf. She was repurchased by Common Bros.in 1945 and given her old name back. She subsequently changed hands a further three times and was broken up in Turkey in 1960.
This study was by a little known artist E.Archer,
BrianD

pablo42
11-15-2009, 01:15 PM
Nice one.

brian daley
11-20-2009, 12:19 AM
Here are two shots of one of my favourite liners. I never got the chance to sail on her ,I first saw her from the boat deck at Gravesend Sea School. She was being manouevred into Tilbury and the sun was full on her ,she looked beautiful,as exotic those fabled enchanted castles of yore. I saw her again in the British film comedy "The Captains Table" with John Gregson, she was the star. I saw her again in Australia ,many times and the spell was never broken. She was British ship building at its best. She came out of the Vickers Armstrong yard at Barrow in Furnessin 1954. Her vital statistic were ,28.790 gross tons, 723 foot length 90 foot beam,and her speed was 22 knots , She carried 694 first class passengers and 809 tourist class. P&O Orient lines operated her until 1973 and she was sold for scrap in 1974 .
BrianD

captain kong
11-23-2009, 03:42 PM
Here are some of my paintings that I do in my spare time, they may not be as good as the real Marine Artists but they are mine.
cheers.

brian daley
11-23-2009, 06:37 PM
2 VG's there Cap'n.
BrianD

brian daley
11-23-2009, 11:19 PM
This painting is by the artist Charles Dixon ,who was Britains greatest marine artist. It was commisioned by the Empire Marketting Board and was called The River Mersey,the Western Gate of the Empire. It is a pity it does not hang in the Walker Art Gallery or the Maritime Museum,instead it lays somewhere in the National Archives at Kew.
BrianD

brian daley
11-24-2009, 12:21 AM
Here is another study by Charles Dixon. This one is entitled The Pool Of London, Viewed from Cherry Garden Pier. You can see why London was called the Smoke,
BrianD

pablo42
11-24-2009, 12:42 AM
Nice pictures Captain. You're a man of many talents.

pablo42
11-24-2009, 12:43 AM
Nice one Brian, pity the Liverpool picture aint in the Maritime Museum.

bangorreg
11-24-2009, 08:20 AM
Hi Brian,
You never cease to amase and overwhelm me with wonder with your ability.
Great pictures.:)
Reg.

captain kong
11-24-2009, 05:33 PM
Thank you for those kind comments gentlemen.


Two Statues of famous explorers and navigators.
First one is Captain Robert Falcon Scott, famous for not returning from the South Pole, the Statue is in the gardens in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The second one is Mathew Flinders, RN. Navigator He surveyed the Australian coast. The Statue is in the garden of the Cathedral, opposite the Young and Jacksons pub and across from Flinders Street Station on Flinders Street in Melbourne. Named after him.
I took the Photos in 2007

brian daley
11-25-2009, 12:06 AM
Here is another Charles Dixion painting to set the pulse racing. This a study of those two famous tea clippers ,the Cutty Sark and her great rival ,the Thermopylae. They have every sail set in their endeavour to be the first home with that seasons pick of the tea crop. I bought this picture for my Mum forty odd years ago,it was on a china plate which she treasured. Wish I had it now,
BrianD

pablo42
11-25-2009, 01:23 AM
Here is another Charles Dixion painting to set the pulse racing. This a study of those two famous tea clippers ,the Cutty Sark and her great rival ,the Thermopylae. They have every sail set in their endeavour to be the first home with that seasons pick of the tea crop. I bought this picture for my Mum forty odd years ago,it was on a china plate which she treasured. Wish I had it now,
BrianD

Was it that close Brian? Was it like the wine run today.

brian daley
11-25-2009, 06:26 PM
1870-1878: The China Tea Years
Hi Pablo, a lot of myths surround the rivalry between the two great China tea clippers , below is an account the tea "races" ,you will see how the reality differs from the sailors yarns ..................................................

On 16th February 1870, Cutty Sark left London bound for Shanghai, via the Cape of Good Hope, on her first voyage. Commanded by Captain George Moodie, she carried "large amounts of wine, spirits and beer? (Captain?s abstract log). The arrival of the ship at Shanghai, with ?manufactured goods?, is listed in The North China Herald of 2nd June 1870. Departing with around 1,450 tons of tea on 25th June, she arrived back in London on 13th October 1870.

This is the first of 8 voyages the ship successfully made to China in pursuit of tea. However, Cutty Sark never became the fastest ship on the tea trade. Dogged by bad winds and misfortune, she never lived up to the high expectations of her owner during these years. The closest the ship came to winning the tea race was in 1872, when she had the opportunity to race the Thermopylae head-to-head for the first time.

After arriving at Shanghai in late May 1872, she met the Thermopylae when loading her tea cargo. With both sailing from Woosung on 17th June 1872, the two ships closely matched each other through the China Sea and into the Indian Ocean. By 7th August, and with a good tail wind, Cutty Sark found herself a good 400 miles ahead of the Thermopylae. On 15th August, disaster struck when Cutty Sark?s rudder gives way. After reconstructing the rudder twice in heavy seas, the ship arrived back at London on 19th October, around 7 days after her rival. The courage and determination of Captain Moodie and his crew won Cutty Sark great credit, but Moodie retired from his command of the ship due to stress and the ship was never to get this close to winning the tea race again.
I hope this gives you the full picture,
BrianD

brian daley
11-25-2009, 08:16 PM
Here is another Charles Dixon poster. This one was commissioned by the Canadian Pacific Steamship Co. and show one of the famous Duchess Liners.
A truly beautiful picture. Anyone got any ideas of who she was and where she is shown? Answers please,
BrianD

captain kong
11-25-2009, 09:54 PM
She is one of the Duchess ships of four sisters, Duchess of Athol, Bedford, York and Richmond. They were built in the late twenties.
Under my magnifying glass she could be the Duchess of Richmond built 1929 and renamed Empress of Canada in 1947. burned, capsized January 31 1953, then scrapped next year.
The `Bedford` became Empress of France and `Richmond` became the Empress of Canada the other two lost in the war.
Your painting shows the French flag at the mast head showing she could be in a French port on a cruise away from the usual Canadian run to Quebec and Montreal.
The Athol; was built in 1928 and sunk in 1942 in South Atlantic
The York was built in 1928 and sunk off Moroco in 1943

captain kong
11-26-2009, 05:45 PM
Canadian Pacific only had four Duchesses
Company list below.

1922 RMS Empress of Scotland. [26] ? 1905 1906 SS Kaiserin Auguste Victoria (1906-1919, 1919-1921); USS Kaiserin August Victoria (1919) Atlantic, 1906-1914; inactive, 1914-1919; Atlantic, 1920-1930 1930
1922 RMS Empress of Canada. [27] 1920 1922 . Atlantic, 1922-1939; wartime service, 1939-1943 1943

1928 RMS Duchess of Athol. [28] ? 1927 1928 . Atlantic, 1928-1939; war service, 1939-1942 1942
1928 SS Duchess of Bedford. [29] 1928 1928 RMS Empress of France (1947-1960) Atlantic 1960

1929 SS Duchess of Richmond. [30] 1928 1928 RMS Empress of Canada (1947-1953) Atlantic, 1929-1939; war service, 1939-1947; Atlantic, 1947-1953 1953
1929 SS Duchess of York. [31] 1928. 1929. Keel laid down as Duchess of Cornwall Atlantic, 1929-1939; war service, 1939-1943 1943

1930 RMS Empress of Japan. [32] 1929 1930 RMS Empress of Scotland (1942-1958); SS Hanseatic (1958-1966) Pacific, 1930-1942; war service, 1942-1947; Atlantic, 1948-1958 1966

Two views of the Duchess of Richmond below.
There was no Duchess of The Atlantic.

brian daley
11-27-2009, 12:30 AM
And now for something completely different. A poster by Charles Pears which was commissioned by the Empire Marketing Board and is entitled "There's all the Health in the Fish in the Sea. This is in the National Archives at Kew,
BrianD

captain kong
11-27-2009, 12:37 AM
good painting there Brian, That is one of the reasons I didnt go fishing. Always cold and wet, not much bronzy.

What do you think about the Richmond, Was I close.
Cheers
Brian.

brian daley
11-27-2009, 01:49 PM
Hi Brian, I think you were spot on mate, I could just about make out the name after you suggested it. By the way Charles Dixon entitled the picture Duchess of the Atlantic as a term of praise not that he named an actual ship,
Briand

brian daley
11-28-2009, 12:06 AM
Another great Charles Dixon study,this one is of the White Star Liner Britannic.
The original painting hangs in the Ulster Folk and transport Museum.
She is very like the Titanic,
BrianD

captain kong
11-28-2009, 01:00 AM
Hi Brian.
here she is as the Hospital ship obviously just before she was sunk either by mine of torpedo.

Birdy
11-28-2009, 09:27 PM
This is a ship my grandfather sailed on - we found this when researching our family history. Just wondering if anyone would know where its possible to find crew lists for these types of ships? It is the Palmella (Ellerman Lines)

Thanks in anticipation

brian daley
11-29-2009, 10:37 AM
Great picture Birdy,I was on the Palmelian,another Ellerman boat ,in the 60's.Now ,as to crew lists,you could try the National Archives at Kew,they will need dates,the vessels name and money. They charge for their services but are very helpful.You could also try Billy Mcghee on the Mercantile Marine site ,I have found him very helpful in the past. Best of luck in your endeavours,
Briand

Birdy
11-29-2009, 11:18 AM
Hi Brian, thanks for that, much appreciated. We did try Kew originally but it appears that some records for crew lists around the period (early 1900's) were destroyed and so it was a bit difficult. Coupled with that we had great difficulty understanding the referencing system applied to ships records so that didnt help!

Thanks for the info I will look at both those sources.

captain kong
11-29-2009, 01:55 PM
Two Esso Tankers.

Esso Caledonia, 1117 feet in length, 175 feet beam, 68 feet draft increasing to 75 feet with squat. When I was third mate on her we were running from the Gulf ports to Singapore, Kawasaki, Japan, around the Cape to the Mississipi and European ports with 256,000 tons of crude oil.
The other was the Esso Aberdeen, I was Second Mate on this one, Loading 126,000 tons of crude oil from the Brent Spa, 125 miles north of the Shetlands in the North Atlantic. a wild and windy place to be, The highest wind speed recorded there was over 200 knots.
The ship is moored over the bow and loading is over the bow. The engines are kept at 25 revs astern to keep tension on the mooring ropes to prevent the ship riding on to the Spa and the ship rotates 360 degres with the wind and tides. When the wind gets up we had to disconnect and let go then steam around well clear until the wind was at an acceptable speed then start again. it sometimes took up to two weeks to load, on a good day we could load in 24 hours.
The Brent Spa was a `hollow tube` over 450 feet in height and nearly 100 feet in diameter, floating like an up turned milk bottle, moored to sea bed with cables, displacing 66,000 tons.with a rotating platform with contol room, accomodation and heli pad on top. It was filled through an open bottom from pipe lines from the prduction rigs in the Brent Field. Pipelines were eventually laid from the Brent to Sullon Voe in the Shetlands making it redundant.It was discontinued in 1991 and finally scrapped in 1999 after much International campaigning. It was going to be sunk in the Atlantic. but Greenpeace climbed aboard due to the threat of pollution and so eventually it was towed to a Norwegian fjord and scrapped there.

pablo42
11-29-2009, 03:17 PM
Nice one Captain. I think I was on that doing an exercise. Dreadful place.

captain kong
12-03-2009, 06:11 PM
The S.S. JEREMIAH O'BRIEN is one of two remaining fully functional Liberty Ships of the 2,710 built and launched during WWII. The S.S. JEREMIAH O'BRIEN has the distinction of being the last unaltered Liberty Ship and remains historically accurate. Moored at Pier 45, Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco.
She was at Normandy in 1944 at the invasion. In 1994 she sailed from Frisco to London and then did a tour of the Channel ports. I went to London in June 1994 and sat on deck for four days yarning with the old Sailors who brought her over. A good experience after many years to be able to go aboard an old Sam Boat. I had sailed on one of Blue Funnel`s Sam Boats, the Euryades.
I met an old mate on deck and he asked the Admiral, who was Master, now dead, if he could sail back to Frisco with them and he said Yes. I saw him a couple of months later and he told me all about it, A wonderful experience for him. I should have asked but didnt think about it.
I have been on board her a couple of times more when I have been in San Francisco and a couple of the old timers are still working on her It was good to spend Smoko yarning on Number four hatch. It is run by volunteers and maintained by them, A few Vindi Boys get over there for a few weeks to chip and paint etc and live on board. No pay but you get fed and watered.
The photos show the cabin, where four of us would sleep in. We never thought any different about it, but when you see a prison cell today with single occupancy, en suite, computers, mobile phones, TVs etc, makes you wonder what we did wrong.
She still sails every other weekend around the Bay area, if you ever get over there it would be a great experience to do that.
Her steam reciprocatinging engines in use were filmed in the last movie `TITANIC`

pablo42
12-03-2009, 06:22 PM
Nice one Captain.

Harbourm
12-03-2009, 10:33 PM
HI captain, another view of S.S. JEREMIAH O'BRIEN. A fine Ship that I also visited in 2006. She is kept in excellent condition as a tribute to all those who sailed the seas during that time.

HM

Harbourm
12-03-2009, 10:39 PM
Sorry, don't seem to be able to attach the photo.

HM
.

bangorreg
12-03-2009, 10:48 PM
Hi.
A vido clip of the engine room...:rolleyes:
Reg.
http://www.vidoemo.com/yvideo.php?i=YVhldTFGcWuRpTXdmYnc&ss-jeremiah-o-brien-engine-room-october-2008=

captain kong
12-03-2009, 11:45 PM
Good one Reg,
I have been down there three times and always fascinating, reminds me of my couple of trips as a fireman. As I said before, these were used in the film TITANIC.

brian daley
12-06-2009, 08:41 PM
This is a painting of the P&O Hospital Ship Egypt at Alexandria in 1918. This water colour was by Kenneth D. Shoesmith and is dated 1918,
BrianD

pablo42
12-07-2009, 11:48 AM
Nice one Brian.

captain kong
12-07-2009, 03:27 PM
These are not seafaring photos but a lot of seafarers were interested in their music.
I took these photos in a bar, called Hard Rock Cafe, in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.
all autographed by the late great Hank Williams, Buddy Holly, Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens.

Soreofhing
12-07-2009, 06:31 PM
Hi there
Can anyone direct me to a photo or pic of this ship?
Built in 1860 in Liverpool, she was a 287 ton barque used on the Liverpool Argentina run. She belonged to the Thomas B. Royden & Co fleet.
best regards

brian daley
12-07-2009, 08:18 PM
These three pics were taken as slides in 1968,that is why the quality is so poor. But they show a ship I was on,the Demeterton, stuggling around the Cape of Good Hope in a bit of a storm. That last wave shook us like a terrier shakes a rat and the impact forced the Windlass back by two inches. It was one hell of a thud,
BrianD

captain kong
12-08-2009, 12:07 AM
La Zingara T. Royden 1860
A barque of 287 tons built by Royden in Liverpool and registered in Liverpool. Sailed to South America

La Z?ngara
Construction: 1860, Royden in Liverpool
1861 - Registered in the Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping
Owners: T. Royden
Rigging: Barque; sheathed in yellow metal in 1860; fastened with copper bolts
Tonnage: 287 tons
Master: George Sanders
Port of registry: Liverpool
Port of survey: Liverpool
Voyage: sailed for South America


CANNOT FIND A PICTURE

Soreofhing
12-08-2009, 02:55 AM
Thanks captain kong.
I'd love a picture, though.
best regards

bangorreg
12-08-2009, 05:39 AM
These are not seafaring photos but a lot of seafarers were interested in their music.
I took these photos in a bar, called Hard Rock Cafe, in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.
all autographed by the late great Hank Williams, Buddy Holly, Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens.

Captain Kong.
We went to Hawaii mid 1993 and went to see the HRC @ Maui It realy is a great place to visit. Here is a copy of one of their advertisement's.

(Ever play that game where you sit around and try to imagine what albums you'd want on a desert island? Well, wonder no more! We've forged ahead and made the decision easy for you at the Hard Rock Cafe Maui, where rocking out is elevated to an art form. We've got great tunes a-plenty, so pack light, catch a wave and surf on over! The historical backdrop of Old Lahaina town (once the capital of Hawaii) provides an alluring setting, with a lush tropical locale beyond compare and local sights that'll blow your mind, including Haleakala, "the House of the Sun," the world's largest dormant volcano.

From our cafe's quiet garden-style oasis, drink in majestic Pacific vistas, get a close-up glimpse of whales on their migration paths, or just sit back, relax, and enjoy the airy look and feel of our glorious open beam, A-frame ceiling. Marvel at our various island-inspired memorabilia, including an entire wall dedicated to surfer greats Derek Ho, Brock Little, and Kelly Slater. So when the surf's down, or even when it's up, get on over to our most exotic location around- the Hard Rock Cafe Maui!)
Reg.

captain kong
12-08-2009, 10:28 AM
Hi Reg,
thanks for that, it realy is just that, a beautiful island where you can sit with a cool beer and watch the whales blowing spray as they swim past on their way north Hard Rock Cafe is a very interesting bar to be in.
Lahaina is a place I could enjoy living in. Then there is the worlds biggest Banyon tree at the market,
This Banyan Tree was first planted in April, 1873, and marked the 50th Anniversary of Christian missionary work in Lahaina. The tree was imported from India was only 8 feet tall. It now stands over 60 feet high, has 12 major trunks in addition to a huge core. It stretches over a 200-foot area and shades 2/3 of an acre.

bangorreg
12-09-2009, 06:41 AM
Hi Brian.
This clip will bring back some fond memory's for you.There are about 6 clips to see:)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOBNIreXhjw&feature=related

Reg.

captain kong
12-09-2009, 06:38 PM
Thanks for the video clips Reg.
We went to the market under the Tree on a hot day, it was nice and cool under there.
Cheers
Brian.

knowhowe
12-10-2009, 03:25 AM
Not so much ships as boats I guess, but here's some nautical scenes from beautiful Cortes Island, British Columbia, Canada. I was lucky enough to spend a month here in 2006.

http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/mansons.jpg


http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/squirrel.jpg


http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/rowboat.jpg


http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/seaplane.jpg


http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/mansons7.jpg


http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/images/sunset2.jpg

See more of this lovely place here-

http://www.chesterwalls.info/gallery/cortez/cortez.html

bangorreg
12-10-2009, 10:19 AM
HI
Some great photo's, looks a wonderful place.
Thanks Reg.:)

pablo42
12-10-2009, 11:39 AM
Great pictures KH. It's a lovely part of the World. I haven't got any pictures of me travels, so I love seeing photos that I shoulda had.

knowhowe
12-10-2009, 12:38 PM
Cheers lads. It is indeed a lovely place. Only tiny and squeezed in between the Rockies and Vancouver Island, which you can see in the background and which is huge, the size of Britain.
The light there was amazing, very different to here and great for photography.

Jeff Glasser
12-10-2009, 11:24 PM
Gret pic's I'd just love to get my hands on that Beaver!!:unibrow: (with apologies to de Havilland)

dazza
12-10-2009, 11:43 PM
Commuter traffic I wouldn't mind?

dazza
12-10-2009, 11:46 PM
Great pictures knowhowe, thanks for posting. I wouldn't mind going there myself. It looks amazing.

D. :PDT_Aliboronz_24:

knowhowe
12-11-2009, 01:36 AM
Commuter traffic I wouldn't mind?

Indeed. Those float planes were everywhere, taxis of the skies. We got one down from Vancouver to the island and got ferries back, which was cheaper but no less enjoyable. Smallest aircraft I've ever been in (except a microlight), the views were stunning...
They can land on the smallest stretch of water, this shows how they just slot in among the boats when mooring...

http://www.bwpics.co.uk/yoliverpool/floatplane.JPG

If you're looking for a really special holiday, a combination of Vancouver (direct flights from Manchester), the Rockies and the 'Discovery Islands' is definitely it. Beats the crap out of the Med.

pablo42
12-11-2009, 01:48 AM
It's the same all up the Pacifis Coast. I was in Alaska, and they use them to go to the shops. I hitched a lift on a few of them. I thought militarry flying was hairy. Jeez, them guys just don't give a hoot. They were the worst flights I ever had.

'Cept for a crazy Russian in Venezuala. If he's reading this, you scared me to death you b4stard.

knowhowe
12-11-2009, 02:22 AM
Too right. I think scaring the **** of tourists brought a bit of interest to their working day.
The place they landed and took off from in Vancouver was nuts, dodging boats and canoes as a matter of course...

http://www.bwpics.co.uk/yoliverpool/vancouver.JPG

This is Vancouver Harbour's equivant of the Mersey Ferry- these water taxis are the titchiest little public transport craft I've ever seen..

http://www.bwpics.co.uk/yoliverpool/watertaxi.JPG

dazza
12-11-2009, 02:51 AM
Indeed. Those float planes were everywhere, taxis of the skies. We got one down from Vancouver to the island and got ferries back, which was cheaper but no less enjoyable.

If you're looking for a really special holiday, a combination of Vancouver (direct flights from Manchester), the Rockies and the 'Discovery Islands' is definitely it. Beats the crap out of the Med.

Thanks KH, I'll bear that in mind. It looks really amazing. I've done the US rockies, but you can't see the backdrop against the water like that. I've been up in a similar plane [De Havilland DHC-6 Canada Twin Otter] in the Maldives. The pilot was so laid back and chilled, flying without shoes, and commentary all the way. Nice job.

Great pictures BTW.

D.

az_gila
12-11-2009, 05:18 AM
...harbor was way more crowed than anywhere in the Mersey...:)

The water taxis in Victoria, just like the Vancouver ones, where everywhere like you say, float planes of several sizes seem to be taking off or landing every few minutes and lots of smaller pleasure craft around. By comparison, Victoria Airport where I landed (no floats...:)...) was quite calm.

Here is a more traditional shot of the Empress hotel I took in July this year, with one of the water taxis behind the canoes. One of the several seaplane jetties is just off the picture to the left.

http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=11897&stc=1&d=1260504918

More pics near Cortes island to follow...

pablo42
12-11-2009, 10:24 AM
Great pictures guys. Excellent views.

brian daley
12-11-2009, 12:41 PM
I took this one of the France when she was coming back to Dunkirk from her States run in 67. A beautiul looking ship,sad that she had such a short commercial life,
BrianD

pablo42
12-11-2009, 12:47 PM
I took this one of the France when she was coming back to Dunkirk from her States run in 67. A beautiul looking ship,sad that she had such a short commercial life,
BrianD

Didn't she catch fire Brian?

captain kong
12-11-2009, 05:45 PM
`FRANCE` of the French Line,
Launched May 1960, and maiden voyage in January 1962 and used on the Southampton, Le Havre, New York run.
In 1975 she was laid up in Le Havre on the "Quay of the Forgotten," I saw her there when she had just tied up and the crew had a strike and a `sit in`, but to no avail.
In 1979 the Norwegian Line bought her and she was redone as a cruise ship instead of a Liner and renamed `NORWAY`.
In 2003, 8 men were killed in a boiler room explosion in Miami and she never cruised again. She was renamed Blue Lady for the one way journey to Alang in India and run ashore there, despite a great attempt to save the ship and moor her in St Nazier where she was built. In 2008 she was scrapped.
She was the longest liner in the world until the `Queen Mary 2` was built. She was 315 m. and QM2 is 345m.

pablo42
12-11-2009, 11:19 PM
Nice one Captain.

captain kong
12-12-2009, 01:24 PM
I was doing the Canadian Rockies along the Ice Field Parkway around the Athabasca Glacier on my way from Banf to Jasper.

An American tourist said to me `What a fantastic sight`.
I said `Yes but the view is spoiled by those mountains, if they wern`t there we could have a better view.`
The American looked at me and said, `What are you ? some kinda nut?`

I guess he didnt have too much of a sense of humour.

pablo42
12-12-2009, 01:34 PM
I was doing the Canadian Rockies along the Ice Field Parkway around the Athabasca Glascier on my way from Banf to Jasper.

An American tourist said to me `What a fantastic sight`.
I said `Yes but the view is spoiled by those mountains, if they wern`t there we could have a better view.`
The American looked at me and said, `What are you ? some kinda nut?`

I guess he didnt have too much of a sense of humour.

Ha, Yanks just don't understand.

Jeff Glasser
12-12-2009, 01:44 PM
That's typical, who was it said that we are seperated from them by a common language!! They have never quite mastered sarcasm either.

Waterways
12-12-2009, 04:17 PM
I was doing the Canadian Rockies along the Ice Field Parkway around the Athabasca Glacier on my way from Banf to Jasper.

An American tourist said to me `What a fantastic sight`.
I said `Yes but the view is spoiled by those mountains, if they wern`t there we could have a better view.`
The American looked at me and said, `What are you ? some kinda nut?`

I guess he didnt have too much of a sense of humour.

He must have been from the mid-west. Irony passed them by. Irony has a lot to do with salt air.

az_gila
12-12-2009, 08:26 PM
Ha, Yanks just don't understand.

...he didn't call it quaint...:)

az_gila
12-12-2009, 08:29 PM
Ha, Yanks just don't understand.


He must have been from the mid-west. Irony passed them by. Irony has a lot to do with salt air.

...as flat as a pancake (the Mid-West)

Gil A. ...living at 3000 ft only 10 miles from a 10,000 ft mountain....:)

dazza
12-12-2009, 10:06 PM
Irony has a lot to do with salt air.

Would Iron-y be more corrosive in salt-air?

pablo42
12-13-2009, 12:50 AM
Most of the Mid West is dry. No alcohol. That explains a lot.

az_gila
12-13-2009, 04:32 AM
Most of the Mid West is dry. No alcohol. That explains a lot.

...that would just be Utah and some Southern states.

Heck... the beer is brewed in Wisconsin...

Bernie
12-13-2009, 03:18 PM
It is dry where I live, 5 dry counties together. It can be put on the ballot but in the 'Bible Belt' it never gets changed.
It does have its advantages, no rivers of puke and pee in the streets on Saturday nights and a way lower crime rate than in areas which sell booze.
I enjoy a drink now and again so I go to Missouri to buy mine. The state line is only 20 miles from me.:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

pablo42
12-13-2009, 05:02 PM
It is dry where I live, 5 dry counties together. It can be put on the ballot but in the 'Bible Belt' it never gets changed.
It does have its advantages, no rivers of puke and pee in the streets on Saturday nights and a way lower crime rate than in areas which sell booze.
I enjoy a drink now and again so I go to Missouri to buy mine. The state line is only 20 miles from me.:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

Ha, only 20 miles away. Couldn't make it there Bernie. Love me pubs.

brian daley
12-13-2009, 09:15 PM
The passenger liner Kaisar-I-Hind was built in 1914 by Caird& Co. of Greenock for the Bombay service of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co. It was the second succesive vessel of the company to bear that name,which derives from the Sanskrit for Empress of India. During the First World War she survived no fewer than 5 attacks by submarine torpedo,one of which struck her but actually failed to explode and, following abrief charter to Cunard Line in 1921 under the name Emperor of India,she returned to P&O service until 1938 ,when she was sold for breaking up at Blyth.
The painting is another one of Charles Dixons,you can see that masterly touch.



P.S. I loved the pictures from Canada,and the ensuing discussion but can we try and keep this thread for pictures of ships,
thanks,
BrianD

pablo42
12-14-2009, 12:01 PM
Nice one Brian. Sorry for that, it's usually me that goes off thread. Gotta mind that skips and jumps. I shall try my utmost to discipline meself in the future.

captain kong
12-14-2009, 01:43 PM
In 2001 I went to Ascension Island and in a small cove, Comfortless Cove. A small entrance over the volcanic rocks was a small clearance of only a few yards surrounded by black lava flows. In there was a dozen or so graves of Royal Navy sailors. They had died at Ascension from diseases from the West Coast of Africa around 1823 to around 1858. The place was clean and tidy and the grave markers appeared to have had a recent coat of paint.
A sad and lonely place

knowhowe
12-14-2009, 01:51 PM
P.S. I loved the pictures from Canada,and the ensuing discussion but can we try and keep this thread for pictures of ships,
thanks,
BrianD

That's me told. Wasn't sure where else to put 'em however...

Jeff Glasser
12-14-2009, 02:40 PM
Sorry Brian,

pablo42
12-14-2009, 05:22 PM
In 2001 I went to Ascension Island and in a small cove, Comfortless Cove. A small entrance over the volcanic rocks was a small clearance of only a few yards surrounded by black lava flows. In there was a dozen or so graves of Royal Navy sailors. They had died at Ascension from diseases from the West Coast of Africa around 1823 to around 1858. The place was clean and tidy and the grave markers appeared to have had a recent coat of paint.
A sad and lonely place

Nice one Captain. I think I seen these. They were looked after when I seen them.

captain kong
12-17-2009, 12:57 PM
I was in Punta Arenas, Chile in the Magellan Straits in 2006 when I found a Trawler from the UK.
She was the Boston Beverley once registered in Grimsby now same name but registered in Valparaiso, Chile. Fishing 10,000 miles away from home.

pablo42
12-17-2009, 03:30 PM
Nice one Captain.

captain kong
12-20-2009, 02:49 PM
In Grytviken, South Georgia are three ships abandoned on the beach, relics of the old whaling and sealing days.There is the `PETREL` a whale chaser still with the harpoon gun on the focsle, , and the VIOLA and ALBATROSS, two sealers alongside each other.
They had been semi submerged but recently hauled up the beach.
The Viola, which was sold to the Argentinos around the 1920s, was renamed, DIAZ, has a beautiful coal burning, steam engine, all the brass work is in excellent condition considering it is over 100 years old. there is a team of enthusiasts, all volunteers, trying to restore her and get her back to Humberside where she was built as a trawler.

The last photo is of a brass memorial to three British Soldiers who have been killed on South Georgia, it is in the Norwegian Church, One of the Soldiers was a near neighbour, unfortunately his family have moved to another part of town, so I am still trying to find them to give them the photo of thier son`s memorial.

pablo42
12-20-2009, 02:53 PM
Nice one Captain.

brian daley
12-20-2009, 04:50 PM
It was good to see the whaling ships as they are,redundant. If only we could get the Japanese, Norwegians and Icelanders to do the same to their whaling fleet. Thanks for posting them Brian, it brought back good memories of seeing those Leviathans off the Canadian coast,incredible sight,
BrianD

brian daley
12-20-2009, 08:23 PM
Built by J.L.Thompson in Sunderland in 1949 as Silveryew,for the Silver Line of London,the freighter Eastern Glory was purchased on the stocks and so renamed by the Indi-China Steam NavigationCo. of Jardine Mattheson & Co.
The Princely Hong,whose emblem of the St. Andrews saltire she is wearing on both houseflag and stem crest. She was briefly chartered by the Government during the 1956 Suez crisis and 10 years later was sold to Ben Line,renamed Bennachie she sailed on until 1971 when she was scrapped.
The portrait was painted by an unknown Chinese artist and shows her leaving Hong Kong ,painted long before Hong Kong soared skywards,
BrianD

pablo42
12-20-2009, 08:29 PM
Nice one Brian. It looks a long time ago. You can actually see the hills.

az_gila
12-21-2009, 03:05 AM
...derelict now, but still floating and in use as a breakwater at Powell River, British Columbia.

http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=12092&stc=1&d=1261360446

They are unique because they are the only floating concrete freighters left, nine from WWII and one left from WWI.

http://www.concreteships.org/ships/powellriver/

Here's a shot taken from the shoreline of the three closest in the shot above.

http://www.yoliverpool.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=12091&stc=1&d=1261360446

The ships are providing a breakwater at the pulp mill in B.C. and I took these pictures last July.
Powell Lake is in the background of the first picture, and the locals like to say that Powell River, which only flows about two miles from the lake to the Strait of Georgia, is the shortest river in Canada...:)

pablo42
12-21-2009, 04:13 AM
Nice one Az Gila.

brian daley
12-21-2009, 10:17 AM
Fascinating bit of Mercantile Marine history,I have read about concrete ships,seen lots of lighters and barges that were concrete,but never so many hulks.What a useful end for them,thanks for the posting AZ Gila,
BrianD

captain kong
12-21-2009, 04:56 PM
These vessel (C1-S-D1 type) were of the single deck type, with raked stern and modified cruiser stern. there was a big shortage of steel in WW2
The bridge and poop were built of concrete and the deckhousing was constructed of wood.
The ship had seven dry cargo holds, deep tanks and machinery space.
For propulsion there was a 3-cyl. triple expansion reciprocating engine with steam from oil-fired water-tube boilers, all situated aft.
The engine produced 1.300 ihp. Speed was 7 knots. Accommodation was provided for a crew of 39. of 4800grt
good right up about them on google and wilkipedia
A lot were used as breakwaters in Chesapeake Bay and about seven in the Powell River.
I never saw a ship but in the 50s I saw a few barges, they had wooden battens around the hull. I think they were in the Sharpness Canal and docks when I was at the Vindi. There may be one or two of these barges lining the banks of the Severn with all those other steel ones.

az_gila
12-21-2009, 05:37 PM
Captain, the Powell River tourist folks claim that nine of the WWII hulls are there, not seven.

I didn't mention it very explicitly, but while these ships are a breakwater, they are actually still floating. The uniqueness is that these hulks are actually afloat, and have even been repositioned as the Powell River wood mill has been downsized and turned into a pulp mill.

A good history - better than wiki...:)... is here...

http://www.thesunshinecoast.com/about/gianthulks.html


These vessel (C1-S-D1 type) were of the single deck type, with raked stern and modified cruiser stern. there was a big shortage of steel in WW2
The bridge and poop were built of concrete and the deckhousing was constructed of wood.
The ship had seven dry cargo holds, deep tanks and machinery space.
For propulsion there was a 3-cyl. triple expansion reciprocating engine with steam from oil-fired water-tube boilers, all situated aft.
The engine produced 1.300 ihp. Speed was 7 knots. Accommodation was provided for a crew of 39. of 4800grt
good right up about them on google and wilkipedia
A lot were used as breakwaters in Chesapeake Bay and about seven in the Powell River.
I never saw a ship but in the 50s I saw a few barges, they had wooden battens around the hull. I think they were in the Sharpness Canal and docks when I was at the Vindi. There may be one or two of these barges lining the banks of the Severn with all those other steel ones.

captain kong
12-21-2009, 06:19 PM
Hi Az-Gila,
thanks for that info.
I just read it on the Concrete Ships .org
I personally dont know what is what with these vessels. They must have been well built if they are still with us.
This is what the article said..................


The Powell River Floating Breakwater
Of all the concrete ships built during World War I and II, only 10 are known to still be afloat. These ships form a massive floating breakwater on the Malaspina Strait in the city of Powell River in British Columbia, Canada.

The breakwater was constructed to protect the logging pond of the Powell River Company pulp and paper mill (later purchased by Pacifica Papers).

While nine of these ten ships were built during the Second World War, the tenth ship, the S. S. Peralta, is the last remaining WWI concrete ship afloat.

In December of 2000, the mill was downsized as the result of a corporate merger between Pacifica Papers and NorskeCanada. The mill no longer processes raw materials, so they were planning to remove a few ships from the breakwater. The company changed its mine and decided to keep all ten ships, but rearranged them.
YOGN 82
S.S. Henri Le Chatelier
Quartz
S.S. P. M. Anderson
S.S. Peralta
S.S. Emile N. Vidal
S.S. John Smeaton
S.S. Thaddeus Merriman
S.S. L. J. Vicat
S.S. Armand Considere
That site is very interesting reading, amazing what concrete can do.
http://www.thesunshinecoast.com/about/gianthulks.html
I wonder what the effect of a heavy sea has on them, on a steel ship they can hog and sag, bend, what is the effect on a concrete ship I wonder.

Cheers.
kong aka Brian.

captain kong
12-28-2009, 01:16 PM
I know it is not a ship photo but it is a `boat`and the sea and the season of fun.

I did this for my grandchildren.

pablo42
12-28-2009, 01:18 PM
I know it is not a ship photo but it is a `boat`and the sea and the season of fun.

I did this for my grandchildren.

Ha, love it Captain.

brian daley
12-28-2009, 02:08 PM
I took this one in March 1967,we were approaching Bombay as we passed,she was "as stately as a galleon,she glides across the sea." Ageless and perfect of line. Those Arabian boatbuilders created some magnificent craft,
BrianD

captain kong
12-28-2009, 02:43 PM
Here is the Helwick Light Ship, for many years she stood guard by many of the sand banks in the Bristol Channel.
She is now preserved in Cardiff. She is a cafe/ restaurant, and a Chapel.
Last summer I climbed up the Light tower to take the photos of the fore and after decks.
Many of our light ships have been demolished so it is good that some have been put to an alternative use. She is owned by the Christian Society..

The Helwick Lightship


The Helwick LV14 was last stationed off Rhossili, on the Gower Peninsula, in South Wales. The beam from the Light tower could be seen from 25 miles away and warned sailors of the Helwick Swatch, a treacherous sand bank.

Weighing 550 tons with an overall length of 137 feet, the Helwick was built to withstand all the might of the sea. It took eleven people to crew the vessel with seven on board at any one time. In 1975 landing platforms were added so that the crews could be changed by helicopter

pablo42
12-28-2009, 09:12 PM
Nice one Captain.

brian daley
01-02-2010, 09:55 PM
Here's a picture I got sent for Christmas.It is the Tea ship Falcon and is shown passing Portsmouth on a very blustery day.It was painted by S.Frances Smitheman, about whom I know nothing. Nice study though,
BrianD

bangorreg
01-03-2010, 12:58 AM
Here's a picture I got sent for Christmas.It is the Tea ship Falcon and is shown passing Portsmouth on a very blustery day.It was painted by S.Frances Smitheman, about whom I know nothing. Nice study though,
BrianD

Hi BrianD
The following is his Biography...Enjoy
Reg.:)
http://www.smitheman.com/biography.html

brian daley
01-05-2010, 09:25 AM
I saved this one for today,a hospital ship.....................I am having an operation at 2.30 p.m. It just seemed appropriate.
This is the Booth Liner Lanfranc in her hospital ship livery. She was built in 1907 and did service in WW1. No mention of her wartime record ,nor of when she was scrapped.The study was byD.W.E Gutman all of whose known paintings are of Booth Line ships.
Well that's it for now folks, be back soon I hope,
BrianD

M6AJJ
01-05-2010, 09:28 AM
Best of luck Brian, hope all goes well!

Tony

captain kong
01-05-2010, 09:36 AM
Hi Brian,
Didnt know you were going in today
All the best , Hope all goes well.

jimmy
01-05-2010, 09:59 AM
HMHS.Lanfranc - Torpedoed and sank 17th April 1917 by UB 40



Wishing you well Brian:PDT_Aliboronz_11:

pablo42
01-05-2010, 02:07 PM
Good luck with the operation Brian.

And leave them bloody nurses alone...

bangorreg
01-06-2010, 08:01 AM
Hi Brian, Look after yourself, everything will be ok.See you soon.
Reg:)

wsteve55
01-07-2010, 11:01 PM
Hope all's gone well Brian,get well soon!:nod:

brian daley
01-13-2010, 12:27 PM
This is the Berengaria a liner with a chequered history. She was built in Germany as the Europa but was bought by Hapag and renamed Imperator. Hapag had her fitted out to be the most luxurious ship ever for the Atlantic run,they wanted to outdo Cunards Oceanic. She was launched in 1912 and made her first voyage in 1913,it was a dismal failure due to her top heaviness.
All her top deck panels were stripped out and replaced with lighter material and the magnificent bronze figurehead was removed,this,and the addition of several hundred tons of cement ballast reduced her tendency to roll and she re-entered service in 1914. Shed was laid up for the duration of WW1 and was sequestered by the Americans for service as a troopship in 1919.
In 1920 she was chartered by Cunard for the North Atlantic run and was later allocated to Britain as war reparation. She became Cunards flagship in the 20's ,renamed Berengaria and was modernised. Her wiring was so badly corroded that she had constant trouble and was eventually retired in the mid 1930's. She was sent for scrapping in 1938 and this was finally completed in 1946.
She was a looker though!,
BrianD

pablo42
01-13-2010, 12:52 PM
Nice one Brian. Good looking ship.

captain kong
01-13-2010, 03:23 PM
Berengaria, named after Queen Berengaria, wife of King Richard, the only queen of England who never set foot in England, she died and was buried in France.The first of Cunards Liners to be named after a Queen.

captain kong
01-13-2010, 03:38 PM
This is me on the Sailing Ship, Leeuwin of Freemantle, Western Australia a couple of years ago.
I climbed aloft and over the futtock shrouds and onto the yards to furl sail.
Also heaving up the Crojack yard
I was 72 years old then, Not too bad for an old timer. Just had to show I could still do it.

captain kong
01-13-2010, 03:49 PM
CHRISTMAS AT SEA.

Christmas Day 1953, On the New Zealand Star, we were anchored in Algoa Bay in Mozambique waiting for a berth.
We had a Christmas dinner in the mess room with Christmas Cake and then with a few crates of ale all the Sailors and Firemen, Greasers etc sat on the poop and supped the lot.
On deck thats me on the right with open shirt On there is Johnny Freeman, Ronnie Vickers of Birkenhead Charlie Dry of Liverpool , Les Shimmin of Liverpool, Paddy Penson of Newry.

captain kong
01-13-2010, 04:58 PM
Here is me on the wheel on the QE2 on her final world cruise in April 2008.
[not realy, just posing, the iron mike was on, auto steering.] the Quarter master is in the corner by the window.
Also the QE2 entering the Panama Canal for the last time.
On either side are an engine on rail lines. These are called Mules, they pull the ship through the locks when connected by wire ropes.
Many a first trip Deck Boy has been fooled into collecting bread to feed the Mules.

kevin
01-13-2010, 05:03 PM
This is me on the Sailing Ship, Leeuwin of Freemantle, Western Australia a couple of years ago.
I climbed aloft and over the futtock shrouds and onto the yards to furl sail.
Also heaving up the Crojack yard
I was 72 years old then, Not too bad for an old timer. Just had to show I could still do it.

Act your age, Brian. Should be a zimmer frame for you now, none of these high jinks.
;-)

captain kong
01-13-2010, 05:18 PM
Good advice Kevin,
I am slowing down a bit now, till the next time, all this cold weather is bringing out the pains in the old joints.

kevin
01-13-2010, 05:22 PM
Good advice Kevin,
I am slowing down a bit now, till the next time, all this cold weather is bringing out the pains in the old joints.

You keep it up mate - hope I have half of your energy should I make it into my 70s.
:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

captain kong
01-13-2010, 06:09 PM
Cheers Kevin,
A large glass of whisky every day is the trick, Doesnt kill the pain but I just dont care I have it.
Cheers , hic!

pablo42
01-13-2010, 06:13 PM
Nice one Captain. A man half your age couldn't make it up that rigging. You keep it up...

captain kong
01-14-2010, 09:56 AM
I shall ackowledge age
when the call of the far wild seas
no longer stirs my blood,
When my eyes cannot see
what a boy would see
the beauty of a homeward bound ship
harbouring on the flood.
Only then will I sit in the lee of a harbour wall
conjuring up dreams from the rivers mist
of the places I have seen
and of lips left unkissed.

A poem that was posted in `Ships Today and Yesterday` a few years ago.
dont know the poets name, but he must have been a good Seafarer.

pablo42
01-14-2010, 10:32 AM
Nice one Captain.

captain kong
01-14-2010, 04:34 PM
SS GLOUCESTER CASTLE.

This is the SS Gloucester Castle, of the Union Castlre Line.
On 21 June 1942, my birthday, I was up and out early round to my mate Clogger Farnworth`s house, His brother Joe Farnworth was off to join a ship, SS Gloucester Castle, at Liverpool.
Clogger and I helped to carry his sea bag to the bus stop. "Where you going to Joey" I asked.
"To South Africa` he replied, " Wish we could come as well" we said.

Joe sailed that day in convoy to Freetown, Sierra Leone. then on alone towards the Cape.
On the night of 15 July 1942, she was attacked by the `Michele" a German Raider, Captain Ruckstele, [sic]. Shelled and torpedoed, she sank just South of Acension Island, 93 passengers and crew were killed including Joe Farnworth, aged 17. Deck Boy.
The survivors, 41 were picked up by the Germans, some were transferred to another German ship then the rest were taken out east, three taken off in Singapore to work on the Burma Railway , one died, the others taken ashore in Japan and used as slave labour in the coal mines and steel works in Osaka.
they did not get home until January 1946.then the story came out. Mrs Farnworth was then told that her son Joe had died nearly four years before.
Captain, Helmuth von Ruckteschell of the Michele, was tried for war crimes at the end of WW2, and in 1946 was imprisoned at Spandau.

In 2001 I joined the QE2 to sail to Cape Town. I told the Farnworth family including my old mate `Clogger` and took a Merchant Navy wreath with me.
I spoke to Captain Ron Warwick about the incident and he said he would make arrangemets when we got in the position of the sinking.
On the day south of Acenscion Island a table was laid on the upper deck with a red ensign over and with the wreath I had brought.
with many passengers , a lot of them ex Union Castle, Captain Warwick held a Service over the place of the sinking. then after two minutes silence the Wreath was cast into the sea, A few tears were shed by some of the ladies. The dead of the Gloucester Castle had had their first Service. The Family was very pleased it had happened.

Built in Scotland in 1911.
Gloucester Castle was built by the Fairfield Shipbuilding Company in 1911 for the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company. Her tonnage 7999 GRT, a length of 450 feet and 7 inches with a beam of 56 feet 2 inches, her speed, a humble 13 knots.


In September 1914 she was converted to a 410 bed hospital ship In 1915 she was serving in the Galipolli campaign.

Although well identified as a Hospital ship with her large Red crosses painted on her hull, she was torpedoed on the 30th. of March in 1915 on a trip from Le Havre to Southampton, with 399 passengers on board, only 3 died. She did not sink and was taken in tow for repairs In 1919 she was back in service with Union Castle on the South African run.


Gloucester Castle and the Raider, Michele, the Gloucester Castle sinking in the First World War in 1915.

brian daley
01-19-2010, 12:41 AM
This is another colour plate from the Book of Pictorial Knowledge. A Union Castle Liner lies at the quay in Table Bay,South Africa, being loaded with goods for Britain,the artist has captured the scene so well;makes my feet itchy just looking at it,
BrianD

P.S. Can anyone make out the name,I have cataracts and find it a little difficult to read it,
BD

Scoused will
01-19-2010, 12:49 AM
I note from the - at last- updated Yahoo map I see the iris has gone from her berthing on the Thames. Can someone confirm when the evil deed was done

captain kong
01-19-2010, 09:44 AM
Hi Brian,
There is no discernable name showing, I had my magnifying glass on it. It could have been one of the pre war Arundal Castle class scrapped around 1959.she was in Hong Kong when I went to scrap the Good Hope Castle in 1959

M6AJJ
01-19-2010, 10:13 AM
My guess would be the Winchester Castle, the name doesn't seem long enough to be any of the other two funnell UC Ships. eg Warwick. See attached

brian daley
01-22-2010, 02:01 PM
Another illustration from Pictorial Knowledge,all the information is shown in the picture so I'll shut up,
BrianD

captain kong
01-22-2010, 10:34 PM
My guess would be the Winchester Castle, the name doesn't seem long enough to be any of the other two funnell UC Ships. eg Warwick. See attached

You are probably right about it being the Winchester Castle.
They were both four funnel ships, and after the war were re engined and the funnels reduced to two and cut down, the Winchester`s funnels were made shorter than the Aundel`s. See photos.
From the Old Ship Photos Site with thanks.

Winchester Castle. Arundel Castle, Arundel Castle , Winchester Castle.

captain kong
01-23-2010, 03:34 PM
Here are some paintings and are all original oil paintings, on board `Queen Mary 2.` I dont remember the artists names.

`Queen Elizabeth` with the `Britannic` astern leaving New York,` Queen Elizabeth 2`overtaking the` Britannia` of 1840, Cunards first mail ship. `Mauretania` leaving Liverpool with the `Lusitania` along side the Stage. `Franconia`inward bound at New York, I sailed on her as Quartermaster in the summer of 1956 `.Mauretania` and then the` Caronia` known as the Green Godess specialy built for world cruising.
I saw her in 1974 wrecked on the Island of Guam. She was under tow to Taiwan for scrapping when the tugs cast her adrift in the Pacific to go into Guam for repairs, The Caronia an empty ship decided to follow the tugs and arrived alone off the entrance of Apra Harbour and in a heavy swell the fore part of the ship was lifted onto the break water and broke in two across the fore part of the bridge, staying upright and high and dry ashore, the other two thirds of the ship crashed back into the entrance and broke in half again blocking the entrance. The US Navy base there had to blow her up and scrap her under water. Apra was an important Navy base for the Viet Nam War and used for the evacuation in April 1975..

captain kong
01-23-2010, 05:54 PM
This one is the one I still could not afford if I won all the lotteries.
It is Golfer Greg Norman`s yacht. in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
It is `Aussie Rules`got every thing, it costs 80 million pounds. He has his own ship yard and builds these for the Liverpool Market.
When I was at school I was told not to play around, This guy plays a round and makes all that money. Should have been a golfer.

brian daley
01-23-2010, 06:25 PM
Remember those misty summer mornings when you were heading down the Channel, White Cliffs to starboard and and an ocean going yacht to port. You were on your way to where the flying fish played and albatrosses kept you cpmpany. Once through the Mad and down the Red Sea, you would be sail beneath Capricorn and across the balmy oceans.
William Birchalls watercolour evokes such strong memories. I can almost feel the throb of her engines and the crush of her screw.
Doubtles there are some who will opine her name,for me she is just a memory,
BrianD

captain kong
01-24-2010, 02:34 PM
Now this photo is one I found a while ago on a site I have forgotten whose it was or where, but thanks to the owner of it. It brings back memories of boat drill in the Blue Funnel Line, it shows Blueys `ADRASTUS`, probably in the Indian Ocean.
When I was in Blu Flu we always had our realistic boat drill out there. The life boat would be lowered and taken away. The ship would disapear over the horizon and then having taken a Sparky with us we would wind the handle on the jenny and Sparky would transmit the may day.and the ship`s Sparky would do a DF and return to find the boat.
This continued until the early 60s when a squal came down and they couldnt find the lifeboat in the storm.This kind of boat drill was finished then.
Brian D should recognise this.

brian daley
01-24-2010, 06:25 PM
I remember it vividly Brian, the master of the Antenor,.Captain Mcdavid, insisted on giving no warning prior to a life boat drill,no matter what you were doing ,be it up a mast or down a hatch ,when you heard that siren you had to get to your station pronto.
We could get a boat into the water within 2 minutes of hearing the siren. We took great pride in what we did and I am sure it gave the passengers peace of mind when they saw the speed with which we acted. Great days,especially if you were in somewhere calm and the sun was shining,like it is in this pic,thanks for that Brian,
BrianD

pablo42
01-25-2010, 09:08 AM
Nice memories guys.

captain kong
01-28-2010, 04:31 PM
On Tuesday 26 January was the 57th anniversary of the Empress of Canada, a Canadian Pacific liner. burning and then capsizing in Gladstone Dock.
She had one sister left after the war, the Empress of France, I sailed on her a few times.


Wiki: RMS Empress of Canada (1928)

For other ships of the same name, see Empress of Canada.
SS Duchess of Richmond was an ocean liner built in 1928 for Canadian Pacific Steamships by John Brown & Co. at Glasgow, Scotland. In 1947 she was renamed SS Empress of Canada. The ship was distinguished by the Royal Mail Ship (RMS) prefix in front of her name while in commercial service with Canadian Pacific

Empress of Canada
Career
Name: 1928-1947: SS Duchess of Richmond
1947-1953: RMS Empress of Canada
Namesake: Duchess of Richmond
Operator: Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd
Route: Canada to UK
Builder: John Brown & Co., Glasgow
Yard number: 523 [1]
Launched: 18 June 1928
Maiden voyage: 15 March 1929
Refit: 1946/1947
Fate: Caught fire and capsized on 25 January 1953
Scrapped in La Spezia in 1954
General characteristics
Type: Passenger liner
Troopship during Second World War
Tonnage: 20,022
Length: 601 ft (183 m)
Beam: 75 ft 3 in (22.94 m)
Propulsion: Steam turbines Twin propellers[1]
Speed: 18 knots
Capacity: As built 580 cabin, 480 tourist and 510 3rd class passengers


Photos from the Duncan Haws site, with thanks.

captain kong
01-30-2010, 01:25 PM
Here is the `old` `Queen Mary` at Long Beach, California. I have stayed on her several times and is well worth a visit. What are you saving up for at your age???
They have just sent me an email, advertising $89 US, for a night in a First Class Stateroom.There is a shuttle bus that runs from LA Airport for around 5-10 $.
The ship is in wonderful condition, it has been there for many years longer than she was at sea with Cunard.
Plenty of entertainment on board, superb Restaurants, and the Observation Bar is realy good with a band and dancing till the early hours.
I never sailed on her when she was Cunard, I had a chance to never did. In New York in the fifties we used to go on board when we were on the Cunard ships on Pier 92 and she was on Pier 91, Our crew bar, the Pig, closed at 8pm when alongside and the crew bar, pig, on Queen Mary closed at 10pm, so we ran down our gangway through the shed and up the gangway onto B deck and into their bar until 10 pm and then across the road to the Market Diner
Where the crew bar and accomodation was, on B Deck, is now a maritime museum
Crew bar prices then were an old 8 pence for one pint of Wrexham Lager.
Here are a few photos from their email.

pablo42
01-30-2010, 02:10 PM
Nice one Captain.

captain kong
02-01-2010, 06:00 PM
Here is a photo of SS HATASU a typical tramp ship owned by H E Moss & Co of Liverpool, She was built in 1917 and then while sailing independently from Halifax N.S. she was torpedoed by the German submarine U431, 600 miles east of Cape Race in the North Atlantic. with all hands on 2nd of October 1941
On board and killed that day was a young 15 year old deck boy, Billy Dempster who lived at the top of the next street to me in Bolton at No. 15 Settle Street. One of many young lads, 14, 15, 16, years of age whose lives were lost in WW2, when today they still go to school and are considered as children.

U431 was sunk with all hands, 52 men, on 21 October 1943 off the North African coast by a RAF Wellington.

pablo42
02-01-2010, 06:13 PM
Nice one Captain.

captain kong
02-04-2010, 01:21 PM
Now for all you old Hong Kong hands of Blue Funnel here are some photos of........
No.1.
the famous Star Ferry from Kowloon side to Victoria, never changed and still very old, you may have travelled on this one. photo taken in March 2008.
No.2
Floating Restaurant, Asias World City
No.3.
The famous clock tower is still there at the Star Ferry terminal

brian daley
02-04-2010, 02:22 PM
it is just over 50 years since I was in Hong Kong, I'd love to go back but the doc has warned me off long flights. I settle for a visit to Liverpools Chinatown instead,
BrianD

brian daley
02-05-2010, 06:51 PM
I've been very remiss in poting on the Gallery lately and i thought i might catch up with showing some ships from the early says of Britains rise to dominance of the world cargo trade.
1/ The Denbighshire ,built in Sunderland in1899 for Shire Line ,she is a barquentine rigged steamship and the picture was painted by the Chinese collective of artists in Hong Kong.
2/ The Ajax,another barquentine rigged steamer of 1865 ,built for the far eastern trade of Ocean Steam ship Co. of Alfred Holt. This is another painting by the hong kong collective of artists.
3/ Yet another barquentine rigged iron steam screwship of Alfred Holts and sister to the Ajax(yes, I know,why do male named ships get called sisters) a year younger than the Ajax ,these two,together with the Agamemnon led to Holts building a fleet which held domination of the far Eastern traffic for nigh on a hundred years.
4/ The Emily ,a schooner rigged steamship,shown approaching Naples with Vesuvius abeam. Built in1878 by John Readhead of South Shields for robert Harrowing of Whitby,she was sold to Swedish owners and on the 6th of December she was wrecked on passage from Hull yo Norrkoping with a cargo of coal.
The painting is attributed to the Neapolitan artist Antonio de Simone.

az_gila
02-05-2010, 07:48 PM
Brian... you wouldn't happen to have a pic of the "Marchioness of Clydesdale" (circa 1848-1853) would you?

Links back to the genealogy thread...:)

brian daley
02-05-2010, 08:56 PM
I have'nt got that one Al, but you could look in the "old ships pictures site",they have literally thousands of pictures,they are ranged chronologicaly and alpha betically.
Good hunting !
BrianD

az_gila
02-06-2010, 06:29 AM
...childhood memories for me.

It's the Shell tanker Zenatia built at Cammell Lairds. Our Liverpool neighbor worked on it, and he took my family to the launching in 1957.

As a 9 year old, I must have been very impressed at the big ship sliding down with a splash that I can still remember it...:)

The memories came back in the early 90's when I saw a model of it on display at the Maritime Museum in Long Beach, California, with a label that said it had been scrapped in 1976 - made me feel old...:disgust:

captain kong
02-06-2010, 01:43 PM
Here are a few photos of the QUEEN MARY 2, The UKs biggest liner.she went to Liverpool last October.
These photos were taken on her maiden voyage
1 Pool decks. 2 looking aft. 3 QM2. 4 Party time on deck, 5 sunset. 6 In the Wheelhouse, 147 feet wide.7 After deck. 8 Our dinner table.
9 Britannia Restraurant.
10 Pods, there are four two rotate 360 degrees, there is no rudder.
11 Fore deck. 12 Wheelhouse,
13 Restaurant, 14 just had dinner, leaving Restraurant

brian daley
02-08-2010, 03:30 PM
Tremendous set of pictures Brian, I feel very envious of you, I'll have to make do with the Woodside ferry,
BrianD

brian daley
02-08-2010, 03:43 PM
Here is a grand old lady who did 33 years of service on the U.K. to New Zealand service. Built in 1929 ,the M.V. Rangitki was designed to operate via the Panama canal and served from 1929 to the time of scrapping in 1962. She carried 100 first,85 second and 400 third class passengers. She could load 13,000 tons of cargo and had a final service speed of 15.5 knots. The New Zealand Shipping company also had rwo other ships of this class on the same service, the Rangitoto and the Rangitane,
BrianD

captain kong
02-10-2010, 04:02 PM
Here is the BP Tanker` BRITISH CROWN, 18,565 grt.
She had an explosion in the pump room when loading a cargo of crude oil in UMM SAID in Quatar in 1966
killing 18 men , 41 survived.The ship was totally destroyed.The Midship house including the bridge in the first photo was totally destroyed.

Ken Berry
02-14-2010, 12:10 PM
Hi Captain Kong and Brian D,
Haven't been on the Yo for a while but have just been having a look at your Picts and Stories etc.You really do a Great Job and some of the Old Salts really must get a lot of enjoyment from you both. Also they probably give you some information.I'm still chasing info about the Sagamore and my G/dad
looks like Ne Foundland has quite a bit of info but Its looking a bit expensive.Just have to wait and see.I am still looking for a Houlders Bros ship S.S.British Transport she was the ship that rammed the U-49,which sank the Sagamore.Have a photo of her sister ship S.S.British India.Anyway I am interested to see your "British Crown" photos and Story.Not sure if I mention I was a Student come Graduate come apprentice with Babcock & Wilcox at the Renfrew Works 1951-53.They were not impressed when I said "I was going to Sea" Had done my fist 2 1/2 years at Bromborough Power Station building No. 1 and 2 Boilers. Just by the Eastham Locks into the Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal. Had just about finished my time and had to go with another tradesman down to Gourock April maybe 1953.As the
"S.S.British Crown " was on her trials after being built by Cammel Lairds. During her trials one of the Steam Drum Manhole Doors was leaking badly.B & W were pretty concerned as they only had three more days as she had to be handed over by Contract and B & W would be under the penalty clause.The B & W " Big Boss"
had told Alec the Tradesmans name was. Then he told me.I can remember clear as a bell saying to him we have to get a Face Plate to get Marking Blue on for the Drums Manhole Face.Its a long story I had been involved when I had noticed that when the drums were stressed relieved after all the M/C Welding an area of 3 - 4 square foot of the area over one end of rh drum at the entranc of the furnace (Through the inspection Holes in the door) was dullish red compared to the glowing red at the peak temp. It appears that there was a draught area over top of the furnace door.This was just enough to stop a small area not being heated to the required temp.Anyway we got on board and you can imagine it was still pretty warm the Boiler.There was no way Alec was going to be able to get in the Drum.I was fit as a buck rabbit as I was Playing part tnme pro footbal and trained hard.Got the Drum Door off and off its hinge. The machined face of the Door was fine no twist or anything. I got into the drum and we got the face plate on my knees and blue it. Got the Face Plate against ther machined surface of the manhole and jiggled it around the manhole.I could see there was a wee light coming in just above my left shoulder.Got it back on my knees and no sign of blue for about 6 inches either side of 11 0'clock of my left shoulder. So we got the face plate back on the manhole cover again. Alec then got the feeler gauges and made a sketch of what the gaps were.About 20 thou in the middle and 8 inches either side to nothing, but the face had curled slightly.The Big Boss of B & W had arrived withthe Marine Super of BP and the Ministry of Transport Marine surveyor. It was because of the furnace draught that must have caused it and they started to debate.I was in a position now where I could join.So I gave my thoughts that the stess would not have affected the area as the welding was no closer than 4 ft 6 inches,but what had happened when the boilers had been fired up and on the trials to full steam pressure think it was 1400.psi the wee bit of stress had just distorted the M/ced face and it just had to be filed and ground till the face plate gave 100% mark (it was going to be a hell of a job and only the young guys could handle inside the drum as it wasn't going to cool down very quickly. When I got out after Alec used the feelers I told the boss that1 hour in and two hours out and we needed the 4 best 5th year apprentices who played some kind of sport.I also said it would be at the most 30 hours and they would be back on trials. The Marine Surveyor just turned round and said " That sounds good to me just plenty of forced fresh Aiir and lots of nice clean sheets in the drum to stop the metal filings or grindings. I was even asked which apprentices by the boss. Also in the tool room they had what would have been just about the first of the elctric smaller type grinders.Also during every hours grinding we used the face plate to blue mark and make sure we were keeping on track.The Chief engineer offered a spare cadet engineers cabin with 3 bunks in it for a sleep if needed.Plus an ongoing supply of sandwiches and lime water.The Boss asked about the Union Shop Steward being notified and I said "no"
only because he was a pretty good one and he was away fffor two days at a Union Conference in Glasgow.Must admit I think he made a sigh.Anyway we did the Job in 28 hours which really wasn't a bad guess.We stayed aboard and went on the trials,actually we all kipped down for an hour or two but there wasn't a weep of any kind when she was flat stick.We all got a bit of a bonus and the following day off with Pay and the Unionn guyCan't remember his name said you handled it well and you all were happy with what you got.The day before I left B & W Alec Gave me an envelope and told me he didn't want me to open it before I got home to Liverpool the two days later.There was a note in it and !00 Pound all different Scottish Bank Notes.His note Thank me for making sure he didn't have to get in the drum as the heat he said he wouldn't have been able to handle.He also said his bonus was a bit more than the 5 of us young ones and the hundred Pound was just a big Thak You.Managed to keep the Scottish Pounds for quite a few years and the note I had up to 2 years ago when we moved a lot of furniture which we gave to the Sally Army and i think it was in one of the draws.Funnily enough Guys there is an ex Chief of the British Crown has his own web site.Must tell you about My other grand Dad Capt Berry on the Bramley Moore.He was Master on the "Waterloo" Alexander Tug Boat 1911 census.Best Rgards Ken B

pablo42
02-14-2010, 12:19 PM
Nice one Ken.

captain kong
02-14-2010, 01:13 PM
Very intersting story Ken
Cheers.
Brian.

brian daley
02-14-2010, 04:00 PM
Very interesting and detailed story Ken,and well told too. Glad you like our site,hope to hear more from you,
BrianD

brian daley
02-17-2010, 12:06 PM
And now for some pictures of vessels that Ocean going ships depend on when they arrive in port, the tugs! Those gallant little work horses that help us in and out of port.
This is the Security of the Elliot Steam tug Co., which was founded by a Thames pilot in the early 1860's to "engage in seeking and in salvage" which was still active in ship towage in the London River until shortly after World War Two.
The painting was by E. Pelham Jones for whom there are no biographical notes,
BrianD

captain kong
02-17-2010, 03:05 PM
the basic shape is still the same even after 150 years.
an excellent painting, the sea is so real.

Ken Berry
02-18-2010, 09:01 AM
Hi Guys,
The tug shape has never change as you say captain kong.The painting of the Security is a beaut. Think I have mentioned my Grandad Captain Berry on the Alexandeer Towing Co. tug "Bramley Moore" He signed an employment Agreement with the Alex Co in 1926 August.His wages were 6 pound 6 shillings a week plus a commision of 10% of cargo value while he was in command.Prior to 1926 didn't have a clue what e was up to.The 1911 census comes out and he is Master of the Alex tug named "Waterloo".Census night he was on board and filled in the Crew as head of the vessel.I will list them in another email if thats OK and anyone who might find a rellie there I'll send them a copy.It doen't indicate where she is berthed,but all the names of the crew,Position andome is on the census p;us age of course.So that was another search to find her.A chap gave me a lead and said to get into the Swansea Harbour board site.1912 Alex Towing sold her to Swansea and opened up the Alex Tow. Co. in Swansea.They changed her name to the "Mumbles" (funny I can remember scrambling over those rocks as a lad before the war)
Alsogot a photo of her in the "Waterloo" colours and oneof her in her "Mumbles" colours. The the bonus arrived I found a photo of her on support stay and blocks in a ship breakers yard taken in 1956. She really looked as though she could be fired up and steam away. The photo shows it was Briton Ferry Yard and she was built in 1899.And she still looked a Lady.The Old Rangi Boats,did a great service.I was on the new "Rangitane" for a couple of years.2 --6 Cylinder Doxford Engines beautiful engines on Diesel ,then the ccost of boiler oil was much cheaper so the heated it up to 249 degrees and wound the fuel pressure up to over 3,000 psi and they literally became work horses.Maybe should say busesas they stopped on requets for a breakdown.Thanks again I have a gretat time on this site Ken B

brian daley
02-18-2010, 04:40 PM
I took this one myself when I was outward bound through the Med and we passed this homeward bound Ton Smits deep sea tug. She looked so powerful like a seagoing pit bull. Ken, if you have any pictures of tugs,or ships ,we'd love to see them
BrianD

pablo42
02-18-2010, 04:43 PM
Nice one Brian. I love them tugs they have in New York.

Dave Knight
02-18-2010, 06:01 PM
Hi,

Saw the picture of the SS Orient in the gallery. I am currently writing a piece about her. I don't know anything about ships but I am a supporter of Leyton Orient Football Club and our name is linked to the Orient Shipping Line and the SS Orient was their flagship. Anyway, the story goes that one of our football club's committee members was so fond of the SS Orient that he suggested the club adopt that name at an AGM in 1888.

Hence my interest. I am putting together a short article about her for the club's official programme and I wondered if you knew of any interesting stories.

Thanks
Dave

brian daley
02-18-2010, 09:39 PM
Hi Dave,
I never sailed with the Orient Line,and I'm not sure that many others on this site did either. The Orient had Lascar deck crews,so it would be offficers and engineers ,plus some catering crew that would have made up the British element of those crews. If I were you I would try the Mercantile Marine site or Ships Nostalgia,a lot of seafarers are on those sites. Best of luck,
BrianD

P.S. Please feel free to download any pics from my postings,
BD

brian daley
02-19-2010, 06:00 PM
The twin funnelled iron paddle tug Vigilant was built in 1874 by John Readhead &Co. of South Shields for Dr. M. Brownefiekd of Poplar,but in 1894 she was re-acquired by her builders for their own shipyard purposes,albeit registered in the name of a local tug operator George Brown,who in 1923 reconstituted his business as the Brown Tug Co. Ltd.. Vigilant was broken up only in 1930 after a working life of no fewer than 56 years.
The painting was by the artist S. Cummings and shows her entering the Tyne while behind her the nearly completed northern protective pier is shown being built,
BrianD

captain kong
02-19-2010, 10:41 PM
Here is an intersting old Tug, I first saw it in 2006 and then last March I went back and she is still there. She lies almost on the beach at Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego. in the Beagle Channel near to Cape Horn. She was abandonded there in 1957. She served in WW2 and was at Normandy. She still looks in good condition after more than half a century of ice and snow with Antarctic winds blowing at her
It is a pity she could not be brought back to the UK and preserved.
The story below is from Wilkipedia, with thanks.

HMS Justice (W-140), a Royal Navy ship classified as a rescue tug, was built in the United States as U.S. Navy ATR-1-class rescue tug USS ATR-20. Never commissioned into the U.S. Navy, she was transferred to the Royal Navy under Lend-Lease at delivery. Returned to the U.S. after the end of World War II, she was redesignated BATR-20. Struck and sold for commercial service in 1946, she was eventually grounded at Ushuaia, Argentina and abandoned.

[edit] Operational history
ATR-20 was laid down by Camden Shipbuilding & Marine Railway Co., Camden, Maine, 20 January 1943; launched 18 October 1943; sponsored by Miss Joy D. Creyk; transferred to the United Kingdom under lendlease 24 April 1944; and commissioned as HMS Justice at Boston, Massachusetts, the same day, Lt. J. S. Allison, RNR, in command.

During the remainder of World War II, Justice served as a rescue tug in the Royal Navy. She reportedly served at the Normandy invasion in June 1944.[1]

Justice was returned to the U.S. Navy on 20 March 1946 and redesignated BATR-20. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 3 July 1946 and sold 3 October 1947 to Leopoldo Simoncini of Buenos Aires as the Costa Rican-flagged St. Christopher.[1] In 1953 she was chartered for salvage operations in Beagle Channel on the sunken South American Hamburg Company[2] cruise ship SS Monte Cervantes along with several Argentine Navy vessels.[1]

After suffering engine trouble and rudder damage in 1954, she was laid up at Ushuaia, Argentina. She was beached and abandoned there in 1957, and, in 2004, had her remaining fuel oil removed. As of 2007,[3] St. Christopher is still grounded and abandoned at Ushuaia.[1]

Coordinates: 54°48′35″S 68°18′29″W / 54.809694°S 68.308117°W / -54.809694; -68.308117
[edit] References

brian daley
02-20-2010, 01:28 AM
When a tug had you under tow and you reached your time for parting ,the man with the most onerous task was the one who had to "knock off". if the tow rope was taut and under great strain the job could be fraught with danger and here we see one such a man about to do his job.Stand well clear!!!When he swings his maul hammer and that rope is released the tension that is unleashed is quite awesome,
BeianD

wsteve55
02-20-2010, 02:58 AM
When a tug had you under tow and you reached your time for parting ,the man with the most onerous task was the one who had to "knock off". if the tow rope was taut and under great strain the job could be fraught with danger and here we see one such a man about to do his job.Stand well clear!!!When he swings his maul hammer and that rope is released the tension that is unleashed is quite awesome,
BeianD

He looks pretty wary!

ItsaZappathing
02-20-2010, 12:31 PM
When a tug had you under tow and you reached your time for parting ,the man with the most onerous task was the one who had to "knock off". if the tow rope was taut and under great strain the job could be fraught with danger and here we see one such a man about to do his job.Stand well clear!!!When he swings his maul hammer and that rope is released the tension that is unleashed is quite awesome,
BeianD

Well I never knew that. Nice one Brian.

pablo42
02-20-2010, 04:08 PM
Nice one guys. Love 'em.

captain kong
02-20-2010, 05:57 PM
I once had the -privilage of sailing on a Tug, the steam tug Kerne, she is the oldest tug in the UK still sailing. owned by a group of enthuiasts, I was invited by one of the senior members Alan, to help to sail her from Birkenhead to Manchester then up the River weaver. I even threw a pitch on down below. she had a right hand and a left hand shovel. the fires are a little too near the bulkhead . A very interesting genuine steamer..
She was built in 1913 and named `TERRIOR` by the Admiralty to work arounf the Chatham and Medway area. in 1948 she was sold and renamed `Kerne`, then sold again to Liverpool owners. in 1971 she was left in Waterloo Dock to await the scrap yard. A group of Steam Enthusiasts found her and then preserved her and they have been sailing her around the North West ever since, To North Wales, Manchester, Weaver Preston and the Isle of Man.She has appeared in a few movies, and also in a TITANIC film with Barbara Strysand,

Here is a photo of Steam Tug Kerne, from their web site, with thanks , hope you dont mind.

captain kong
02-20-2010, 06:17 PM
The Steam Tug Kerne Preservation Society Ltd web site www.tugkerne.co.uk
On their site are many steam ships to read about complete with photos and sometimes sound effects. Very interesting.

brian daley
02-22-2010, 08:06 PM
This is the North shields wooden paddle trawler Electric SN1394,she was built in 1883 as a tug but,like many of her kind was converted for fishing and was so employed until superceded by purpose built screw trawlers.clearly visible as she enters the Tyne, are the towing bow on her after decks and,amidships,the derrick and the samson post fitted for the handling of trawl nets.
The Electric reverted to towage in 1893 and is recorded as having ventured out 100 mile in the North sea on a rescue mission as late as 1912.
This study was by John Davison Liddell ,a painter of inshore and riverine subjects,mainly on Tyneside,
BrianD

brian daley
03-13-2010, 08:09 PM
And here we have a late arrival,the Massilia. She was built in 1884 by Caird & Co. of Greenock for the Australian and Far Esatern service of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., her name reflecting the ancient Greek for Marseilles. This was an important port of call for the P.& O ships for it was where they made connection with French railway system and could pick up mail which had travelled overnight from the U.K.,conversely she could drop mail for England which would reach England a week before the ship..
The artist,J.W .Fellowes has shown her with the P & O houseflag on her main mast and the signal flags B.N.C.I.,which, in the Commercial Code of Signals then in force, proclaimed her destination as Sydney,
BrianD

brian daley
03-16-2010, 12:30 AM
Here is another work by Charles Dixon,this was commissioned by Holland America Line and shows the Vollendam sailing away from Holland,hope you like it,
BrianD

pablo42
03-16-2010, 12:35 AM
Great pictures Brian.

brian daley
03-16-2010, 09:27 PM
I took these shots back in the late eighties when we were doing a Greek Island cruise. The sail boat was timeless in its design,it could have been at sea any time in the last thousand years; the ferry,so sleek ,looks like a blade cutting through silk. These were the wine dark seas that Homer wrote of,intoxicating in their beauty, BrianD

pablo42
03-16-2010, 09:36 PM
Nice one Brian.

az_gila
03-16-2010, 10:42 PM
Looks like the Greek ferry could do with some paint...:)

brian daley
03-17-2010, 02:00 PM
This was the scene at the docks in Piraeus as we went to join our cruise,it was January and the sun was just rising in the east giving us a moody view of the harbour,wish I was there now,
BrianD

pablo42
03-17-2010, 02:20 PM
Nice photo Brian. I got some of photos of Piraeus Harbour, I'll root them out.

captain kong
03-17-2010, 03:34 PM
What was the cruise Ship Brian?

brian daley
03-17-2010, 05:20 PM
Hi Brian
The Aegean Glory, it was not an overnight job,just a trip for the day. It was lovely ,when we got back to Athens( we were stopping at the Hilton)we spent the night up the Little Acropolis and got a good look at the city. Only had a week there,I was on business,promised ourselves we would go back someday,never have,
BrianD

brian daley
03-18-2010, 08:06 PM
This is another of Charles Dixons paintings and it shows a beautiful old cargo /passenger liner ,the City Of Rome,outward bound from New York. She looks so gracious, almost like a royal yacht,
BrianD

captain kong
03-23-2010, 12:41 PM
Here is a photo of the Gas Loading port of Doha in Qatar, where the worlds largest gas field is. It just arrived in the shareholder magazine of Exxon. last time I was there it was just sand and one pipeline to load oil.
My step son in law is working there, four weeks on four weeks off.
There are a few very large Liquid Gas tankers, a couple of Maerk containor ships and two bulk carriers.

I bet there is not one British Seafarer on any of those ships.

brian daley
03-23-2010, 01:12 PM
Hi Brian
It looks extremely busy,would'nt like to work on them though,you'd never really see the world and they are not like those cargo boat that we started out on,
BrianD

brian daley
03-23-2010, 01:17 PM
Here are some ships that I saw when I was in Malta 16 years ago, the first is a Radisson sailing liner,cost an arm and a leg to cruise on her,she looked beautiful under full sail.
The second ship is the M.V. Doulos,built in 1910 and still sailing in the 21st,the 2007 Guinness book of records ranked her as the oldest working passenger liner in the world.
The ketch in the third picture was built for the Royal Navy in 1942 and now earns a living giving cruises around the island,very relaxing !
And then there is the Gozo ferry, a lovely old boat going to a beautiful island. Would recommend a holiday on Malta to anyone,the place is so rich in history,
BrianD

brian daley
03-23-2010, 04:57 PM
I will now post a series of fishing boats,some people would call the men who sailed in the "real" sailors because of the harsh conditions they endured. The first one up is a Buckie steam drifter Rochome BCK62,built in Middlesborough in 1910 and typical of hundres of such vessels from ports on Britains east coast which engaged in the North Sea herring fishery in the early part of the 20 th century.
This study was by Peter frederick Anson,a marine artist,author and sociologist of the fishing community and co-founder of the Apostleship of the Sea.
BrianD

captain kong
03-24-2010, 12:56 PM
The Steam Trawler `VIOLA` was built in Beverley on the Humber in 1906 for Hellyar and sailed for them until being sold to the Norwegians after WW1. She was renamed `KAPDUEN`and converted to a whale catcher. In 1927 she was sold to Argentina and renamed `DIAZ`and used as a Sealer out of Grytviken in South Georgia.
She lay in Grytviken for many years half sunk. she was recently pumped out and hauled up the beach alongside another sealer, the Albatros.
Efforts to salvage her and return her to the Humber have been going on a while now. I met the team last year when I was there.
The ship model is on show in the Museum in Grytviken.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Almost 100 years to the day that Viola sailed on her first
voyage from Hull, her bell was located on a farm near
Sandefjord. Robb Robinson, who is planning to bring Dias back
to Hull, has been able to buy the bell for Hull Maritime Museum.

brian daley
03-24-2010, 11:53 PM
The wooden steam drifter GIRL EVA YH346 is shown here entering Gorleston Harbour, was built at Oulton Broad in 1913 for Messrs. J. Pitcher Jnr.& Rogers of Yarmouth. In 1915 she was hired by the Admiralty for war purposes and on 2nd. of October the following year was destroyed by a mine off the Elbow Life Buoy. This study was by the Yarmouth artist Kenneth luck who produced many such paintingg of fishing boats of every description.
BrianD

captain kong
03-25-2010, 04:10 PM
For all those who sailed through the Suez Canal in the old days, here are a few photos of it now.
There is a giant bridge half way through, built by the Japanese, going right over the Canal. in the old days there was a swing bridge at El Firdan, that is still there on the photo. one shows the Farouk By Pass, its name has been changed since the revolution in the 50s.
and the WAR MEMORIAL is still there, two columns . I sailed through the Canal for the first time since the 1960s about four years ago on the Portugese ship, `FUNCHAL` on my way home from Freemantle with Joe Finnegan, a Liverpool lad I sailed with on the Empress of Scotland in 1955 and on the Franconia in 1956. The last photo is a suction dredger keeping the Canal deeper and wider.
The third photo is at Ismalia where in the old days we could see British Army ladies swimming on that point and lusty shouting at them. El Firdan Bridge is the fourth photo. Last time I saw that an Onassis `Olympic` Tanker was impaled upon it. The first photo is at the junction or the By Pass for south bound ships, we were north bound at the time.

brian daley
03-25-2010, 07:15 PM
That took us back a bit Brian,do you remember those gigantic American earth movers that "walked". Are they still there?. Good pictures mate
BrianD

kevin
03-25-2010, 07:23 PM
Sailed through Suez many times but being an engineer I was always down below and didn't see that much of it.

brian daley
03-25-2010, 09:31 PM
The iron steam trawlerMorning Star SH61 ,built in Aberdeen in 1900 for the comprehensively named Scaboro, Hartlepool & North Sea Fishing Company of Scarborough.
The painting was by Alexander Harwood a fish porter,,or lumper ,on the fish dock at Aberdeen. He painted portraits of a great many fishing boats and ,as we can see, he was a very competent painter.
BrianD

pablo42
03-26-2010, 09:04 AM
Nice one Brian.

captain kong
03-26-2010, 11:16 AM
Hi Brian,
I looked for those Walking earth movers but didnt see any. It was amazing seeing those giant machines walking and that was 50 years ago.

Oddsocks
03-29-2010, 09:57 PM
Hello everyone,
I've just registered with the site and I must thank you for the photos and comments that you have put up for our entertainment and education. The photos are of a very high quality and the paintings enhance the moment with the imagination of the artist.
Really enjoyed it.

BTW! I sailed with a Brian Daley on the Media in 1958. Wouldn't be you would it Brian?

oddsocks

brian daley
03-30-2010, 12:20 AM
Hi Oddsocks, he could be one of my cousins.I've never met him but I met his dad who my Dads cousin and he kind of adopted me when I was on the Empress of Britain. He was chief engine room storekeeper and he heard that my name was mentioned in a bar in Tenerife. He came over and asked if I was put up to pulling a prank because Brian Daley was the name of his son. I showed him my I.D. and he was stunned ,I had the same three forenames as his lad ( good catholics ) Brian William Gerard Daley. He knew we had to be related and we swapped names of Grandparents and ,yes, I was of the same tribe. He introduced to the chef and the baker who were in the bar too and ,from that moment on I was served up passengers meals and the finest of TabNabs. One night the chef gave me a full tray of Lobster Thermidor which I shared out among the deck crowd. What a memory you triggered there mate,thanks.
BrianD

brian daley
03-30-2010, 12:37 AM
The Banff steam drifter Handy BF 1263,was built in Southtown, Great Yarmouth,in 1903,hauling in her heavy nets.
The painting was by Alexander Harwood,who was a "lumper" or porter on the fish dock in Aberdeen,he served in WW1 on a trawler which was converted for minesweeping./
BrianD

captain kong
03-30-2010, 12:39 AM
I was on the Media in the 50s, I will find my Book and find the date.

I am off to Fleetwood on Wednesday and get some good photos of a trawler, Jacinta, the best record breaking trawler Britain ever had £248,000 in one catch. she is a Museum ship now stopped by the EU while the EU trawlers fish outside of Fleetwood in the Irish Sea.

captain kong
03-30-2010, 12:22 PM
Hi Oddsocks here is a story of the Media I was on her in 556/56, There are many stries like this on the "SHIPS AND THE SEA" thread.
Cheers
Brian

MEDIA, CUNARD LINE


CUNARD`S MEDIA
built by John Brown Clydebank,
Yard No 629
Engines by shipbuilder

Last Name: LAVIA
Previous Names: 1947-61 MEDIA / 61-82 FLAVIA / 82-86 FLAVIAN / 86-89 LAVIA
Port of Registry: Liverpool
Propulsion: 4 team turbines dr geared to 2 sc shafts 15000shp 18 knots / 2 x Water Tube Boilers supplying steam at max pressure 450lbs (430lbs Superheated)
Launched: Thursday, 12 December 1946
Built: 1947
Ship Type: Passenger Vessel
Tonnage: 13345 grt now 15465 grt
Length: 531 feet now 556 feet 0
Breadth: 70 feet 4
Draught: 30 feet 2
Owner History:
1947-61 Cunard Steamship Co Ltd Liverpool
61-68 Cia Genovese Di Arm SPA Italy
68-82 Costa Line Italy
82-86 Flavian Shipping S.A PA
86-89 Lavia Shipping S.A PA
Status: Scrapped - 1989
Gutted by fire at Hong Kong 07/01/1989 while undergoing renovation. Towed to shallow water where she heeled over onto her side on a sandbank. She was righted and towed to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, arriving 17/06/1989 for demolition.




I sailed on Cunard`s `MEDIA` in December 1955 to January 1956. I didnt intend to, the Western Ocean in Winter is atrocious, but a crowd of us had just paid off the GEORGIC after taking her to the breakers and we were having a bevie in `Tom Halls` at the back of the Cunard building and someone came in and shouted `The MEDIA` wants a crowd signing on in the Cunard Building.`
So somehow I was swept along in the rush as someone else said she was a good job. When I sobered up I found I was signed on and due to sail the following day for New York. I also discovered that I had signed on as a Quartermaster, well that would keep me out of the weather on deck.
We sailed bound for New York and it was blowing a gale and sleet. on the way across I have never seen before or since seas as big as that trip. She was climbing verticle upwards and on top of the huge swells it was terrifying looking down the deep valleys then falling 70 or eighty feet and the next mountain of sea waiting to smash her under shaking like a dog out of water as seas cascaded off the fore deck. Very difficult to sleep when you float off the mattress weightless and then fall and the mattress wraps itself around you. By the time we got to New York we were knackered. We had Christmas at sea but we were getting smashed around so much it was a no no. All the big plate class windows on the Prom Deck for the lounges and restaraunts smashed due to the ship twisting like a cork screw, We had no passengers on board that trip and we were one of the few ships at that time to have Stabilizers fitted but we never used them, the Captain said it costs a lot more in fuel with the drag. There was a Pig on board but it didnt get used much, the ale was being spilled all over. I was glad when we got into the Market Diner in New York.
Up on Broadway at night time it was very glitzy, bright as a sunny day with all the lights, Santas, ringing bells everywhere collecting for charity. snow flakes falling, a whole technicolour world. No contest with Liverpool`s dull and gloomy atmosphere, pubs shut at 10pm and surrounded by all the bomb sites around town. New York was a good place to buy the winter gear, thick wool Tartan three quarter length jackets, shirts and hats with ear mufflers on, gloves and scarves, it was freezing and we needed to have this gear.
We had New Years Eve on Broadway and Times Square, fantastic, I have never ever been kissed by as many women in all my life, some pretty ones, Ugly ones, fat ones, thin ones and some of doubtful gendre, ugh, spit. but a great time was had by all until the early hours.
When the Long Shoremen were working cargo , they sometimes called us over, "Hey what size shoes you wear?" I would say tens, `OK here try these` and give us a pair of export shoes, It was so bad over the years that they started to export shoes by shipping all the left shoes on the Media and all the right shoes on the Parthia.
On the 2nd of January we were sailing and the Hudson was frozen over, the temperature had gone down to 28 degrees below freezing, The Captain tried always to get her off the pier, going ahead and astern , the ice was holding her fast. so Ice breakers were called for and they smashed their way through and got us out, jeez, it really was cold, and so we went to Norfolk Virginia to load a cargo of Tobacco, we did`nt go ashore there. A week before some Royal Navy ships had paid a visit there to the US Navy base and as always when the RN and US navy get together there is always a big battle, some men were killed and many injured so feelings ashore were a bit tense so we were advised not to go ashore.
We completed loading in a couple of days and made our way back across a wild Western Ocean to Liverpool. where I paid off and caught up with the leave I should have had off the GEORGIC.

7A
The MEDIA was a cargo passenger ship. she carried 250 first class passengers, six hatches and 20 derricks.
The ship was built for the Cunard as a cargo-passenger liner in 1947.
In 1961 traffic across the Western Ocean was getting a bit thin so she was sold to Codegar Line of Italy and rebuilt as the Europe-Australia emigrant ship Flavia. In 1968 she was chartered to Costa Line, who refitted her as a cruise ship. She operated Caribbean cruises from Miami, and was so successful, Costa bought her in 1969. Her engines became troublesome, so she was sold in 1982. She was sold to Hong Kong based C.Y. Tung Group. Her name was changed to Flavian and was to commence cruising locally. Instead, she was laid up for four years and was sold in 1986 to another Hong Kong shipping company, Virtue Shipping, who changed her name to Lavia. She remained laid up at anchor near Landau Island.
On January 7, 1989, but neglected Lavia caught fire. She was completely gutted and her hulk was sold to
Taiwanese shipbreakers.

Oddsocks
03-30-2010, 01:22 PM
Thanks for that Brian.

The Media was my first ship and with it being a terrible weather ship, I had to find my sea legs pretty quick.
The Media and Parthia trips to New York took 3 weeks: 2 week at sea, 1 week in New York (more often than not in Hoboken). Got know the city pretty well with travelling by bus.
During my period on it there were several incidents that stand out. One was a waiter named John Pascoe who got crushed in the watertight doors. Sadly he died. I remember with clarity watching Frank Dickens the Head Waiter holding him during his final minutes. On another occasion an American sub ' USS Swordfish' (I think) surfaced in front of us in mid Atlantic. Only the sharp reaction by the bridge with a violent swerve to Port saved us from another maritime disaster. Never saw Treasure-Jones move so fast.

A good ship and I have fond memories of it.

az_gila
03-30-2010, 06:24 PM
When the Long Shoremen were working cargo , they sometimes called us over, "Hey what size shoes you wear?" I would say tens, `OK here try these` and give us a pair of export shoes, It was so bad over the years that they started to export shoes by shipping all the left shoes on the Media and all the right shoes on the Parthia.

That sounds just like Liverpool Docks.

When I worked one summer at BAT, the shipping guys talked about a percentage added to all shipments (1 or 2% IIRC) that went through Liverpool Docks for "slippage".

I also had a summer job working for Securicor, and one assignment was watching three dockers unload boxes of canned pineapples. The boss said as long as I could see all three nothing was getting lifted...:)

The jobs were in the 66-67 era...

captain kong
03-30-2010, 07:06 PM
The New York dockers, [ Longshoremen ] were very similar to the Liverpool dockers, in fact there were quite a few Liverpool fellas working on the docks in New York. A lot of cargo did in fact disapear. The whisky was the most cargo that disapear. A case would be dropped heavily, smashing the bottles inside and then it was stood at an angle over a bucket until it drained through the cardboard case filtering the broken glass. then at the end of a shift they were all totally legless, we had to lower a cargo net down the Hold and stow the dockers in then lift them up and land them on the quay. One of the reasons for Containerisation.
Cheers
Brian

brian daley
03-30-2010, 08:48 PM
The wooden steam drifter Arimathea LT 1084; built Lowestoft in 1907. She is displaying both on her funnel and her mainmast the emblem of the Bethel, or Seamens Chapel, which might be worn only on vessels whose Skippers pledged not to fish on the Sabbath.
The painting was by Ernest George Tench, a "pier head " painter who did many portraits who chronicled many of the North Sea vessels in the early part of the 20th century,
BrianD

Ken Berry
03-31-2010, 11:49 AM
Hi Liverbob, You mention ships books.I am searching for a book "Fishermen in War Time, by Walter Wood. Mainly about Minesweepers and Drifters in WW1. About fortnight ago I found out my Paternal Grandad was in the R.N.R. Skipper Alfred Edward Berry and he had been awarded a D.S.C on a Hired Trawler "Frascati" in the Dardenelles. Then sailed on two other Hired Trawlers "Electra" and "Sestrosis" . Was promoted in the R.N.R. to Chief Skipper on an Admiralty Trawler "James Pond". Wondering if you have or know of this book or any photos of the Trawlers Best Regards Keen Berry

captain kong
03-31-2010, 12:18 PM
Hi Ken
I found this on the very interesting site, on Google.
R.N.R TRAWLER SERVICE - Great War Forum

Skipper Bennett ably assisted Chief Skipper Berry of H.M.A. Trawler James Pond in his efforts to save the vessel after she had been heaviy ...
1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=104534 - Cached
Chief Skipper Alfred Edward Berry DSC and Bar‎ - 4 posts - 25 Mar 2010
hmht escallonia‎ - 16 posts - 28 Jul 2008
H.M. Trawler "Voilet May"‎ - 17 posts - 8 Jul 2007
More results from 1914-1918.invisionzone.com »

is this your Grandad???
the Admiralty Trawler James Pond was...................

JAMES POND, Admiralty trawler, lost February 15, 1918, British Isles

Raid by Destroyers on vessels of Folkestone-Grisnez Patrol 14-15.02.18 DSC
Displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty on this occasion.
Skipper Bennett ably assisted Chief Skipper Berry of H.M.A. Trawler James Pond in his efforts to save the vessel after she had been heaviy shelled and set on fire. Attempts were made to put out the fire, and to get the ammunition from below, but both efforts failed, and finally the ship was abandoned, the boat being successfully launched in spite of the fact that the falls had been destroyed by the shelling. The crew got away in her and succeeded in in effecting a landing on the French Coast where they received every attention form the French authorities.

Ken Berry
03-31-2010, 12:34 PM
Hi to All the Guys on the Forum who have helped me in the past.Especially with My maternal Grandad Lunty.Thomas Edward Lunt WW1
Torpedeod on the S.S.Sagamore.Have just found out where he is buried,Anfield Cemetry and not more than 1/2 a mile away from my Paternal Grandad. Master Alfred Edward Berry on rhe Alex.Towing Co.Tug "Waterloo" 1911 census. She went to Swansea as it was staring to become and important Port.Think Alexander Towing wanted some of the action there. So 1912 the "Waterloo" sailed to Swansea and was renamed the "Mumbles" after the rocks around the coast of Swansea. Have found some beaut photos of the "Waterloo" and the "Mumbles". One of the photos of the "Mumbles" she is lying in a Ship Breakers Yard propped up and looks like she is almost ready to fire up and resume her normal job. Believe it or not taken in 1956. I am trying to find out if A.E.B. delivered her to Swansea and stayed on her for a while.Then I remembered before WW2 he used to tell me how he enjoyed the Trawlers and on good weather days in the Irish Sea or the Channel and see the Sunsets and Sun Rises off the Irish and English Coast. For some reason one of the burnt out memory cells started to work and I remembered he had said something about Mine Sweepers. So I started to see what I could find. I got some great help from some of your cousins on another site as well. He was Skipper Alfred Edward Berry R.N.R. in the Dardenelles on a hired Trawler "Frascati" and was awarded a D.S.C for helping the evacuation of the Troops. Then found he was on 2 more hired Trawlers "Electra" and "Sestrosis" about 1916-17 he was promoted to Chief Skipper and boarded The Admiralty Trawler "James Pond". She was escorting 5 drifters trying to net a U-boat that was in the area. Several German Destroyers came out of Zeebruge and Sank the 5 drifters and the "James Pond" he was awarded a D.S.C again for Courage in saving most of his crew and recommended as a very Potential Officer Material. Hoping to find out more from N/A at Kew. He and I were the best of mates and recall from about 4-5 years old he used to give me a kiss. Before going to the "Bramley Moore" Tug. I used to laugh because his Walrus moustache used to tickle me. As I got older, always saw him off to his beloved Tug right up to the end of WW2 when he retired at 76.Still had another 10 years to go. He was happy I went deep sea even as an Engineer same as "Lunty".I have searched for the trawlers but no luck and also the S.S.British Transport" which rammed and sank the U-49 which had torpedoed the Sagamore. If any one can help would be most appreciated. The Thumbnail Pictures are great a lot of work,but am enjoying looking at them all again and again.Best Regards to One and All Ken B

Ken Berry
03-31-2010, 12:48 PM
Captain Kong, Don't know what to say "'A Big Thank You" is very much warranted. I just sent my email and had a look at it and then started to scroll up and have another look at pprevious emails and here's your email with everything, about "Pa" as I called him. Its amazing as he never ever mentioned any other thing except for the Sunrises and Sunsets. Mum and Dad were the same they never said a thing about his experiences. Pa had that South African newspaper cuttung about "Lunty" and how he had managed to keep the other 6 survivors going. And I was to always remember him as a good guy but because of losing his legs just below the knees it changed him.
Thanks again Captain Kong "they say big boys don't cry" there a bit of Mersey Mist around here at the moment God Bless and Best Regards Ken B

captain kong
03-31-2010, 03:56 PM
Thanks for that Ken,
You must be proud to have a Seafaring Hero in the family. A double DSC as well. brave lad. some of us only managed a double DR.
I was in Wellington two years ago and got stuck in the Thistle.
Cheers
Brian.

captain kong
03-31-2010, 04:52 PM
Hi Ken I found an old photo of SAGAMORE. IS THIS THE ONE??

Also a picture of a WW1 Trawler full of troops. is this the Flascati ??

Ken Berry
04-01-2010, 10:25 AM
Hi captain Kong You've done it again yes that my G/dad's "Sagamore" a Whaleback hull. She was all cargo but had 62 cabins 2nd class built on her in 1912. As you can see in the photo.At the same period I'm pretty sure there were 2 other ships named Sagamore one was a Turret hull and the other sailed on the Great Lakes. Plus a huge barge named the Sagamore.It was on an American web site and it was loaded with wheat according to what I read and was towed across the Atlantic WW1.Only to be sunk just before it got to the Bristol Channel, can't swear to that one though.The hired Trawler could well be the "Frascati" as she rescued Troops from the Beaches when they decided to pull our Troops out. Well it be OK for me to take copies of your photos and acknowledge some one. Thank You Once Again Best Regards Ken B

captain kong
04-01-2010, 12:18 PM
Hi Ken, I found the Sagamore on the "Old Ship Picture Galleries" site. the trawler one was on google. I found a site about the WW1 Trawlers but then lost it. it is in there somewhere.
The "Frascati" shows a lot of men on deck and some climbing down into the boat and it appears they are transferring to the Warship whose decks appear to be full of rescued troops. I put it on PICCASA and tried to improve it and did it in Sepia as photos were in those days.
Here is a photo of another Sagamore from that era. from the `Old Ship Picture Galleries` site. Lokks like the one from the Great Lakes.

captain kong
04-02-2010, 02:48 PM
This is the famous Dos Hermanos Bar in Havana Cuba, A little quiet now since the days of the 1950s when the ships of PSNC used to sail there from Liverpool. Brian Daley should recognise it. Many a time I went in there and woke up two weeks later in Valparaiso. Happy days. here are two videos of the Bar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UZZwAZiFmc


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGNmI4buq5A

brian daley
04-08-2010, 03:36 PM
I was there a fortnight before 9/11, had a great time and would recommend it to anyone who likes music ,rum and a good time, some things never change,
BrianD

brian daley
04-08-2010, 09:22 PM
The trawler DANE H227 in the livery of the Imperial Steam Fishing Co. of Hull ,for whom she was built at Beverley in 1911. Subsequently she changed hands no fewer thanseven times, in addition to being requisitioned as a minesweeper in both World Wars , before eventually being broke up in Granton in 1954.
The picture was painted by Joseph Arnold of Hull who was a trawler man before becoming a marine artist,
BrianD

captain kong
04-09-2010, 12:34 AM
Off to Fleetwood this weekend, I will get some interesting Photos and stories of Fleetwood Trawlers and tradgedies.
Back Tuesday

brian daley
04-09-2010, 07:34 PM
I received this in todays post,it is a tin type advert that my sister found in Stuttgart. I have scanned it but it does'nt give you a proper image of the real thing. The ship is embossed as are the ribbons and tug so that the picture is given greater depth. It looks like the Mauretania but there is no name,but I think it looks great anyway.
BrianD

brian daley
04-13-2010, 12:47 AM
Three shipping posters from a long gone age, two of them are for companies that were in competition for dominance of the trans-Atlantic traffic,Cunard and North German Lloyd,World War One would put paid to that competition. The third poster was for another company that played a part in the trans-Atlantic trade but figured greatly in the Pacific traffic,Canadian Pacific. Pre World War Two most of the CP fleet was manned by Canadians but the company re-flagged the fleet under the Red Duster to the detriment of the Canadian personnel.

pablo42
04-13-2010, 09:27 AM
Nice one guys.

captain kong
04-13-2010, 08:16 PM
The Fleetwood steam Trawler `GOTH` FD52, ws on a fishing trip in December 1948 to Greenland and Iceland she was due home before Christmas but went missing.
She was in severe icing and weather and tried to run for shelter from near Greenland to the North West of Iceland but vanished. Nothing more was heard of her and nothing found. 28 men died. Fleetwood was devestated such a large death toll and just before Christmas. Many years later an Icelandic trawler got her nets caught in an obstruction and when she heaved away a funnel appeared. They were going to dump it but the Skipper thought it better to return it to Reyjavik. It turned out to be the funnel of the `GOTH`. The Icelandics returned the Funnel to Fleetwood and at last the relatives of the Dead Fishermen knew where she went down and had at least a memorial.
A couple of years ago this was place outside the Asda Supermarket on the corner of Dock Street and Station Road by the big traffic island. It is not a good place to be as it is almost hidden by bushes and very few pedestrians walk past there and traffic cannot stop there. It would have been much better on the promenade overlooking the sea.
If you click on a photo then click again to enlarge it you can read the story from the memorial.

Oddsocks
04-13-2010, 09:06 PM
Good post Captain. Interesting but sad.
When it was obligatory to eat fish on a Friday and we turned our noses up at it. Little did we know the dangers and hardships men of the sea went through.

gynsman
04-13-2010, 09:15 PM
Don't know how well this will come out but this was my first ship, the now departed MV Lincolnshire, part of Bibby Line. Very fond memories.

pablo42
04-13-2010, 09:26 PM
Nice photo Gynsman.

brian daley
04-14-2010, 12:24 AM
This is a Charles Dixon work, It was a study of the Arcadian and would be used as a poster for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company. The vessel looks like it is approaching port, the sun is setting in the west behind the hills and the smoke is gently curling upwards from her funnel making it look like she is running at a slow speed.An altogether glorious painting,
BrianD

pablo42
04-14-2010, 12:26 AM
Nice one Brian.

captain kong
04-14-2010, 10:04 AM
That is the real price of Fish, The price for the fish on the dockside to the trawler men was peanuts compared to the prices that the mongers charged to the customers.

captain kong
04-14-2010, 04:01 PM
I went to Fleetwood last weekend and went to see the Jacinta and take the Photos. Unfortunately it was closed to visitors so couldnt get onboard. Maybe when the tourist season opens.
I took a few photos from the dockside.
Below is a write up about her, it is from the `Fleetwood Motor Trawler` site.

M.V. Jacinta – FD159
Fleetwood Trawler – Jacinta FD159
Official Number: 341758
Built: 1972 at Wallsend by Clelands Shipbuilders Ltd
Yard Number: 322
Gross Tonnage: 599
Net Tonnage: 178
Length: 142′ 8” ft
Breadth: 32′ 1” ft
Draught: 12′ 10” ft
Owner: J Marr and Sons Ltd

History
1982: Transferred to Hull.

February 1990: Skippered by Dennis Beaumont, Jacinta set a British record catch with £270,516

09/02/1995: Left Hull under tow for Fleetwood to become the focal point of a maritime museum after engine repairs were judged too costly.

Notes
As a trawler working out of Fleetwood, The Jacinta became the most famous stern trawler of her generation. She returned to port with record catches and soon covered her building costs many times over. After years at sea, her engines failed and she seemed doomed for the scrapyard. However, a group of local Fleetwood people rallied to save her and she was bought from her owners for just one pound, and was towed home to Fleetwood. She was then fitted with a new engine to enable her to go to sea and attend heritage festivals

brian daley
04-14-2010, 08:16 PM
This is the last of the fishing boats in my collection. The wooden steam drifter Ocean Harvest YH305 ,built in 1913 for Bloomfields Ltd. of Great Yarmouth,shown hauling her nets. As hundreds of other fishing vessels, she was requisitioned for naval duties during World War 1, but thereafter she remained with Bloomfields until July 13th 1939 , when she was wrecked at Rattray Head, her crew being rescued by the Peterhead lifeboat.
This was painted by them Yarmouth artist Kenneth Luck,
BrianD

pablo42
04-14-2010, 11:22 PM
Nice pictures fellas.

gynsman
04-15-2010, 09:27 AM
Nice photo Gynsman.

Thanks. Took it myself.

pablo42
04-15-2010, 09:40 AM
Thanks. Took it myself.

You should post some more up. You got a good eye for a picture.

Oddsocks
04-15-2010, 10:28 AM
Thanks. Took it myself.

It is a good photo, really professional. How did you take it Gynsman, from a helicopter? You've certainly captured the motion and speed of the ship.

Pity you resized it so small.

Oddsocks
04-15-2010, 10:51 AM
This is a Charles Dixon work, It was a study of the Arcadian and would be used as a poster for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company.

It's a good painting Brian and the artist has kept everything in balance even though the dominant colour is yellow. Charles Dixon is obviously born to it.
I'm talentless when it comes to painting, I would have to stick with blue sky and green sea for it to seem right, even though it's a sunset.

Thanks for all your ship postings, really appreciate them.

Oddsocks

captain kong
04-15-2010, 03:26 PM
From the excellent site, Fleetwood and Wyre on line site

Photo from the site and the excellent Painting from Steve Farrow - Grimsby Based Trawler Artist, the sea is so real..

More of the high price for Fish. the RED FALCON of Fleetwood

HOME. About Us . Newsdesk The MagazineAdvertising Contents Fleetwood NewsFeaturesFleetwood HistoryAnnouncements.History
Trawler Tales

Links
Subscribe Thursday, April 15, 2010
Browse > Home / Fleetwood History, Trawler Tales / Red Falcon Red Falcon

Mid-December 1959.

The week before Christmas and the whole of Fleetwood waited.

A trawler was overdue… and a silence descended on the port.
For days the sea around Skerry – Vore in the South Minch was scoured for the 449-ton Red Falcon and her crew of 19 in a massive sea and air search.

Families waited with mounting anxiety – eyes scanning the horizon in vain and hope. But the Red Falcon was lost – presumed to have been overwhelmed in heavy seas as she made for home.

Wreckage – including a rocket container box, pieces of wood believed to be floorboards on a lifeboat and two lifebuoys stamped “Red Falcon” - was washed up 25 miles north of the vessel’s last known position.

Lost with all hands – leaving 25 children fatherless and a town too stunned to celebrate Christmas.

The Red Falcon – built in 1936 – was the last coal burning trawler in the lago Steam Trawler Co. Ltd. Fleet. She was formerly named Cape Barfleur.

Her last voyage started on November 25th 1959 when she sailed for the Icelandic fishing grounds, leaving on the same tide as the Red Sabre.

The two vessels fished together at Iceland for most of the trip and turned for home at the same time.

Red Falcon was skippered by Alexander Hardy, (45) of Broadway, Fleetwood. A most experienced skipper who undertook minesweeping duties during the war.

He was in contact with Sabre’s skipper (Tom McKernan) and the skipper of the Red Knight (John Mecklenburgh) during the voyage home. Both men later thought the falcon had been engulfed by a tidal wave.

Skipper McKernan had been about 70 miles ahead of the Falcon and Skipper Mecklenburgh about 150 miles behind. Both reported severe gales – with winds gusting to 100mph. Skipper McKernan advised the Falcon to avoid the tidal race off Islay which Skipper Hardy acknowledged.

The area was known to be treacherous with swirling tides.

But relatives had received wires from the ship saying she would be docking Monday night.

As was the custom, many went to meet her in on that Monday – December 14th. It was not unusual for ships to be delayed by bad weather and families again went down to meet Falcon on the Tuesday.

The radio silence from the vessel was ominous and anxiety mounted. “We fear the worst,” said Captain E.D.W. Lawford,

DSO, RN, managing director of the owners.

And as the terrible news began to sink in, the “mission men” continued their task of comforting the bereaved. The Superintendent of the Fleetwood branch of the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, Mr Duncan Brown, and the Port Missioner Mr.G. Wright, visited homes.

All but one of the crew – Fireman Joseph Mair of Portsmouth – lived in Fleetwood.

The crew list was given as:

Skipper Alexander Hardy (45), Broadway, Mate George Gloss (59), Gordon Road, Chief Engineer Jim Carter (39), Macbeth Road, Second engineer William Irvine (45), Bramley Avenue, Bosun Jim Gorst, (38), Wingrove Road, Deckhands Joseph Blackburn (21), Radcliffe Road, Jack McDaid (27) North Street, Jim Read (26), Willow Street, Edward Archer (31), Belmont Road, George Harlin (24), Chatsworth Avenue, Joseph Riches (26), Knowsley Gate, Jim Morley (27), Heathfield Road, William Deery (36), Bold Street, Jack Preston (16), Radcliffe Road, Wireless Operator William Cooper (46), Heathfield Road, Cook George McLoughlin (44) Witton Grove, Assistant Cook John Coultas (20), Abbotts Walk, Fireman John Smith (33), Whinfield Avenue.

Within days an appeal fund for dependants was set up by the Mayor of Fleetwood (Councillor Jim Shaw,JP). Owners, lago, started it with a £1,000 donation and the fund eventually topped £20,000, with cash pouring in from all over the country.

A cheque for £10.10s. Was received from the Church of Scotland on the island of Tiree, Inner Hebrides. An accompanying letter said the loss of the Falcon so near their shores had made a deep impression on the community. It was on the rocky shores of isle of Mull and one from people in Oban.

Seven months after the loss an inquiry opened at Fleetwood Town Hall. It was revealed that the last radio contact with the Falcon was at 7am on December 14th. The Sabre’s skipper called up the Falcon and reported the wind as force 10 between Skerryvore and Rathlin Island. He said he had had a very rough passage but was now under the lee of Rathlin. Falcon’s skipper said he was abeam of Skerryvore Light and he would avoid the tide race.

A few minutes later the Red Knight had also been in radio contact with the Falcon and heard she was in bad weather with a “confused” sea.

The Sabre and Knight continued their homeward journey and no real anxiety was felt until Knight – which had been astern of the Falcon – docked at midnight on Tuesday, December 15th. A 3-day search was launched.

Both skippers thought a tidal wave had swamped the Falcon.

The inquiry believed it was difficult to ascertain the cause of the loss but the most probable cause was that the ship was “overwhelmed”.

And its loss left a town overwhelmed with shock and grief.


Written by The Editor · Filed Under Fleetwood History, Trawler Tales

brian daley
04-15-2010, 09:43 PM
You may have guessed by now that my favourite marine artist is Charles Dixon. Here is another of his paintings of the London river and it is entitled quite simply "The Working Thames". It is signed and dated 1889.It feels like dusk and there is a fog coming on,it's going to be another murky night ,
BrianD

pablo42
04-16-2010, 10:56 AM
Nice one guys.

captain kong
04-16-2010, 11:42 AM
just like the London River in the early 50s.

captain kong
04-16-2010, 08:18 PM
Here is a view of the QE2 in Dry Dock in DUBAI last year after being sold to Nakheel.
She is still there and never moved after 18 months. What a waste.

brian daley
04-16-2010, 09:51 PM
Another Charles Dixon study,this one is entitled "Off Blackwall",a water colour inscribed and dated !911. This is the London river in the upper reaches, it was then the busiest seaport in the Empireand we can see that sail still predominates. The river is alive with traffic,
BrianD

scouse smurf
04-17-2010, 11:18 AM
Here's a few I took the other day

A lighthouse ship that reminded me of the one in Liverpool, thought it was at first.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/4526328899_bf40c9598c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scousesmurf/4526328899/in/set-72157623871318912/)

The MV Cill Airne which is used as a restaurant

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4047/4526965284_fe3c036c08.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scousesmurf/4526965284/in/set-72157623871318912/)


A replica of the Jeanie Johnston Barque. Not a great photo, but I'm even crapper when the sun is around

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4017/4526339787_eddd876f50.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scousesmurf/4526339787/in/set-72157623871318912/)

The Samskip Pioneer arriving in Dublin

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4030/4527030586_29fff6f2cc.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scousesmurf/4527030586/in/set-72157623871318912/)

The Elbtrader

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4011/4526400537_31e8bb7bd7.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scousesmurf/4526400537/in/set-72157623871318912/)

Sorry if I've bored ya. There's a couple more in my dublin flickr if ya wanna see them :)

pablo42
04-17-2010, 11:30 AM
Great pictures guys. Shame about the QE2 Captain. What's likely to happen to her? I remember the Thames being busy around that part of the river Brian. Not with sailing ships though.

Keep putting you photos up SS. I've never been to Dublin.

scouse smurf
04-17-2010, 11:46 AM
Neither had I, only had 3 or so hours of sight-seeing in the evening, and didn't have a map, so missed lots of things. Check out the link in my signature for the couple of hundred I took :)

pablo42
04-17-2010, 12:07 PM
Neither had I, only had 3 or so hours of sight-seeing in the evening, and didn't have a map, so missed lots of things. Check out the link in my signature for the couple of hundred I took :)

Nice one SS.

gynsman
04-17-2010, 02:36 PM
You should post some more up. You got a good eye for a picture.

Sorry but I lied. I found it on the net, but I was being truthful about it being my first ship.

pablo42
04-17-2010, 02:38 PM
Sorry but I lied. I found it on the net, but I was being truthful about it being my first ship.

Na, nice one GM.

Oddsocks
04-17-2010, 03:48 PM
A replica of the Jeanie Johnston Barque. Not a great photo, but I'm even crapper when the sun is around
Sorry if I've bored ya

Nothing wrong with the photo. Scouse. You've caught the moment in an afternoon setting (please don't say morning:rolleyes:) and they certainly aren't boring.

Nice one.

Oddsocks

Oddsocks
04-17-2010, 03:52 PM
Sorry but I lied.

Haven't we all at some time. Politicians do it all the time.

But it is a good pic. Might claim it myself now that it's an orphan;-)

Oddsocks

pablo42
04-17-2010, 03:53 PM
Haven't we all at some time. Politicians do it all the time.

But it is a good pic. Might claim it myself now that it's an orphan;-)

Oddsocks

Hey!! I took it...

Oddsocks
04-17-2010, 04:08 PM
OK Pablo, let's share it.
I'll have Fo'c'sle head and Amidships you can have the Ares end:)

pablo42
04-17-2010, 04:18 PM
OK Pablo, let's share it.
I'll have Fo'c'sle head and Amidships you can have the Ares end:)

If I knew what it was, I'd agree with you...

Oddsocks
04-17-2010, 04:30 PM
SS United States on front cover, taken by a LRMS member in Philadelphia.

Usual good read by Editor Pat Moran

brian daley
04-17-2010, 05:37 PM
Hi Oddsocks,
I am on the mailing list for the Red Duster and I agree with you that it is a good little magazine. I used to subscribe to Sea Breezes up until the mid 70's and it seemed to change and so I stopped taking it. For less than £10 a year it represents great value,
BrianD

captain kong
04-17-2010, 06:20 PM
HI SS I put the Barque Jeanie thingy on Picaso 3 and lightened it

scouse smurf
04-17-2010, 08:28 PM
Nothing wrong with the photo. Scouse. You've caught the moment in an afternoon setting (please don't say morning:rolleyes:) and they certainly aren't boring.

Took it in the evening, probably after 7


HI SS I put the Barque Jeanie thingy on Picaso 3 and lightened it

Thanks

I'd already used window live's photo thingy to remove shadows, lightened it a bit and added back some blue. It's the best I could do :)

Ken Berry
04-26-2010, 01:48 PM
Hi Captain Kong.
Salutaions,Thank You I got the picture of the "Frascati" Evacuating Anzac's off the Beach during the evacuation.,Took a while Googling. Very Interesting saw some marvellous photos of various ships. Quite unusual at the Anzac Dawn Parade yesterday. I was
at attention and just as we started to March to our RSA, I could feel Pa Berry's presence and how we had been such good mates and I knew what he had been doing 95 years ago. Almost at the same time Marching for him,my wifes Dad Bomber crash WW2 in Scotland and his brother a Spitfire pilot who came through it all and joined the RAF and was killed a couple of years after the War.A Big thank You and All the guys Best Regards Ken berry

captain kong
04-26-2010, 05:39 PM
Hi Ken, Glad the photo was OK for you. I believe a helicopter crashed killing three men on their way to the ANZAC parade. very sad.
Cheers
Brian.

kevin
04-26-2010, 05:45 PM
Hi Ken, Glad the photo was OK for you. I believe a helicopter crashed killing three men on their way to the ANZAC parade. very sad.
Cheers
Brian.

Hey Brian,
I know when I'll be in Bolton but don't have my diary to hand - but it's a Monday night in June and I'm staying at the Holiday Inn.
Care to find us a nearby hostelry with good ale?

Apologies to others for going off thread.

captain kong
04-26-2010, 06:17 PM
Hi Kev,
welcome to Bolton. I know the Holiday Inn on Higher Bridge Street, It used to be another name then two guests were killed by a member of the staff, so it was given a new name.
Now I am going in Hospital for an operation on Wednesday 26 May, so depending on the outcome and ability to walk I will be there, let you know later. I have been waiting eight months for the op.
The government say, should only have to wait 18 weeks, I will be 32 weeks in the waiting.

Let you know after the op
Cheers
All the best
Brian.

kevin
04-26-2010, 07:30 PM
Hi Brian,
Hope the op goes well. I think I'm up about the third week in June so hopefully you'll have recovered.I'll email you the date when I find my diary - think it's in work.
Thanks for telling me about the hotel!
Kevin


Hi Kev,
welcome to Bolton. I know the Holiday Inn on Higher Bridge Street, It used to be another name then two guests were killed by a member of the staff, so it was given a new name.
Now I am going in Hospital for an operation on Wednesday 26 May, so depending on the outcome and ability to walk I will be there, let you know later. I have been waiting eight months for the op.
The government say, should only have to wait 18 weeks, I will be 32 weeks in the waiting.

Let you know after the op
Cheers
All the best
Brian.

captain kong
04-27-2010, 01:28 AM
Hi Kev 3rd week in June is my birthday 21, Should be OK by then.
Cheers
Brian.

Samsette
04-27-2010, 02:08 AM
Twenty-one, eh! Dad's gonna let you have the car keys now.:)

Hope everything goes fine with the op, Cap'n, and that you'll soon be up on the dance floor tout sweet.

captain kong
04-27-2010, 09:31 AM
Thanks for that Malc.
"I`m three quarters way home from the start to the end and I wish I was 18 again."
( George Burns)

kevin
04-27-2010, 11:33 AM
Just checked - it's the 21st I am there. Still up for a few sherbets or will your good lady be taking you out?
Kevin


Hi Kev 3rd week in June is my birthday 21, Should be OK by then.
Cheers
Brian.

captain kong
04-27-2010, 01:18 PM
I will check it out Kevin, and let you know , but should be OK.
Cheers
Brian

captain kong
04-27-2010, 02:32 PM
from the
http://www.ssgreatbritain.org/home.aspx


The ss Great Britain was a world first when she was launched in Bristol in 1843. This uniquely successful ship design brought together new technologies in a way which transformed world travel.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the most daring of the great Victorian engineers, conceived the groundbreaking combination of a screw propeller, an iron hull, and a massive 1000-horsepower steam engine.

She was immediately successful - on her maiden voyage across the Atlantic the ss Great Britain easily broke the previous speed record.

Although effectively a prototype, she continued sailing until 1886, and travelled thirty-two times around the world and nearly one million miles at sea.

She was finally abandoned in the Falkland Islands, in 1937, after more than 40 years use as a floating warehouse.

In 1970 an ambitious salvage effort brought her home to Bristol, where today she is conserved in the dry dock where she was originally built.


This me under the propellors in Bristol Dry Dock

az_gila
04-27-2010, 05:41 PM
Thanks... a neat picture of early propellor design.

brian daley
04-30-2010, 12:15 PM
The Royal Mail liner Alcantara,shown here off the coast of Brazil, was one of a series of liners built for the South American trade. She was designed to carry passengers as well as refrigerated and general cargo. I knew of her from a very early age,my great uncle Joe was a quartermaster on her in the thirties and his photo ,in full fore and aft rig, was stuck on my Nins sideboard in her living room. The ships name was shown clearly on his hat band,
BrianD

Oddsocks
04-30-2010, 08:39 PM
from the
http://www.ssgreatbritain.org/home.aspx. . . conceived the groundbreaking combination of a screw propeller, an iron hull, and a massive 1000-horsepower steam engine.

Good piece Brian.

Walking through Anfield Cemetery one day I come across this modest gravestone with the interesting inscription. Because the stone is dirty through age, the inscription on the plinth is a little difficult to decipher: So to save your peepers I've taken the labour out of you struggling to read it, by transcribing it.

Oddsocks

William Becket-Hill Born 1841 - Died 1908

He helped to change paddle tugs to screw,
To initiate high pressure and twin screws for Ocean going steamers,
To introduce steam line conferences with the rebate system,
And to start the Shipping Federation, the London Shipping Exchange,
And the British Empire League.

Ken Berry
05-01-2010, 01:47 PM
Hi All You Guys who helped me with My G/D Alfred Edward Berry.I received all the Papers, Documents,Parts of Naval Books, etc from the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton, Truly they were fascinating and clear as a bell to read. But I made a real "faux pas" which you know what I mean in Navy terms. A Cardinal sin of not checking date of Birth,So it wasn't my G/Dad after all.Same name but younger by 14 years,I'm sorry for giving you the wrong info but I hope it will do some good.I have been in Touch with the Hull Trawlers site and the guy is going to try to find thr relations of Chief then Chief Skipper Alfred Edward Berry For Me and I will send them all the Documents. I still know he was minesweeping somewhere so the guy at the museum is going to have a good go for me..The Anzc Parade I still felt close A.E.B. and Rita's Dad and Brother.You were right abou the Helicopter crash.King Kong. 3 Iriquois's were on their way down from the Air Base at Ohakea to the Wellington Cenotaph for the Dawn Parade.The weather was grotty and very gusty they come down the coast and ther inquiry will find out what exactly happened.Some mist separated them and one must have lost any land fall and had lost a bit of height and smashed into a gulley on a farm. 3 were killed and one seriously injured,but is stable and expected to recover. My apologies once again and Thank You .Hopefully maybe some one will find them as a suprise.Best Regards Ken B

Oddsocks
05-01-2010, 05:35 PM
That's a bit of sad news that Ken. Expectation high as the clouds but euphoria short lived. Oh well mate let's hope you get the information soon.

Best o' luck,

Oddsocks

brian daley
05-03-2010, 12:36 AM
The P&O Liner Viceroy of India ,built for the Bombay service. She set new standards of luxury and speed. This gracious liner was sunk by a German U-Boat in 1942. Just sit and enjoy the picture,
BrianD

captain kong
05-03-2010, 08:35 PM
The film Mutiny on the Bounty was on TV the other day, the one with Marlon Brando and Trevor Howard.
I took these photos from the TV.
In the photo with the Wahines in the sea fishing in the background there is a peak in front of the big mountain, we climbed up there, along a foot path. It is in Moorea in `Bounty` Bay.
The ship they used for the film was built larger than the original to accommodate all the filming equipment. She was in Seattle in August 1990, I went on board for $5 but they would not let be leap aloft.
The later Biounty filmed with Mel Gibson was built in New Zealand and is nearly always in Sydney, I went on board that one and it is the original size and very small inside. I have a photo of her entering Moorea somewhere, My old Tahitian mate, Stanley , his father, was in the film as one of the Tahitians.

az_gila
05-03-2010, 09:46 PM
The bfilm Mutiny on the Bounty was on TV the other day, the one with Marlon Brando and Trevor Howard.
I took these photos from the TV.
In the photo with the Wahines in the sea fishing in the background there is a peak in front of the big mountain, we climbed up there, along a foot path. It is in Moorea in `Bounty` Bay.
The ship they used for the film was built larger than the original to accommodate all the filming equipment. She was in Seattle in August 1990, I went on board for $5 but they would not let be leap aloft.
The later Biounty filmed with Mel Gibson was built in New Zealand and is nearly always in Sydney, I went on board that one and it is the original size and very small inside. I have a photo of her entering Moorea somewhere, My old Tahitian mate, Stanley , his father, was in the film as one of the Tahitians.

The Marlon Brando era replica is still around... and many more of us saw it as Captain Jack Sparrow's ship in Pirates of the Caribbean – Dead Man's Chest....:)

http://www.tallshipbounty.org/

pablo42
05-03-2010, 09:52 PM
Nice one guys.

az_gila
05-03-2010, 10:08 PM
My son sailed on this one during the filming of Russel Crowes film Master and Commander: Far Side of the World.....

It's HMS Rose - but HMS Surprise in the movie....

http://www.tallshiprose.org/photos/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=329&g2_serialNumber=2

He, and the other sailors were somewhat p***d off that the movie extras go paid more than they did, when they were doing all of the actual work. It was filmed off the Baja, Mexico and he got a few weeks paid vacation down there. The extras did most of their shots in a large tank built for the Titanic movie, and the actual sailing crew did the shots out in the open ocean.
A picture he had of his girl friend was funny - dressed in baggy pants, her long blond hair tucked under a scarf, and a mustache painted on - but that's Hollywood when the cameras don't do a close-up...:)
He says he knows where they are in the movie from some of the helicopter shots, since they were both high in the rigging at the time.

This is a picture of the "tank" ship - apparently the rest of the sails were added digitally after filming - as always, nothing real in Hollywood...

http://www.tallshiprose.org/photos/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=270&g2_serialNumber=2

pablo42
05-03-2010, 10:11 PM
Nice one AG. We had the same thing in war zones...

captain kong
05-03-2010, 10:36 PM
This is the last BOUNTY about to enter `Bounty` Bay in Moorea, built in New Zealand for the Mel Gibson film, She is quite often berthed in Darling Harbour in Sydney. Sometimes she does short trips out to the Heads and back with a lunch or dinner thrown in for about $50.
She is an exact replica of the original

captain kong
05-04-2010, 12:49 AM
I went on board the Rose in San Diego, California, in 2005 she was on the next berth to the Star of India, another British ship preserved by the US.
very interesting day out there. Got the photos some where, Going to Fleetwood for a few days, will find them then.

George
05-04-2010, 11:10 PM
Was there a ship called the "Bromley" :slywink:

brian daley
05-05-2010, 12:49 PM
Hi George,
I had a look around for a ship called the Bromley and this coasting tanker was the only one I could come up with, I hope it is the one,
BrianD

pablo42
05-05-2010, 12:52 PM
Nice one Brian.

George
05-05-2010, 01:20 PM
Thanks for that Brian any info on it? or a link to its demise? :PDT11

brian daley
05-09-2010, 01:06 PM
Ahoy there,
Two important programmes of interest to all those of you who like ships and Liverpool. BBC4 at 9.00p.m. tonight, Sunday 9th of May, has "The Box that changed Britain", a programme about how containerisation changed life on the docks. This is followed by "A Passport to Liverpool",a historical look at its Maritime history and multicultural populace. Set your recorders or watch it live!!
BrianD

wsteve55
05-10-2010, 01:31 AM
Ahoy there,
Two important programmes of interest to all those of you who like ships and Liverpool. BBC4 at 9.00p.m. tonight, Sunday 9th of May, has "The Box that changed Britain", a programme about how containerisation changed life on the docks. This is followed by "A Passport to Liverpool",a historical look at its Maritime history and multicultural populace. Set your recorders or watch it live!!
BrianD

Ermm! a bit hard to read in that type Brian!? Good post though!

captain kong
05-10-2010, 11:54 AM
I had to go out for dinner but I saw the last two progs. about Liverpool and then the Cod War off Iceland.

brian daley
05-10-2010, 02:35 PM
A tropical night in the interwar years. the sea is almost like a mill pond and there is just enough of a breeze to keep the old square rigger under way. In the background we can see the lovely old German liner ,the Cap Arcona heading north through that calm south Alantic sea, if you could listen you would hear the strains of a palm court orchestra wafting across the ocean. Oh for the age of gracious living,
BrianD

pablo42
05-10-2010, 02:42 PM
Nice one Brian.

brian daley
05-14-2010, 11:55 PM
Two Ladies of a certain age, both admired and beautifully turned out but radically different in presentation.
First we have the celebrated,and very much alive , Queen Mary, she looks robust and as solid as the Rock of Gibraltar. Then we have the Normandie, very French and very chic,but ,sadly ,no longer with us. Both are very easy on the eye, they recall a golden age of shipping,
BrianD

wsteve55
05-15-2010, 03:08 AM
Didn't the "Normandie" hold some speed records,etc,till her demise?

brian daley
05-15-2010, 07:36 AM
Hi Steve, Yes, the Normandie did hold the Blue Riband for making the fastest crossing of the Atlantic.
She was also the largest shp to be fitted turbo-electric engines ,a record that has not yet been surpassed.
Her greatest rival in the Trans Atlantic race was the Queen Mary. The war brought about her demise, the U.S. government commandeered her and she was going to be used as a troopship.While she was undergoing her refit she suffered a major fire( it was suspected to be sabotage) and was beyond repairing. She was sent to the scrapyard in 1946,a very sad end for such beautiful ship,
BrianD

brian daley
05-16-2010, 12:43 AM
Cap'n Kong e.mailed this link. He cannot get on Yo !(has he been barred?) Anyway,all you ship enthusiasts might be interested to see this site,the ships graveyard at Alang,
www.midshipcentury.com/videoalang1.shtml

wsteve55
05-16-2010, 01:42 AM
Excellent link there Brian, some fascinating stuff!

Norm NZ
05-16-2010, 01:43 AM
Hi Brian. I see the Aussie's are remembering the disaster that befell the Hospital Ship Centaur, which was topedoe'd by the Japanese 57 years ago this month. and I believe the wreckage was only discovered a short while ago! This was a really monsterous attack on a unarmed vessel, and also carrying doctors, nurses, and patients. may they rest in peace!

brian daley
05-16-2010, 02:00 AM
Hi Norm,
have you a link to this item,it could be added to our Warships and Propaganda thread. I have not read about this yet,
BrianD

captain kong
05-16-2010, 09:38 PM
it is on there, warships.
Cheers.

Norm NZ
05-17-2010, 12:57 AM
Hi Norm,
have you a link to this item,it could be added to our Warships and Propaganda thread. I have not read about this yet,
BrianD

Sorry Bri, don't have a link, just saw it on the tv news here the other day! perhaps the Capn has pointed you to a link!

brian daley
05-17-2010, 01:21 AM
Hi Norm,
Look on Warships and Ships of war,Cap'n Kong has done a posting there,it is quite informative,
Cheers,
BrianD

Norm NZ
05-17-2010, 01:31 AM
Thanks Bri, will do that, Cheers. Just read the Cap'ns post, don't know how I missed it! what a atrocity this was! and the Japanese embassy says the sinking was inconclusive!!!! B*****tds.

brian daley
05-20-2010, 12:29 AM
I did'nt put this in picture of the day for obvious reasons,it was taken in 1881. Francis Frith was the photographer and it shows Georges Dock. I will await comment from those of you who are well versed in our city's architectural history as to what the buildings in the background are,
BrianD

pablo42
05-20-2010, 12:34 AM
Nice one Brian.

Samsette
05-20-2010, 06:11 AM
Brian. That is a very interesting photo, in my opinion, as those sailing vessels appear to be sealing and/or fishing schooners. The boat on the deck of the nearest one is just a wee bit too big for the usual lifeboat found on such a vessel. They were usually hung between fixed davits at the stern. There is likely no way that we shall ever find out their purpose, but maybe Cap'n Kong will come to the rescue. Heres hoping.

brian daley
05-20-2010, 09:50 PM
A little bit of nostalgia here, dated 1955,this picture requires no further description from save for a little anecdote related by an AB called Joe Murphy. Joe said he was on his way to Birkenhead to join a Bluey,he had a battered suitcase and a tan which marked him out as a sailor. One of the ferryboat men started talking to Joe and Joe just listened to his tale. The guy said that he was sick of going to sea and was going to pack it in. Joe said he nearly had a bowel movement stifling his laughter,
BrianD

Ron Ham
05-21-2010, 02:43 PM
Hi Samsette, I will throw in pilot cutter or revenue cutter as they look too smart for fishing vessels & I dont think we had sealers in Liverpool ,for those vessels in Georges Dock . Ron

captain kong
05-21-2010, 03:45 PM
Dont know what they are, The ship is nicely painted and so is the boat in the davits. maybe it is just a new painted jolly boat. It must be a oermenant feature on deck because of th davits.
Cheers.

Samsette
05-21-2010, 07:00 PM
Pilot schooner is a possibility, Ron. I never thought of that, although they were in use, in that role, in the nineteenth century. I never heard of Liverpool being a port for sealers either, Cap'n, but there appears to be three or more schooners in the picture, and sealers did operate in fleets, hence my idea.

I was also of the opinion that Georges Dock might have appeared to be somewhat smaller than the dock featured. At first glance I thought it to be Salthouse. Oh well, it certainly is a picture to ponder over.

captain kong
05-21-2010, 11:25 PM
Hilbre Island off the Wirral is full of seals, maybe they caught the seals off there?? just a guess.

Samsette
05-22-2010, 04:37 AM
They are everywhere, on every shoreline; stinking up the place. Paul MacCartney oughta build a home there.

brian daley
05-23-2010, 11:14 PM
A major part of a deckhands work was the task of beating back rust,we had clean the rust off steelwork with chipping hammers ,steel scrapers and wire brushes. The hull of the ship was under constant attack from rust and ,when we were alongside , were had to get stuck in ,using punts and stages to get close up to the job. Because we were in port we would nearly always be suffering from the drink we had consumed the night before. During the first hour or so,we would be gripping hold tight on to the rope falls,after smoko we would be like high wire artistes,look closely at the pictures and they will give some idea of what I am writing about ,
BrianD

brian daley
05-31-2010, 03:12 AM
Two pictures from a time when Liverpool was a premier port,the first picture gives us an aerial view of the Brunswick dock and upwards to theThree Graces ,with the Customs House near the top rght hand side of the shot. Secondly, we have a picture of the Landing Stage and Pier head ,buzzing with activity as a liner comes alongside. The pictures were taken in 1934 and the scene was practically unchanged until the 1960's,
BrianD

pablo42
05-31-2010, 11:23 AM
The changes in the pictures are amazing. Nice one Brian.

az_gila
05-31-2010, 06:55 PM
A major part of a deckhands work was the task of beating back rust,we had clean the rust off steelwork with chipping hammers ,steel scrapers and wire brushes. The hull of the ship was under constant attack from rust and ,when we were alongside , were had to get stuck in ,using punts and stages to get close up to the job. Because we were in port we would nearly always be suffering from the drink we had consumed the night before. During the first hour or so,we would be gripping hold tight on to the rope falls,after smoko we would be like high wire artistes,look closely at the pictures and they will give some idea of what I am writing about ,
BrianD

A close look at the Queen Mary in Long Beach shows that this is the step that Disney omitted.

Even at the deck levels you could see that they just painted over the rust. Luckily I don't think it can sink since there is only a foot or two under the keel IIRC.

This was a few years ago, but I'm sure it hasn't got any better recently - such a shame.

brian daley
06-01-2010, 10:20 PM
Please forgive the quality of these pictures,I had a hell of a job lifting them from a 74 year old magazine called Shipping Wonders of the World.
The first picture is of the Orient liner Orion ,built in 1935 for the Australian Mail and passenger service, a classic looking ship.
Next we have a Harrison liner ,the Inanda. She was built in 1925 for service to Natal,hence the Zulu name. She was transferred to the West Indian run and was registered in Liverpool.
Thirdly we have a(then) modern motor Tramp ship,the Sutherland. Built in 1935 and registered in Newcastle,this type of vessel was built by the mile and cut off by the yard,very popular with Tramp ship companies.
Next is a good looking Shaw Savill and Albion liner,the Waiwera,shje was built in 1934 for the New Zealnd meat trade ,perhaps some old salts out there could fill us in about their fate during WW2.
Finally, we have a great Canadian Pacific liner, the Empress of Japan. Built in 1930 for the Vancouver and the Far East run. She looks every inch an Empress !!
BrianD

brian daley
06-04-2010, 12:52 AM
When Liverpool was the second greatest city in the Empire and the port was the second greatest in the world, there was a great demand for seamen to man the vessels. There were no national sea schools back then in the 19th century and some unscrupulous boarding house masters helped to fill this void. One of the most famous ,or, should I say,notorious ,was a man called Paddy West. There are so many tales atttached to this man and his wife about his "sea school" and the the money he made from getting crews for the ships that no sane or experienced sailor would touch ith a barge pole. One sea shanty tells of an innocent at large,
"Oh, as I wuz a-rollin' down Great Howard Street,
I strolled into Paddy West's house;
He gave me a plate of Am,erican hash , an' swore that it wuz English scouse;
Sez he,"Look 'ere young feller,ye're very jist in time,
To go away in a big clipper ship,an' very soon ye'll sign.
Paddy boasted that he could turn any landlubber into a fully fledged Able Seaman in just a matter of days.
His house was usually full of bums and stiffs taking advantage of the low fees for lodging. When he thought that they had worn out their welcome he would start their "tuition" so that he could get them signed on an outward bounder. first he would get the candidate used to deep sea fare,dressing him in clean dungarees,
with a nice rope yarn for a belt.
Practise in stowing sails came next,Paddy would send them up to the attic to furl the "main royal", or rather the window blind. More seamanship was acquired in the backyard,where Paddy had a ship's wheel rigged up. The apprentice had to stand by the wheel, and before he had spun it around twice,Paddy's wife, Maggie Ann,would have thrown a bucket of water over him- his baptism by a cold nor' wester. Next the rube was called into the "passage" ,where he would have to step over a piece of string , before entering the parlour,or front room. Here on the table stood a cows horn, around which he was ordered to march.
Paddy explained that this ritual was so that when the mate of the outward bounder asked our new made sailor to what parts of the world he had sailed ,the candidate could honestly answer that he had "crossed the line and been round the Horn ten times" Paddy would warn them not to say it was a cow's horn.
Then the potential sailor was handed the papers of some real sailor who had been knifed or bludgeoned in a drunken brawl.
Paddy would then give the new A.B. a sea chest full of second hand gear, and **** near useless it was too,he put in carpet slippers but no sea boots,"Must'nt damage dem nice wooden decks Bhoy!"
Of course Paddy did'nt do this out of the goodness of his heart, he made sure that the new sailor got an advance note on his first months pay ,which went into Paddy West's pocket.
A lot of sailormen from the recent past could tell you many tales of advance notes,.but the crimps and the shanghai men had long passed into history by the time our old sailormen arrived on the scene,
BrianD
I came across this yarn years ago when I picked up a book by that great old Cape Horner and Shantey Man ,Stan Hugill,the last time I saw him was when he led the singing at the Farewell to the Tall ships in the '80's.

brian daley
06-04-2010, 11:56 PM
I have dug out the words to the shanty Paddy West, I don't have the music but I think the Spinners recorded it

Paddy West
As I was walkin' down London Street,
I come to Paddy West's house,
He gave me a dish of American hash;
He called it Liverpool scouse,
He said "There's a ship and she's wantin' hands,
And on her you must sign,
The mate's a *******, the captain's worse,
But she will suit you fine."
Chorus:
Take off yer dungaree jacket,
And give yerself a rest,
And we'll think on them cold nor'westers
That we had at Paddy West's.

2. When we had finished our dinner,
Boys, the wind began to blow.
Paddy sent me to the attic,
The main-royal for to stow,
But when I got to the attic,
No main-royal could I find,
So I turned myself 'round to the window,
And I furled the window blind.
Chorus:

3. Now Paddy he pipes all hands on deck,
Their stations for to man.
His wife she stood in the doorway,
A bucket in her hand;
And Paddy he cries, "Now let 'er rip!"
And she throws the water our way,
Cryin' "Clew in the fore t'gan'sl, boys,
She's takin on the spray!"
Chorus:

4. Now seein' she's bound for the south'ard,
To Frisco she was bound;
Paddy he takes a length of rope,
And he lays it on the ground,
We all steps over, and back again,
And he says to me "That's fine,
And if ever they ask were you ever at sea
You can say you crossed the line."
Chorus:

5. To every two men that graduates,
I'll give one outfit free,
For two good men on watch at once,
Ye never need to see,
Oilskins, me boys, ye'll never want,
Carpet slippers made of felt,
I'll dish out to the pair o' you,
And a rope yarn for a belt.
Chorus:

6. Paddy says "Now pay attention,
These lessons you will learn.
The starboard is where the ship she points,
The right is called the stern,
So look ye aft, to yer starboard port
And you will find northwest."
And that's the way they teach you
At the school of Paddy West.
Chorus:

7. There's just one thing for you to do
Before you sail away,
Just step around the table,
Where the bullock's horn do lay
And if ever they ask "Were you ever at sea?"
you can say "Ten times 'round the Horn"
And Be Jesus but you're and old sailor man
From the day that you were born.
Chorus:
Put on yer dungaree jacket,
And walk out lookin' yer best,
And tell 'em that you're an old sailor man
That's come from Paddy West.

If anyone out there is interested in the tales of Shanghaiing and Liverpools murkier past ,please let me know and I can put up some more tales,
BrianD

Oddsocks
06-05-2010, 12:02 AM
Here's the YouTube Clancy Brothers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkJOh6wOa7g) version, Brian

brian daley
06-05-2010, 10:05 AM
Thanks a million Oddsocks, now I know the tune I will be able to practise and then get out busking while the good weather lasts,
BrianD

brian daley
06-06-2010, 01:49 AM
Fiddlers Green
In every major port the world over there were places that sailormen frequented and where there every need was catered for, after months at sea they were both thirsty and needful of feminine company. Liverpool’s Fiddlers Green was large ,it was to be found down Paradise Street and St Johns Street ,along Castle Street, around St Georges Church in Derby Square and in Brunswick Street. An army of prostitutes infested these thoroughfares as far as Exchange Flags and Rumford Street. The customers of these “Liverpool Judies” ,were ,in the main, sailormen. “The Liverpool; Judies have got us in tow..” was the chorus of a popular capstan song in the old days . They would accompany the drink befuddled sailors down to the docks to say goodbye to them as they sailed ,standing on the quayside yelling bawdily, as they lifted their many coloured petticoats with obscene gestures ; “Take a good look Johnny,it’ll be a long time afore yez’ll see anudder wan!!”
Around Strand Street,the Goree Piazza’s, and Back Goree, under the arches, was another hangout of these “ business girls” ; after dark they used arches as a public brothel. A lot of the “painted ladies” frequented most of the low class ,gas lighted concert-halls and theatres that Jack ashore visited. There were dance halls ,too ,such as the the Hops ,near the Teutonic Hotel ,where in the 1850’s,a sailor would dance the new fangled polka with some painted doll before going to her louse bound crib in some back jigger close by. Theatres and concert-halls fraternised by the seafaring class were Henglers Circus, where a cheap “drunk was to be had by imbibing some “rational gas”. Waitresses would circulate among the drinkers carrying goats bladders that were inflated with “laughing gas” ,two old pennies would give them a draught strong enough to make them high , a second draught would render them unconscious, and terrible things could happen to Jack ashore when he was hors de combat .Liverpool could be dangerous for the unwary!
To be continued



Liverpool Judies,
From Liverpool to 'Frisco a-rovin' I went,
For to stay in that country was my good intent.
But drinkin' strong whiskey like other **** fools,
Oh, I soon got transported back to Liverpool, singin'.

Chorus:
Roll, roll, roll bullies, roll!
Them Liverpool judies have got us in tow.

2. A smart Yankee packet lies out in the Bay,
A-waitin' a fair wind to get under way.
With all of her sailors so sick and so sore,
They'd drunk all their whiskey and can't get no more.
Chorus:

3. Oh, here comes the mate in a hell of a stew.
He's lookin' for work for us sailors to do.
Oh, it's ``Fore tops'l halyards!'' he loudly does roar,
And it's lay aloft Paddy, ye son-o'-a-*****!
Chorus:

4. One night of Cape Horn I shall never forget,
'Tis oft-times I sighs when I think of it yet.
She was divin' bows under with her sailors all wet,
She was doin' twelve knots wid her mainskys'l set.
Chorus:

5. And now we are haulin' way on to the Line,
When I thinks of it now, sure, we had a good time.
Them sea-boys box-haulin' them yards all around
For to beat that flash packet called the Thatcher MacGowan.
Chorus:

6. And now we've arrived in the Bramleymoor Dock,
And all them flash judies on the pierhead do flock.
The barrel's run dry and our five quid advance,
And I guess it's high time for to git up and dance.
Chorus:

7. Here's a health to the Captain wherever he may be,
A bucko on land and a bully at sea,
But as for the chief mate, the dirty ol' brute,
We hope when he dies straight to hell he'll skyhoot.

Again ,my thanks to Stan Hugill ,from whom I learned these tales,
BrianD

captain kong
06-06-2010, 09:37 AM
A seafaring song from an Australian lad named Reg Kear

This lad was a true Seaman, and he brings back all those memories we may have forgotten , all the words we used and the things we did. He certainly knows what he is talking about.
I think he is the Best one. He is...........
Reg Kear of: Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia

Sea Shanty Audio version at the bottom of this page....Sea Shanty.mp3

SEA SHANTY
There was Port and there was Starboard,But they used to call Port: Larboard.And the two dogs on the fo'csle held the chain.Then there's For'd and there's Aft Which is (from A'beam,) A'baft, And the Mizzen never stands A'fore the Main.There were Farmers (without pigs,) A-rabs, Lascars, Schooner Rigs, Lots of (right hand,) feeding after Ramadan.There was Panama and Mokes, And a mob of red eyed blokes From the 12 to 4 Watch, eyeing the Blackpan. You could Heave To, Broach, Careen,Two of fat and one of lean Hungry Harrisons' (from out of Liverpool.) Or 'buff with black on top 'Where the Bosun's name was Bop, And both his thumbs were Fids, (a splicing tool.) You could 'Stand By' or 'Turn To'Take the Trick from twelve til two 'Rig a Jumbo or just Holystone the Deck; Chippin'ammer 'cross the Atlantic, Whitelead'n'tallow the Triatic, Watch the Stemhead break the ice up near Quebec. There were Tabnabs, there was Scouse,Scuppers, Bulwarks, a Wheelhouse, And drums were lashed A'baft the Lazerette. You could 'Skin Out' of a Tanker,Paint the Truck a'top the Spanker, Soogie Funnels, hung on Gantlines, Fleet by Fleet.You could 'Sign On' and 'Pay Off',Turn your head away and cough; Get the 'Channels' when the orders were Lands End. Shackle to a Samson Post, Blame the Liverpool Man's Ghost, Or there's always an Allotment you could send. There were Ratlines and Crosstrees, No Blue Jeans, just Dungarees; Fifteen hundred 'Girls' for hire down in Recife. There were 'Plummers' down the 'Mouth', One of Ropner's heading south, Where the mail would go ashore at Tenerife.There were Shifting Boards and Dunnage And you knew the average tonnage Of a Port Boat, steaming by at Fifteen Knots. The Welsh Donkeyman from Hants And the slack in Trimmer's pants, And the 4 to 8 Watch, stinking in their cots. Shonky Bum Boats at Port Said, Gun'ls, Gimbals and Redlead; Roaring Forties, Round the Horn and Abadan.There were Palm and Needle Whippings, Lots of Mother Carey's chickens, And a Fine Bone China Tea Set, from Japan. There were Doxfords and Twin Screws, And the strangest looking stews Came from Galleys' where the cook was often called Names that questioned if his Dad Had been married, or just mad, Or just needed all his tackle overhauled. The Red Duster, Carrick Bend,Take a turn on the Drum End; Starboard Helm, now, Steady As She Goes. Port Side Bitts, Pacific Swells, 1 to 6 HEAVE, Seven Bells; Get that Stopper on, LOOK LIVELY ON YOUR TOES. Stockholm Tar and Cleaning Tanks, Liberty Ships and Dogger banks, Shifting Ship round to the Royal Edward Dock. Monkey's Fist, Splice with the Lay, First and Last, Logged two day's pay ,Last Pierhead Jump before She's through the Lock.Hatchboards, Coamings, Bosun's Chair,Bowsed right in under the Flare,New Year's 16 Bells (in Denmark's Esbjerg Sound.)Mouse that Hook and Masthead Light,Malacca Straits, Australian Bight,Sixteen Indian Rupees to the Pound.Oakum, Sextant, Fo'csle Head;Maracaibo, Swing the Lead;Drop the Pilot, Single Up and Spit a'lee.Capstan Full Strength, On the Rake,Sounds that sailors used to make;Merchant Seamen's sounds that floated on the sea.All these strange sounds; now they're gone;Merchant Seamen lost their song;The Iron Ships rust; the Wooden Men quietly gaze,Reminiscing in their beer,"Remember: Elson...Hopton...Kear...??""I wonder what they're doing, now-a-days."Reg Kear © 1992. AustraliaAttached Files Sea Shanty.mp3 (1.60 MB, 13 views)

brian daley
06-06-2010, 11:03 AM
That was wonderful Brian, a sailors life in one short passage.The man was a poet, was it ever recorded ?
BrianD

captain kong
06-06-2010, 01:09 PM
it is recorded, I am trying to find the Link.

Seaman_sPoem.mp3

captain kong
06-06-2010, 01:51 PM
Seaman_sPoem

I cant get it to work Brian. spent all day on it. I click onit at home but it does not transferr to here.
It is really good and it is to music.

brian daley
06-07-2010, 02:57 PM
The Henglers
As many of you Yo! Regulars will know, the Hippodrome theatre was once known as, Henglers Circus . My mother’s maiden name was Hengler and her family was Walton based.
I did not discover the Circus /theatrical connection until the middle of the 1950’s when I was watching the programme ,This Is Your Life, on the BBC. That was back in the days when Eamonn Andrews was the host. His subject that night was the ,then ,oldest working British actor,A.E. Matthews.
It was just another programme for me until Eamonn told the viewers that “Matty” ,as he was fondly known, had started out his life in show business working as a stable boy at Henglers Circus ,which was now The London Palladium. I near fell off my chair because the name was very uncommon ,apart from my close relatives ,there were no other Henglers in Liverpool.
The provenance of the name seemed to be “forgotten” ,so that night I asked my mother if there was a connection to the circus family. She was very vague in her answer, she said “ Could be son,I don’t really know.”
The next time I saw the name was in an Edwardian photograph of an old London tramcar, the advert that was on the side of the tram was for Henglers Circus. So,the mystery started to intrigue me , this was in the age before the internet and my researches were limited to asking mums siblings what they knew “not very much” was the answer. My Uncle Bill had the same streak of curiosity, he had looked for more Henglers in Phone books when he was in other towns. His job as a lorry driver took him all over the country, and he drew blanks wherever he went. One day he had to deliver a grand piano to the Shakespeare theatre , it was for the Hengler Brothers ,a duetting act. When he delivered the intrument ,he sought out the Brothers Hengler to ascertain if they were related. It turned out they were from Poland and they had picked the name Hengler from an old circus advert, they thought it was easier for advertising than their real names which was very hard for non Poles to pronounce; another dead end.
When they started to knock down the Hippodrome in the 70’s ,the original façade was exposed for the first time in near 50 years, there was a roundel upon which was the legend “Henglers Circus”
An enterprising reporter from the Liverpool Echo sought out my Uncle Bill and did a little feature ,it gave the history of Henglers Circus ,the family came from Denmark during the building of Liverpool in the 19th century. The docks ,railways and canals were all being constructed and a vast army of workmen were employed on the building. Tented cities sprang up to give shelter to the navvies and tradesman. And what they needed was, entertainment ,music halls and drinking establishment proliferated and Charles Frederick Hengler decided to come to Liverpool to make his fortune. There were something like 500,000 men employed in the building of our town , and they came from all over the world. The California Gold Rush was what some contemporary reporter reporters likened the building rush too.
The Henglers purchased some land on the site now occupied by the Grafton ,Locarno right down to the what became the Hippodrome. They built a permanent circus and had a huge menagerie too. They proved to be massively successful ,so much so, that Charles sent the elder of his two sons down to London to do the same there. The reporter from the Echo took a photo of my uncle standing in front of the newly exposed facade and the link was established, we were descended from a famous circus family.
A local brewery built a pub nearby and called it Henglers Circus and invited my uncle to open it.
But the question remained, how did our family go from riches to rags?.
45 years ago I found a book, by Stan Hugill, in a second hand bookshop. It was about Sailor towns of the world, it told of the lowlife side of the worlds major ports during the heyday of Sail. It listed the towns from A to Z and ,when I came to Liverpool I got the shock of my life. He rated Henglers Circus as the lowest of the low. Old Charles was dead and his youngest son found that there was more money to be made out of prostitution and the selling of drunken sailors to crimps who then supplied the stiffs to the shanghai merchants ,of which Liverpool had more than a few. To ensure that he got his quota of stiffs ,he introduced the “rational gas” ,two pennorth would get you drunk as you sucked it out of the goat bladder, two pennorth more would knock you out for the count and you would very likely wake up on a coffin ship that was bound for Davy Jones’s locker as part of an insurance scam by crooked ship owners and evil ship masters. Things became so bad that the City fathers closed the circus and it was turned back in to a place of proper entertainment. Was this why my Grandma never spoke of Henglers Circus? I dined out on the tale for more than a few years,if you are going to have a skeleton in your cupboard it’s best if they are “interesting”.
My young cousin Robbie started to do a family tree through the internet, he got right back to the 1850’s when he hit a block. The man who was the founder of our family was picked up in Jersey ,he was an Alien with very little English, his name was so unpronounceable that he was given an easier name, one from a circus poster…….Hengler.
That was the real reason, we were not Henglers at all !!!. I ‘d love to find out where my great, great Grandfather came from,
BrianD

captain kong
06-10-2010, 10:54 PM
Brian , he actually came from Bolton, so you are decended from a Woolyback. He was from a family of Flemish weavers who where asylum seekers fleeing the Huguenot Persicutions of the 17th century.

brian daley
06-11-2010, 12:19 AM
I'll have to get my young cousin to investigate that Brian, I don't mind being descended from a stateless alien,but bugger being descended from a Woollyback,
BrianD

captain kong
06-11-2010, 12:20 PM
Wreck of the Mexico

On the evening of December 9th 1886 the German barque `Mexico`, originally named John Bull and built in 1860 by Oswalds of Sunderland before being bought by Messrs Ostling Gerbruder and renamed `Mexico`, got into difficulties off the Southport coast.

Three lifeboats carrying 44 men went to her rescue, only one lifeboat and 17 men returned. Two lifeboats and 27 men were lost resulting in the worst tragedy ever in the annals of the RNLI. Subsequently Lifeboat Saturday was conceived, bringing in much-needed funds to the completely voluntary RNLI service.


The wreck of the MEXICO
Up goes the Lytham signal, St. Annes has summoned hands,
Knee-deep in surf the lifeboat is launched abreast of Southport Sands,
Half-deafened by the screaming wind, half-blinded by the rain,
Three crews await their Coxswains to face the hurricane.
The stakes are death or duty, no man has answered No !
Lives must be saved out yonder, on the good ship Mexico.

Did ever night look blacker, did sea so hiss before !
Did ever women's voices wail more piteous on the shore,
But from three ports of Lancashire that night went lifeboats three,
To fight a splended battle, manned by Warriors of the Sea.
When on dark nights of winter, fierce storms of wind and rain

Howl round the cosy homestead, and lash the window-pane,
When over hill and treetop we hear the tempest roar
And hurricanes go sweeping on from valley to the shore,
And those we love the best on earth are gathered in our homes,

Think of the sailors round our coasts who, braving sleet and snow,
Leave sweethearts, wives and little ones when duty bids them go.
Think of our sea-girt Island, a harbour where alone
No Englishman to save a life has failed to risk his own
Then when the storm howls loudest, pray of your charity
That God will bless the lifeboat, and the Warriors of the Sea.

Poem writer is unknown.

Painting by that wonderful Artist E.D. Walker.

brian daley
06-12-2010, 01:04 AM
A moving poem and a stark painting to accompany it,good post Brian, thank you,
BrianD

wsteve55
06-12-2010, 02:19 AM
The Henglers
As many of you Yo! Regulars will know, the Hippodrome theatre was once known as, Henglers Circus . My mother’s maiden name was Hengler and her family was Walton based.
I did not discover the Circus /theatrical connection until the middle of the 1950’s when I was watching the programme ,This Is Your Life, on the BBC. That was back in the days when Eamonn Andrews was the host. His subject that night was the ,then ,oldest working British actor,A.E. Matthews.
It was just another programme for me until Eamonn told the viewers that “Matty” ,as he was fondly known, had started out his life in show business working as a stable boy at Henglers Circus ,which was now The London Palladium. I near fell off my chair because the name was very uncommon ,apart from my close relatives ,there were no other Henglers in Liverpool.
The provenance of the name seemed to be “forgotten” ,so that night I asked my mother if there was a connection to the circus family. She was very vague in her answer, she said “ Could be son,I don’t really know.”
The next time I saw the name was in an Edwardian photograph of an old London tramcar, the advert that was on the side of the tram was for Henglers Circus. So,the mystery started to intrigue me , this was in the age before the internet and my researches were limited to asking mums siblings what they knew “not very much” was the answer. My Uncle Bill had the same streak of curiosity, he had looked for more Henglers in Phone books when he was in other towns. His job as a lorry driver took him all over the country, and he drew blanks wherever he went. One day he had to deliver a grand piano to the Shakespeare theatre , it was for the Hengler Brothers ,a duetting act. When he delivered the intrument ,he sought out the Brothers Hengler to ascertain if they were related. It turned out they were from Poland and they had picked the name Hengler from an old circus advert, they thought it was easier for advertising than their real names which was very hard for non Poles to pronounce; another dead end.
When they started to knock down the Hippodrome in the 70’s ,the original façade was exposed for the first time in near 50 years, there was a roundel upon which was the legend “Henglers Circus”
An enterprising reporter from the Liverpool Echo sought out my Uncle Bill and did a little feature ,it gave the history of Henglers Circus ,the family came from Denmark during the building of Liverpool in the 19th century. The docks ,railways and canals were all being constructed and a vast army of workmen were employed on the building. Tented cities sprang up to give shelter to the navvies and tradesman. And what they needed was, entertainment ,music halls and drinking establishment proliferated and Charles Frederick Hengler decided to come to Liverpool to make his fortune. There were something like 500,000 men employed in the building of our town , and they came from all over the world. The California Gold Rush was what some contemporary reporter reporters likened the building rush too.
The Henglers purchased some land on the site now occupied by the Grafton ,Locarno right down to the what became the Hippodrome. They built a permanent circus and had a huge menagerie too. They proved to be massively successful ,so much so, that Charles sent the elder of his two sons down to London to do the same there. The reporter from the Echo took a photo of my uncle standing in front of the newly exposed facade and the link was established, we were descended from a famous circus family.
A local brewery built a pub nearby and called it Henglers Circus and invited my uncle to open it.
But the question remained, how did our family go from riches to rags?.
45 years ago I found a book, by Stan Hugill, in a second hand bookshop. It was about Sailor towns of the world, it told of the lowlife side of the worlds major ports during the heyday of Sail. It listed the towns from A to Z and ,when I came to Liverpool I got the shock of my life. He rated Henglers Circus as the lowest of the low. Old Charles was dead and his youngest son found that there was more money to be made out of prostitution and the selling of drunken sailors to crimps who then supplied the stiffs to the shanghai merchants ,of which Liverpool had more than a few. To ensure that he got his quota of stiffs ,he introduced the “rational gas” ,two pennorth would get you drunk as you sucked it out of the goat bladder, two pennorth more would knock you out for the count and you would very likely wake up on a coffin ship that was bound for Davy Jones’s locker as part of an insurance scam by crooked ship owners and evil ship masters. Things became so bad that the City fathers closed the circus and it was turned back in to a place of proper entertainment. Was this why my Grandma never spoke of Henglers Circus? I dined out on the tale for more than a few years,if you are going to have a skeleton in your cupboard it’s best if they are “interesting”.
My young cousin Robbie started to do a family tree through the internet, he got right back to the 1850’s when he hit a block. The man who was the founder of our family was picked up in Jersey ,he was an Alien with very little English, his name was so unpronounceable that he was given an easier name, one from a circus poster…….Hengler.
That was the real reason, we were not Henglers at all !!!. I ‘d love to find out where my great, great Grandfather came from,
BrianD

Hi Brian,
Hengler's circus was then in it's 3rd home,after previously being at Newington,and Dale st.(where Municipal buildings is now!) Here are a couple of sites which might be of use!

http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/new.htm
http://www.liverpoolrevival.org.uk/moody2.htm

brian daley
06-12-2010, 09:39 AM
HI Steve, thanks for that link, it makes the story even murkier. Hoe did Henglers Circus go from being a den of iniquity to being a place fit for Christian revivalism? Perhaps someone out there knows the real story;I'd love to hear it,
BrianD

brian daley
06-21-2010, 01:37 AM
Shanghai
When Britains merchant fleet was at its greatest there was a dearth of experienced crewmen, the royal Navy was still”impressing “ merchant men and fishermen to fill the fighting ships. A trade grew up in all the major ports, a trade that was so odious that seamen went in fear of it, a step up from slavery, it went by many names ,but it all meant the same…Shanghaiing!
This was a trade in bodies,live ones , men who could be used to fill the shorthanded ships.
The shanghai merchants were known as Crimps ,they were boarding house masters, running cheap doss houses where Jack ashore would get his head down. A little extra in his bedtime drink ensured that his sleeping form could be sold to the skipper of a “blood boat” who would’nt otherwise get a crew.
The Crimp could also be a shipping master who would work in league with the boarding house masters in getting suitable candidates for the hell ships.
Not all shipping masters were bent, but sufficient were to keep this hungry trade in flesh flourishing.
The crimps demanded that all men shipped must pass through their hands , a sailor coming to sign on of his own free will,was not to be considered ,because the crimp would lose out on his commission.
If the shipping master did not work hand in glove with the crimps ,he would be warned that,when he wanted a crew,he would be unable to find one. In some places ,such as the American West coast,the shipping master would supply a crew at 5 dollars a head.
Another member of the shanghaiing fraternity was the Runner. This was a despicable character who used every trick in the book to get the crews of incoming vessels to desert the present berth and to sign on a blood boat. One of the stratagems used was to board the ship as she was heading to her berth, the runner and his bucko mates would help the lads square away the sails and make the ship ready for loading or unloading. They would piece off the cock of the walk( the leading hand) with enough coin to get the lads lashed ,and as soon as they were out of it he would transfer their sleeping forms to the boarding house owned by the crimp. The runners were hard men who used their fists ,boots and black jacks,to make sure that Jack ashore gave no trouble.
It was in such ways that many ships gained their crews. When times were really hard ,it was not unknown for a crimp to soak the body of some poor stiff with rum and pass the corpse off as another dead drunk crew man.
The whole chain of people involved in crimping, from the boarding house master ,right down to the boatmen who ferried the comatose crew men out to the hellships, gained their money from the sailors advance note. This was usually two months pay, times that by the crew of square rigger and you have a considerable haul. No wonder there were so many sea shanties about poor ,unwary sailors, Jack ashore was lucky if he ever made it home with his pay off,
BrianD

Ken Berry
10-07-2010, 12:43 PM
Hi Again Captain Kong, Bill Dailey, Pablo42, Oddsocks, and the ones I can;t remember the names of.Well I have just spent the last 5 hours readinf all the emaisl and enlarging the ship photos and I feel a lot beter for it. I believe an Eric Newby was one of the seven survivors after the Sagamors was sunk in 1917 and he wrote a book about it. Does anyone have any idea if it is true,Have tried umpteen Book sites no luck to date. Have tried to find the Alfred Edward Berry or family about his exploits as a Mineswweeper Trawler Skipper and Chief Skipper WW1. He was from Hull and was single and came out of the navy. Was not on the 1918 listings.Any one from Hull, help would be appreciated as his papers are all clearly readable. In fact fasinating he was a courageous man. Stilll trying to find my G/Dad as he was on minesweepers as well. Have a few shots of Liverpool tugs will start staying with the site more now as I have my Complete new knee now.Done most of my rellie researches. Funny you mentioning about Mauii Captain Kong.Dived on a American Submarine of Laihana,I had 2 japanese to look after and a whale and a calf came alongside us from astern
The 2 kids 21-24 married started to hyper they were going through their oxy like it was going out of fashion. The Mum Whales Eye had intellegence in it and I maintain it was thinking whats those two nuts doing blowing all their air away underwater,I do that on the surface, So she went up with the calf and broached and came down again. This time she was within 15ftand singing away at the calf to stay right next to her. And that eye had intelligencedon't know what it was but she was saying something different. We found a big fan of black Coral forming on one of the for'ard torpedo tube.She is locked at all her hatches as navy divers are trained their. That banyon tree. Beautiful. Have you seen the US Navy's newest Aircraft Carrier bigger than any of the other 8 or is it 9.Good to be back hope your Op went OK. They had a couple of goes at me to see if i was still Ticking. Bset Regards to One and All. Ken Berry:handclap:

captain kong
10-07-2010, 06:31 PM
Hi Ken.
That was a good experience swimming alongside the whales, I havent done that. I am going back to Lahaina on Maui in March so I may have a go if I get the chance. There certainly are a lot of whales there leaping about just off the beach, Fascinating.
That Banyan tree is certainly fascinating, I believe it is the biggest in the world.
Hope you are better after your ops. I have to see the Sugeon in two weeks for a check up, otherwise I am OK from the two I had after the argument with the Elephant Seal in the Antarctic. I have one op pending on the goolie so I put that one on the back burner for a while.
Cheers
Brian..

Ken Berry
10-08-2010, 12:12 PM
Hi Captain Kong,
its just over 20years ago when I dived and it was the dive shop opposite the Banyon Tree,Think it was American dive. The Sub.is 90ft down,the say we went down the water was that clear we could almost see San Diego. The Dive Master will say he will drop the hook on the Hand Rail round the Conning Tower any bets on for missing it. I was the prize prat that day. Cost me a couple of cases of Budweiser,but well worth it as we didn't drink it till we got ashore. Ended up nicely by 4pm when the wife arrived to pick me up. The Dive Master was quite a guy,he explained about the whale and the two Japanese kids would have made me Emperor for the day.Then he told her to take me to the gold shop further down the main drag where the well known Whale guy had his shop. Just had a look at it as I remembered he engraves his name on the back. Wylands One is about and an inch and 11/4 across the flukes of just a whales tail. And the other is of a Hump Back about 3 1/2 inches long actually perfect in every detail. So the dive cost a fortune in the end.But I tell you what Captain every time the one who will be obeyed wears either one. Every time some one will comment about them. So take some spare cash. Those Islands are as close to Paradise as one can get on Earth. If you can do the 5 Island flight that starts about 6-3oam till about 7pm.Well worth it.It finishes as the approach of the Torpedo Bombers did on the "Day of Infamy". Hell its gone 11pm and I can hear the growls coming from the main bedroom. Good night One and All Best Regards Ken B

brian daley
10-14-2010, 04:44 PM
Saint Columba
The triple screw Clyde passenger vessel Saint Columba was built in 1912 by Wm.Denny & Bros. Of Dumbarton as Queen Alexandra (11) for Turbine Steamers Ltd.. In 1935she was acquired by David MacBrayne Ltd., renamed and extensively remodelled ,in particular by the addition of the third funnel and her second mast. During World War Two she was requisitioned as an accommodation vessel for Boom Defence personnel in Greenock and she was eventually broken up in Port Glasgow in 1958, This study was by a little known artist called J.C. McConnochie ,no other details.
BrianD
17531

captain kong
10-14-2010, 08:40 PM
17532

Here is a photo of the old Queen Elizabeth arriving at Pier 90 New York, in the 50s .

the big gasometer ahead of the `United States` has now gone.

gregs dad
10-15-2010, 07:08 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4129/5083739964_6b6e5dc0aa.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/5083739964/)
R M S Carinthia at the Pierhead in 1961,scanned off a Kodachrome slide, taken with a 200mm lens. A frequent visitor to Liverpool,she changed names a few times before being broken up in India 2006 R M S Carinthia 1956-68
S S Fair Land 1968-71
S S Fair Sea 1971-88
S S Fair Princess 1988-2000
S S China Sea Discovery 2000-05

captain kong
10-15-2010, 08:03 PM
Hi Gregs Dad
I was on the Carinthia in 1961 as a Quartermaster.[ the guy who steered the ship] Wev had a murder on her that year.
Cheers
Brian.

gregs dad
10-16-2010, 09:54 PM
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee283/exactavarex/yoll/Doric-04.jpg
R M S Doric from an old postcard.
My Grandad died on this while she was in the Huskisson dock. He was operating a winch when his coat was caught up and he was dragged in. No health and safety in those days

captain kong
10-20-2010, 06:46 PM
This is a painting of the SS Contractor, one of TJ Harrosons
of Liverpool, built in 1930.
She was sunk by the Germans on 7th August 1943.
dont know the painter but the picture is superb,
it captures the old ship wallowing in a heavy sea,


17589

GeorgePorgie
10-20-2010, 09:01 PM
Do you have memories if them too!

I do,Brian

Been back tracking my jobs for a reason....was on the Tynlwald when the Summerland went up in 73...was on quayside watching this giantic ball of flames that lasted for some time into the night,terrible tradgedy of lives lost and at the hands of a gang youths setting fire to a kiosk adjacent to the summerland complex.

Most of the fleet of the IOM boats ferried the coffins to their destinations home,I remember,even though the coffins were sealed you could still smell the burnt flesh as you passed the cargo hold on mid deck.

brian daley
11-07-2010, 09:12 PM
The Asturias
The Royal Mail Steam Packet Companys passenger liner Asturias was built by Harland & Wolff Ltd of Belfast in 1925 for the service to the east coast of South America and was also used occasionally for cruises. She is shown here at anchor off a tropical port, wearing the Merchant Jack at the stem, the R.M.S,P. Co. house-flag at the main mast and the Red Ensign at the peak , while disembarking passengers into tenders, the foremost of which is also wearing the prominent R.M.S.P.Co. house-flag.
The study was by J. Guthrie and there are no details available, save for the fact that he had a working knowledge of ships,
BrianD

captain kong
11-09-2010, 12:39 PM
Here is the ESSO DALRIADA in the Gulf of Suez at Ain Sukhna, discharging 280,000 tons of crude oil from Kharg in Iran in 1978, it goes through an underwater pipeline to the shore then pumped acrsoss the Egyptian desert, the SUMED Line, to a port near Alexandria to be transhipped in another tanker to Europe, that saves the ship going round the Cape of Good Hope saving six weeks at sea and also 8 weeks on the return to the Gulf empty.
I took the photo from the wheel house.

captain kong
11-09-2010, 01:25 PM
Here is the propellor and rudder of the SS GREAT BRITAIN in the dry dock where she was built in Bristol. Well worth a visit if you are near Bristol



"The ss Great Britain was a world first when she was launched in Bristol in 1843. This uniquely successful ship design brought together new technologies in a way which transformed world travel.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the most daring of the great Victorian engineers, conceived the groundbreaking combination of a screw propeller, an iron hull, and a massive 1000-horsepower steam engine.

She was immediately successful - on her maiden voyage across the Atlantic the ss Great Britain easily broke the previous speed record.

Although effectively a prototype, she continued sailing until 1886, and travelled thirty-two times around the world and nearly one million miles at sea.

She was finally abandoned in the Falkland Islands, in 1937, after more than 40 years use as a floating warehouse.

In 1970 an ambitious salvage effort brought her home to Bristol, where today she is conserved in the dry dock where she was originally built. " brunel institute.

Samsette
11-10-2010, 06:00 AM
Old Brunel was a man born before his time. That propellor resembles the kind you now see on some of the world's behomeths, although a bit smaller.

captain kong
11-10-2010, 12:44 PM
As a comparison to the Great Britain`s Prop when she was the worlds biggest ship, here are the props on the Propulsion Pods on the Queen Mary 2. She has four pods, two of them rotate 360 degrees and are used to steer the ship, She does not have a rudder.The QM2 prop pulls the ship through the water, the GBs prop pushes the ship through the water.
160 Years later his idea of a propellor is still basically the same.

Here spare Propellor blades on the foredeck, The Console in the wheel house used for berthing, contains controls for thrusters, engines , steering etc. The Pod, Me on left enjoying a pre dinner cocktail, A view of the Wheel house, and then all four pods. I think Isambard would have enjoyed this, but I guess it all came from him in the first place. He was certainly ahead of his time.
1778917791177881779217790

Samsette
11-11-2010, 01:33 AM
I was thinking more of the blooming great propellors on the tankers and box boats. As an aside, Carnival Splendor is wallowing, powerless, two hundred miles out from Ensanada. The USN is flying in crates of Spam, to tide them over until tugs can tow her to port.
I'll bet they don't serve Spam on Cunard - at least, not to bloods.

captain kong
11-11-2010, 01:37 PM
Hi Malc, the props for the biggest box boats are around nine and a half metres in diameter and weigh around 100 tons. See photo.
When I was on the ESSO NORTHUMBRIA, 256,000 TONS, we broke down off Cape Town, we had to ballast her down by the head and raise the prop and rudder clear of the water so the shore engineers could work on it. she had a one metre bend amidships, bent like a big banana, I guess the propellor was around 30 feet at least in diameter. My photos of it have been lost.

Cunard is part of Carnival they just use it as a marketing name brand. I have just had a court case against Cunard, but it was altered to Carnival,

Helicopters from the USS Ronald Reagan flew hundreds of cases of Spam to the Splendor with fresh water in bottles. No doubt some of those superb Chefs on Cunard could do wonders with a case of SPAM, I like it. They were unable to cook, no power, and they could not flush the toilets, what a stink for those blue rinse matrons.

It now seems they are towing her to San Diego. It would seem all her main engine room power is down and the emergency generator is the only engine running.
On these ships you must remember the power needed for hotel services that is air conditioning , sewage, galleys, fridges, lights, lifts and all the rest is very substantial and emergency generators cant supply it. I am not familiar with the Carnival Splendor but her full hotel service load could be in the thousands of Kilowatts needing a substantial diesel engine. [JIMMY BMN site,]

Here are the props of the Titanic, three of them,.and the prop for the worlds biggest container ship with six blades just as Isambard Brunel had on the GB,

1780017801

brian daley
11-17-2010, 01:10 AM
The Boston Vanguard GY421

The Grimsby trawler Boston Vanguard GY 421 was built by VosperLtd. In Portsmouth in 1957 for the St Andrews Steam Fishing Company ,a subsidiary of Boston Deep Sea Fisheries. Sold to French owners and renamed in 1962 , and twice more subsequently ,she continued fishing until 1980, when she was converted into an oil-rig stand-by vessel. She was scrapped by Thames Shipbreakers Ltd. in 1986.

This study was by George Wiseman, a well known artist of fishing vessels.

captain kong
11-17-2010, 12:44 PM
EXCELLENT PAINTING, VERY GOOD DETAILS.

brian daley
11-17-2010, 11:45 PM
The Wicklow

The passenger, cargo and livestock carrier Wicklow was built by Blackwood and Gordon of Port Glasgow in 1895 for the Dublin- Liverpool service of the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company. In 1919 she was sold to the British & Irish Steam Packet Company, whose funnel livery and house-flag she is wearing in this portrait and by whom in the following year she was renamed Lady Wicklow. Requisitioned by H.M. Government during both World Wars and briefly employed as a transport for the Irish Free State Army in 1922, she was eventually broken up in 1949.
The portrait is by an unknown artist who has an unmistakeable style,there two other paintings of steamships which are attributed to him and,like the one here,are both Irish sea steamers.


17838

captain kong
11-18-2010, 01:51 PM
One of my favourite paintings, George Vancouver`s ships surveying the Pacific North West in the 1790s, city of Vancouver named after him,


by MARK MEYERS
17839

Oudeis
11-18-2010, 02:58 PM
And numbered prints can be yours CK for only...

http://www.gallerydirectart.com/dealer-gallery-of-fine-art-prints---posters-top-sellers-mark-meyers.html

GeorgePorgie
11-18-2010, 03:35 PM
One of my favourite paintings, George Vancouver`s ships

You have to admire the artist who paint ships of this calibre,somuch painstaking detail goes into them...endless hours of burning the midnight oil...makin mistakes along the way and correcting them...these type of paintings are no mean feat to accomplish and their value(money) is peanuts even when they fetch thousands.

I hope to aspire to this level one day? :)

captain kong
11-18-2010, 04:16 PM
HE IS AN INCREDIBLE ARTIST,
I only wish I could do that. I know I have no chance of doing so.

Samsette
11-18-2010, 08:45 PM
Very nice depiction of a scene from his voyage of discovery. Cook had missed the entrance into the straits that were to be later named after Juan de Fuca, but Vancouver entered them and chartered most of our inland waters, as evident today by the names he gave to prominent features, from Puget Sound to the Gulf of Georgia. That scene is of the ships Discovery and Chatham, and probably intended to be near to the present city of Vancouver, either off Point Grey or in Burrard Inlet.

A nice picture, Cap'n. showing the Salish people's dugout cedar canoes to advantage.

captain kong
11-18-2010, 08:50 PM
Thanks Malc, I didnt know the names of the two ships, I know there is a statue of him outside the Vancouver Museum.
Cheers.
Brian.

captain kong
11-18-2010, 09:58 PM
here is a photo of a wave about to overwhelm the Matina, a Fyffes banana boat, we were on our way to Jamaica for bananas, just near the Azores., I got wet.

GeorgePorgie
11-18-2010, 10:52 PM
This is a nicen.

captain kong
11-18-2010, 10:56 PM
How do they do it, so sharp and clear, superb paintings.


Now for something different.............
In November 1975, the Iron Ore Ship EDMUND FITZGERALD was sunk with all hands in a terrible hurricane in the Great Lakes.
here is the story and the song turn on the sound, Those lakes have had a terrible death toll for those Lakers.

http://home.pacbell.net/chabpyne/index.html AND HERE IS THE SONG BY GORDEN LIGHTFOOT http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJhtr...eature=related

from the BMN site posted by Bill Roberts.

GeorgePorgie
11-18-2010, 11:15 PM
I have not found this out as of yet Kong but...there is a technique that could give precise detail and its called the Layering technique.

A detailed drawing is done first with pencil and then transparent layers are built up over the drawing,the layers can consist of 5 to 15 layers depending on the depth you want to achieve,this takes time but the esult is some stunning artwork.

To speed up the oil paint layers a gel called "Liquin" is used in the paint,the brush is dipped in the liquin and then the paint and applied to the area to paint,the Liquin takes about 18 hours to dry give or take a couple of hours.

This is one way of securing a detailed painting.

Oudeis
11-19-2010, 12:02 AM
There must be others...


http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409869

GeorgePorgie
11-19-2010, 11:22 AM
Titanic...post #11 as a postcard. :)

captain kong
11-19-2010, 01:23 PM
QUOTE=Oudeis;309193]There must be others...


http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409869[/QUOTE]

Good one, I have never ever used oil paints, I would not know how to start. I have only done water colours from a childrens water paint box. I did a water colour of a sailing ship, on the canvas side of a piece of hardboard that I found on my ship. I painted and painted it over and over again, I took it away with me to Sea on my ships and only did it now and again for ten years building up the thickness of the water colour paint until it was quite thick in the relevent places, then I had it framed. It is about two square feet of board.

17845[

Oudeis
11-19-2010, 01:53 PM
Well done you CK. I like that it is all ship.

GeorgePorgie
11-19-2010, 02:14 PM
I would not know how to start.

There's no magic in painting with oils,Kong

The ground can be either canvas or MDF wood,both need sealing with "Gesso" a few times so the the oils do not penatrate into the ground.

Canvas panels can be bought already on a stretcher at Home and Bargain stores at £1.29 small and £1.99 large,MDF can be got at any wood supplier or handyman store.

Oils are dear but the cheapest proffesional brands can be used and basically Red,Green,Blue,Yellow,White,Black is allthe colous you will need as these will produce 90% of any coloua you encounterby mixing together.

Oils take an age to dry ie the painting cannot be varnished for at least six to twelve months depending on the thickness of the oil applied to the canvass.

Turps is for thinning the paint.
Although the oils in the tube already contain Linseed or Poppy Oil? the oil paint can be used straight from the tube ie on the pallete,if the paint is too thick you add a bit of linseed and turps to weaken it.

A drawing in pencil or charcoal is then drawn upon the support and just coloured in with the oil paints.

Thats it in a nutshell,you do have to know something about what colours make a colour to get you to a desired colour but it can be picked up anywhere on the net as to what colours make it up.

Painting in oils is far much easier than using Watercolours or Acrylics as they stay wet longer than the latter which tend to dry immediatly,also oil paints are moe forgiving and can be blended seamlessly togther eaily with a light brush.

---------- Post added at 01:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:04 PM ----------

These are student brand oils but are of notable quality..quite cheap as well.
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DALER-ROWNEY-Georgian-Oil-Paints-Set-10x30ml-061400-/120649099436?pt=UK_Crafts_DrawingSupplies_EH&hash=item1c173f28ac

Oudeis
11-19-2010, 02:18 PM
I have had a quick shufty google-wise and there are online free lessons in this and that technique. There may be evening classes or amateur art clubs around near where you (all) live.
The twenty-first century is NOT a time for 'if onlys', but WHY NOTs. At the very least what all of you show (exhibit?) here is that you well know what it is you want in an end-result, the discovering of how to get there by this road or that must be a great deal easier in this internet age. And free, you take what you want from anywhere you want. You make me green with envy with the drive and dedication you all display. And you seem to enjoy what you do (after a fashion;-eh George?) and I and many others get a lot out of seeing the results of your labours. More/all power to your elbows. :)

GeorgePorgie
11-19-2010, 03:10 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrTkJaU2ouE

---------- Post added at 01:46 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:31 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ue-4gm8Bbhk

---------- Post added at 01:54 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:46 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBKTl2tAhw0&feature=player_embedded#at=13[COLOR="Silver"]

---------- Post added at 01:57 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:54 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ak0kljm47Xc

---------- Post added at 02:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:57 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTylriI-BqY

---------- Post added at 02:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:01 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pn3xpn7DBz8

---------- Post added at 02:07 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:06 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlFMtGm9BO0

---------- Post added at 02:10 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:07 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVwahnFDRgs

captain kong
11-19-2010, 07:01 PM
Hi George that is fantastic information there . Looks easy, A lot of people have told me that water colours are harder than oils, but I have never tried them, I will have a go at it, with a little help from those videos next time I do some painting.
Cheers
Brian

GeorgePorgie
11-19-2010, 07:29 PM
Kong,with watercolours you're pressed for time,that is its hard to mix colours on the paper and blend it well...oils are quite the opposite and don't put pressure on the artist.....you can go for a stroll and come back and erase that mistakeyou made before going on the stroll....can you do that in watercolours? Ithink not. :)

---------- Post added at 06:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:11 PM ----------

What browser are you using? there are applications where you can save these vids and burn them to a DVD for watching at your liesure.

---------- Post added at 06:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:14 PM ----------

I should have started with part 1.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWsxoSVujjw

---------- Post added at 06:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:19 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4FzU41WBiE

---------- Post added at 06:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:23 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2x58GrfnY-I

---------- Post added at 06:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:25 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcsPfuSQRqo

---------- Post added at 06:27 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:26 PM ----------

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUwxcFL_miI[/video]

---------- Post added at 06:29 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:27 PM ----------


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUwxcFL_miI

captain kong
11-30-2010, 04:30 PM
17937

This is the Portugese passenger ship FUNCHAL,
MV Funchal is a Portuguese-registered passenger and cruise liner.
Funchal has been successfully serving the British cruise market over the past 20 years carrying thousands of passengers and was the first vessel to join the Classic International Cruises fleet in 1984. Funchal is a classic cruise liner with a beautiful profile and charming interiors and has a fascinating and proud maritime heritage having served as a Portuguese Presidential yacht for state visits. Funchal was also once owned by one of the wealthiest families in the Azores.
She will begin a cruise program in South Australia.
Stabilised, air-conditioned, three lifts, main show lounge (Ilha Verde), piano bar (Porto Bar) Gama Lounge, Club Room, library, card room, lido bar, shop, photo shop, medical centre, excursion office and reception with exchange facilities
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Funchal"

I joined the FUNCHAL in Fremantle Australia after meeting an old mate I hadnt seen for 50 years, 1956, Joe Finnegan, ex Liverpool, he was now living in Australia. I was at the Perth airport and he told me he was sailing back to Liverpool for a holiday. My flights were booked so I had to fly to Sydney 3000 miles east then to Singapore. I said to the Long Haired one, `Why are we going home` she said `I dont know`, So I cancelled the flight to England and found another one that was going to Perth. in Oz.
I found Joe again and he took me to the travel Agent and I booked a six week voyage to Liverpool on the FUNCHAL. calling at Singapore again, Phuket, Goa, Safaga, Suez and a trip to the Pyramids and the Cairo Museum , through the Suez Canal to Athens and the Lisbon then docking in Stanley Dock. An excellent trip. Joe and I had a good trip reminscing about the old days when we sailed on Cunard and Canadian Pacific.
In the Northern summer she sails around europe and in the winter she sails around Australia.
She is much better than the new big ships that are like a block of flats carrying 4000 passengers.

brian daley
11-30-2010, 09:36 PM
Hi Brian, the Funchal looks very familiar, was she an ex-Canadian Pacific liner? Nice photo,
BrianD

captain kong
12-01-2010, 10:31 AM
No Brian,
I think you are thinking of the De Grasse named Empress of Australi, that was brought in to replace the Empress of Canada after she was burnt.
The FUNCHAL was the ex Presidential yacht of Portugal.

brian daley
12-10-2010, 12:23 AM
I received this postcard this morning, it shows the,then,current royal yacht,carrying Queen Victoria through the lines of warships for the Spithead Naval Regatta. There was no information as to what her name was ,or the year it was taking place in. I searched through my picture library and could not find a vessel that matched her specification,i.e. a 2 masted steam paddle vessel.There were quite a few yachts listed as being royal but not one that had all the attributes shown here. Anyone out there got any ideas?
BrianD

18015

az_gila
12-10-2010, 07:01 AM
I received this postcard this morning, it shows the,then,current royal yacht,carrying Queen Victoria through the lines of warships for the Spithead Naval Regatta. There was no information as to what her name was ,or the year it was taking place in. I searched through my picture library and could not find a vessel that matched her specification,i.e. a 2 masted steam paddle vessel.There were quite a few yachts listed as being royal but not one that had all the attributes shown here. Anyone out there got any ideas?
BrianD

18015

Some info here....

In 1842 the young Queen Victoria and Prince Albert held a "Grand Naval Review." They inspected the Queen. There was little change in the ships, but officers and men looked very different. The old uniform had gone and officers wore their cocked hats "fore-and-aft," instead of"athwartships." Epaulettes had come in and, instead of breeches and buckled shoes, officers wore gold-laced trousers and black pumps. Seamen wore baggy trousers, short jackets, white-taped blue collars, and black silk scarves, set off by a beribboned straw hat. The Queen on this occasion endeared herself to her sailors, drinking a mess basin of grog, and liking it!

http://battleshiphmsvanguard.homestead.com/tp.gifBut times were changing. When the Queen, in 1845, inspected the experimental squadron, she used the new Victoria and Albert, first of the two paddlers, and the Board of Admiralty attended in their steam yacht, the Black Eagle. This was the last time that a Royal Review consisted only of sailing ships, and nearly the last time that the Queen could watch the Trafalgar's men run aloft and set the sails "with feline agility and astonishing celerity."

from this site -

http://battleshiphmsvanguard.homestead.com/PastReviews.html

Could it have been the first HMY Victoria and Albert? There seem to have been three with that name, but I can't find a picture of the first one...

Good on the Queen drinking some grog in a mess basin and not royal china.....:Smiliz_Kingz_PDT_13

brian daley
01-05-2011, 12:06 AM
18215

The schooner rigged wooden paddle-steamships PRINCE FREDERICK and GAZELLE,of 1823 and1832 respectively,were owned by the Hull Steam Packet Company,the first operators from that port, and ran between Hull and London during the months of summer. PRINCE FREDERICK was wrecked on Corton Sands, near Yarmouth in 1835,but the GAZELLE is recorded as having been still in service to Antwerp and Bremen as late as 1850.
This painting is attributed to John Wilson Carmichael, the foremost Tyneside marine artist of the 19th century.

brian daley
01-08-2011, 01:23 AM
This is a painting of Captain James Cook's ship HM Barque Endeavour and it shows her heading up the English Channel after his extraordinary cicumnavigation of the world. The voyage lasted 2 years and 11 months during which he chartered thousands of miles of unknown coast lines.
The study is oil on canvas and was painted by Robin Brooks
BrianD
18256

brian daley
01-08-2011, 06:54 PM
This is the Santisima Trinidad,a Spanish First Rate ship of the line. She was the largest ship in the world,mountig four decks of artillery and fought in many battles including ,Cape Spartel, Cape St Vincent and the Battle of Trafalgar. She fought with distinction in her final battle and struck her colours to HMS Prince but she was so badly damaged that her captors removed every living thing from her,including a cat. The largest ship in the world then sank beneath the waves .
This painting was by Geoff Hunt and is oil on canvas,
BrianD

18257

dazza
01-08-2011, 07:16 PM
This is a painting of Captain James Cook's ship HM Barque Endeavour and it shows her heading up the English Channel after his extraordinary cicumnavigation of the world. The voyage lasted 2 years and 11 months during which he chartered thousands of miles of unknown coast lines.
The study is oil on canvas and was painted by Robin Brooks
BrianD
18256

HM Bark Endeavour, with the sun behind her sails.

18259

We have the Victory at Portsmouth. What we need now is a reproduction of a 74 that could be taken out to sea. Something like HMS Bellerophon...or 'Billy Ruffian' to the Tars that sailed her.

brian daley
01-08-2011, 09:51 PM
Hi Dazza,
That was a great photograph,have you got anymore?
BrianD

dazza
01-08-2011, 10:44 PM
18261182761827518274182731827218271182701826918268 18267182661826518264182631826218277

Oudeis
01-08-2011, 11:30 PM
I received this postcard this morning, it shows the,then,current royal yacht,carrying Queen Victoria through the lines of warships for the Spithead Naval Regatta. There was no information as to what her name was ,or the year it was taking place in. I searched through my picture library and could not find a vessel that matched her specification,i.e. a 2 masted steam paddle vessel.There were quite a few yachts listed as being royal but not one that had all the attributes shown here. Anyone out there got any ideas?
BrianD

18015

I have come to this question a little late, I know. There is this...

http://www.richard-green.com/Philip-John-Ouless-The-Royal-Yacht-Fairy-with-Queen-Victoria-board-DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=6&tabindex=5&objectid=38776

Perhaps it is the idea of the yacht being the paddle steamer that is wrong? :)

---------- Post added at 10:25 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:22 PM ----------

...this just makes the whole mystery deeper...

http://www.scottishfishingboats.co.uk/models/others/alberta.htm

---------- Post added at 10:30 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:25 PM ----------

...you will all enjoy this article too...

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F30614FE385A16738DDDA10994DD405B 8685F0D3

az_gila
01-09-2011, 07:59 AM
I have come to this question a little late, I know. There is this...

http://www.richard-green.com/Philip-John-Ouless-The-Royal-Yacht-Fairy-with-Queen-Victoria-board-DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=6&tabindex=5&objectid=38776

Perhaps it is the idea of the yacht being the paddle steamer that is wrong? :)

Don't think so - the HMY Fairy is listed as being a tender to the HMY Victoria and Albert (the original one)

Victoria and Albert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMY_Victoria_and_Albert) (1843-1855) - remained in-service as Osbourne (1855-1867)
Fairy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMY_Fairy) (1845-1863) (tender to Victoria and Albert)

From wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Royal_Yachts_of_the_United_Kingdom

The 1842 review (or a year later) still makes sense with no steamships in the fllet...

---------- Post added at 11:59 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:54 PM ----------


...this just makes the whole mystery deeper...

http://www.scottishfishingboats.co.uk/models/others/alberta.htm

Don't think so again...

This picture looks just like the model, and the HMY Victoria and Albert II was in service around the time of the model.

I think the model just got misnamed...:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HMY_Victoria_and_Albert_II_1855_William_Frede rick_Mitchell.jpg

CORRECTION

The Alberta did look the same as the V & A II, and was listed later...

Alberta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMY_Alberta) (1863-1913) (tender to Victoria and Albert (ii))

So the model name is probably correct.

Was the reliability so bad that the Royal Yacht required a tender that was as large as the main yacht as a back-up?

MY MISTAKE again, the size was way smaller than the V & A II, 370 tons vs. 2400 odd tons.

Interesting that they look the same though - perhaps they had one design and just scaled it...:)

brian daley
01-11-2011, 12:31 AM
This is the flagship of the Continental Navy,the precursor to the United States Navy,she is the Bonhomme Richard and was part of a Franco American squadron commanded by the Scotsman John Paul Jones.She was an ex East Indiaman which Jones had converted to a warship carrying 40 guns. They gave the British Navy a hard time and brought the war of Independence to our shores, attacking towns on the West and East coast. In an epic moonlit battle off Flamborough Head,Jones took on the HMS Serapis,44 guns, commanded by Captain Pearson,who also had a smaller warship with him. Calling upon Jones to surrender,Jones allegedly shouted back "I have not yet begun to fight!"and then promptly boarded ,and captured the British ship. The Bonhomme Richard was so badly damaged that she sank the following day. Today ,John Paul Jones is revered as the father of the US Navy,
The painting is oil on canvas and is the work of Geoff Hunt






18289

az_gila
01-11-2011, 07:26 AM
This is the flagship of the Continental Navy,the precursor to the United States Navy,she is the Bonhomme Richard ........
Today ,John Paul Jones is revered as the father of the US Navy,
The painting is oil on canvas and is the work of Geoff Hunt


And the Bonhomme Richard (Bonnie Dick to some of the sailors) name has been re-used a few times since.

The current one is a Amphibious Assault Ship

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/lhd6/Pages/default.aspx

The previous one was a WWII carrier that served until the Vietnam war.

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/lhd6/Pages/history.aspx

This press release about the search for the original is also interesting....

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/lhd6/Pages/NavySearches_JPJ-Ship.aspx


http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/lhd6/PublishingImages/bhrfrigate1.jpg

...still learning stuff...

gregs dad
01-11-2011, 01:03 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/207/465166353_b0321d2b82_z.jpg?zz=1 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/465166353/)

When ships looked like ships and they had their own derricks and hoists to move cargo in stead of dockside cranes

captain kong
01-11-2011, 03:01 PM
Brings back the memories of old in Liverpool in late fifties and early sixties, a Federal Line ship running UK to New Zealand and Australia taking British made exports out and bringing back thousands of tons of frozen lamb and beef and the bow of one of the new Empress liners, Britain or England maybe running over to Montreal Canada with passengers and British made exports and returning with passengers and a cargo of Canadian wheat..
That was when Britain was Great and we had never heard of a stupid EU.

Thanks for the memory, Gregs Dad. I shall go and weep at what we have lost.

brian daley
01-13-2011, 12:09 AM
The Schooner HMS Pickle is not a name that is familiar to most of todays lovers of all things maritime ,but during the Napoleonic wars she had her moment of glory. Pickle was a very fast vessel and on the 26th of October in 1805 she was tasked by Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood to take his despatches relating to the Battle of Trafalgar back to England. They contained the immortal line "The ever to be lamented death of Vice Admiral Lord Viscount Nelson,who ,in the late conflict with the enemy,fell in the hour of victory......" It was the Pickle, and her commander Lieutenant John Lapenotiere ,who brought to England the news of this great victory and the loss of Nelson. Although the Pickle has been lost to popular memory she still lives on the Royal Navy when Warrant Officers have their own celebration on Pickle Night,the 5th of November

captain kong
01-14-2011, 12:08 PM
I have just booked four nights on the old QUEEN MARY in Long Beach, California. A magnificent ship with a great history. I have been on her several times as a hotel ship and a few times in the 50s when she was on the New York run.
The Americans have had her since 1966, near 45 years, The Cunard line had her for 29 years. 1937 to 1966. She is in a magnificent condition and full of nautical history.
Her and her sister, QUEEN ELIZABETH shortened WW2 by 12 months. Each could carry 18,000 troops across the Atlantic in four and a half days.
Here are some views of her. inside and out.

This is what they should have done with the QE2 at the Pier Head, she would have made a fortune for Liverpool.

az_gila
01-14-2011, 06:42 PM
I have just booked four nights on the old QUEEN MARY in Long Beach, California. A magnificent ship with a great history. I have been on her several times as a hotel ship and a few times in the 50s when she was on the New York run.
The Americans have had her since 1966, near 45 years, The Cunard line had her for 29 years. 1937 to 1966. She is in a magnificent condition and full of nautical history.
.....

Captain, check out her condition when you are there.

A while back, when I lived in LA, I stopped going there since I was disgusted at the state Disney had let if fall into.

Even I could see problems at the tourist deck levels - basically rust was just painted over, not removed first - and that was in the areas you could see. Some older reports had it in danger of sinking, but there is only a foot or two under the keel, so no one would get hurt...:)

I think it has changed ownership (or concession - IIRC the city owns it) since then, I would really like to hear your opinion on the physical state of the hull.


Touring it was interesting, you can tie in a lot of Liverpool pub architecture into the style of the QM.

I have also met a lot of WWII US servicemen that travelled on her - I never realized it took 18,000 at a time, quite amazing.

brian daley
01-15-2011, 12:29 AM
One of Britains greatest marine artists was surely Charles Dixon,he did most of his finest works upon the upon the Thames and in the Pool of London in particular. This work dates from 1897 and shows the Anchor Line steamship City of Rome slipping her moorings ,making ready to leave the Pool. Those who have worked on the river,and I count myself lucky to be among their number,will recognise the scene,the smoke and murk add to the scene and evoke an age that is long gone,never to return,
BrianD

18338

captain kong
01-15-2011, 12:55 AM
Hi AZ,
the Mary is now owned by, Delaware North Companies Parks & Resorts, Inc. they took over from the City of Long Beach, they had it for a few years after Disney. I believe Disney just abandoned it and left her in a mess, they were not interested., but Long Beach realy did it up real nice and this new company has had it all refurbished.
I have been staying on it every two years for the last 10 and I have always found her to be in very good condition with improvements every year. I became a member of the Queen Mary Foundation and a few years ago , 2005 I was presented with a portion of her original teak deck inscribed with the 70th anniversary of her launch. There are only four of these pieces in excistence.
in 2007 I helped the Foundation to have an exibition on all the Masters of the QM while she was with Cunard, I did the Bios of them including Photos. and they were enlarged and shown on the after Exibition Hall.
B Deck Square which used to be the sailors Pig and Whistle and surrounded by cabins, where the foremast come down with the entrance to the mast for the crows nest, has been removed and is now a large exibition of WW2 when she was trooping. very interesting.
I do enjoy going aboard her. I get the feel of the old days when we sailed the ships.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2010 17:34:08 -0500
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From: dncdestinations@dncinc.com
Subject: Experience Royal Treatment Aboard The Queen Mary Starting at $95


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The new photos did not come out..

az_gila
01-15-2011, 09:25 AM
Thanks Captain... I guess I was really put off from my visit during the Disney era.

I'm glad it's now in much better condition and a good example of fine shipbuilding. It is pretty impressive when you just walk up to the side.

Now I've left Los Angeles, I'll think about staying there on my next visit...:)

Heck, $95 a night is a bargain in LA.

brian daley
01-15-2011, 10:30 PM
Most of us know about the mutiny on the Bounty in 1789, it was a very civilised affair when compared with Hermione mutiny in 1797;and Captain Bligh can be called a paragon of virtue when compared to the Hermione's monstrous Captain Pigot. Under his command Hermione became a hell ship and things came to a head in September 1797 in the Caribbean. Pigots brutish behaviour had caused the deaths of three sailors on the 20th ,and on the 21st he had 12 men flogged. That night the crew rebelled and slaughtered all but one of the officers,throwing them overboard and feeding them to the sharks. They then sailed the ship500 miles to La Guaira ,in Venzuela and surrended to the Spaniards. The Spaniards renamed her Santa Cecilia and two years later the HMS Surprise ,commanded by Captain Edward Hamilton recaptured her Puerto Cabello,and action for which he was knighted. 33 mutineers were eventually captured and tried and 24 of those were hanged. More than 100 mutineers were never found.
This painting is another wonderful study of oils on canvas by Geoff Hunt,
BrianD


18367

az_gila
01-15-2011, 11:40 PM
Nice painting...:)

captain kong
01-16-2011, 05:25 PM
These are photos of Canadian Pacifics Duchess of Bedford then after WW2 was renamed Empress of France. A popular ship in Liverpool doing 17 day trips to Montreal and back. In winter when the St Laurence River was frozen she went to St JOHN, New Brunswick.
Built as the Duchess of Bedford in 1920, she was scrapped in 1960
I sailed on her several times. Very handy for doing shopping trips on her to buy good Canadian gear in Montreal.
Empress of France and a photo I took from the Crows Nest when she was doing somersaults in the North Atlantic winter. Duchess of Bedford as built and as a Troop ship in WW2, She was the most bombed ship to survive WW2

18376183771837818379

gregs dad
01-16-2011, 07:40 PM
Hi C K good site for ship pics

http://philipparker500.fotopic.net/

brian daley
01-17-2011, 12:00 AM
This is a fine study of of an unamed frigate heading down the Mersey for the open sea.It was executed in the late 18th ,or early19th century by the, then, famous marine artist Robert Salmon. He was born in Whitehaven in 1775 and spent his early days learning his art in Whitehaven and Greenock, He moved to Liverpool ,where he spent much time painting the river traffic and became famous for his marine art. In 1828 he pulled up stakes and moved to America where spent at least 15 years practising his art on the Hudson and other great seaports on the east coast and is believed to have died about 1851. If you have an original,get it insured,it is now highly collectable,
BrianD




18380

Oudeis
01-17-2011, 12:42 AM
I take it then that this frigate is of 50 or more tons gross tonnage? :)

[http://www.fotw.net/flags/gb-ensr.html#red]

brian daley
01-17-2011, 11:35 AM
Hi Oudeis,
the dictionary definition of a frigate,is as shown below.I take it that the reason for your question was the 50 ton minimum weight requirement,well frigates weighed well above that limit.A modern frigate is between four and five thousand tons ,back then it was more like two or three hundred tons .
"During the 18th and early 19th centuries, a frigate was a sailing vessel designed for speed, with a flush gun deck carrying 24 to 44 guns, used as a commerce raider and for blockade duty. When warships were made of wood and had sails, frigates were small, fast, long range, lightly armed (single gun-deck) ships used for scouting and carrying dispatches"

BrianD

Oudeis
01-17-2011, 12:14 PM
Actually I took the trouble to look up the use of the Red Duster (see web-site link above) and noted that it was to be used by ships of that tonnage and above. I'm learning as I go, a little at a time.

captain kong
01-17-2011, 11:04 PM
HERE IS A PHOTO OF THE Esso Aberdeen 125,000 TONS. I was 2nd Mate on her running to the Brent Spa loading tower 150 miles North of Shetlands. A wild and lonely place. The highest wind speed recorded there was 220 miles an hour.
The Spa was a hollow tube 600 feet tall with a control room and helipad on top.
It was filled with crude oil from the production rigs , five of then, in the Brent Field.
We loaded over the bow
The Spa was scrapped about five years ago

captain kong
01-20-2011, 01:49 PM
Here is a photo of the SS Bantria, owned by Cunard Line.
She was used on the Mediterranean run from Liverpool.
"Bantria built 1928, cargo, 1954 she was sold to Costa Line, of Genoa renamed
`Giorgina Celli`. 2,402 tons

In the early 50s it was rumoured that some one had killed the Cook and then thrown overboard. then the next trip someone killed the Cook and then thrown overboard , then the next trip someone killed the Cook and was thrown overboard.
No one was caught over this. So who did it.???? Or was it a myth??? does anyone know the Real Story???

Photo by Frank Hughes

Samsette
01-20-2011, 07:03 PM
She musta bin a poor feeder.:)

But what a fine looking example of that era, architecturally speaking.

captain kong
01-20-2011, 08:51 PM
In the early 50s I did hear a rumour that the Chippy did it but there has been no confirmation on this.

I have just found this letter to the MNA from our old friend Reg from Norfolk Island, South Pacific.
I wonder if he got his answer, must call him.

Full Name: bangorreg
Home Town?: Norfolk Island
Message Text: Looking for any information about Fred Mather, married and father of children when he signed up as a cook on board the Bantria, which set sail 23.12.1946. from Liverpool for the Mediterranean.Fred was the 3rd cook,his two predecessors disappeared overboard on similar trips,I wonder what the fate of Fred was??.
Reg
Thanks for that Reg, any news?? that confirms that something did happen.

brian daley
01-20-2011, 10:15 PM
HMS Agamemnon
This was a third rate battleship of the line which was built at Bucklers Hard on the Beaulieu River in 1795. Nelson once referred to her as his favourite ship.
She fought in many battles during the Napoleonic Wars, seeing action in the Battle of the Saintes in 1782 ;Toulon in1792;; Hothams action in 1795,the Nore Mutiny in 1797; Copenhagen in1801; Calders action of 1805;and the Battle of Trafalgar.
Nelson was appointed to command her in 1793 and it was in her that he rose from obscurity to national renown. She was damaged when she ran aground in Maldonado Bay ,Uruguay in 1809 and was thought too worn out to be worth saving.
This is another fine study in oils on canvas by Geoff Hunt,
BrianD






18399

brian daley
01-21-2011, 04:20 PM
Constitution

This is Americas most famous ship, built in the closing years of the 18th century, she was commissioned in 1798 as one three super frigates.
Carrying 44 guns ,she was larger than European frigates of the same rate.
She was a decade old before she saw action against the British in the war of 1812. She earned the nickname “Old Ironsides” when British gunners noted that their cannonballs seemed to bounce off her hull. She captured 4 British ships in total;the Guirriere and Java in 1812 ,and the Cyane and Levant in 1815.. she became a training ship for the US Naval Academy in the American Civil War and became a museum in later years. She is still afloat today and sailed under her own canvas in 1997. Once in every year she is turned around at her moorings; a living legend,
BrianD18405

Another gem from Geoff Hunt

az_gila
01-21-2011, 05:54 PM
Constitution

.... Once in every year she is turned around at her moorings; a living legend,
BrianD
Another gem from Geoff Hunt

The USS Constitution is in Boston Harbour...

http://www.history.navy.mil/ussconstitution/

...and the Geoff hunt painting are wonderful... please post more...:PDT_Aliboronz_24:

brian daley
01-22-2011, 12:31 AM
Hi Az, this one is for you, we are still in the Napoleonic era and we are looking at a Portugese First Rate ship of the line,the Principe Real,arriving in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is March the 7th 1808 and the Portugese royal family ,the Braganzas,are fleeing from Napoleon. The British Royal Navy provided three battleships as escorts for this journey and we can see HMS Marlborough firing a salute as the Portugese monarch is carried by his pinnace to the welcoming shore.
This is another great work by Geoff Hunt,
BrianD








18413

captain kong
01-22-2011, 02:35 PM
this is the Union Castle Line ship. DUNBAR CASTLE, UK to South Africa run.
She was mined in the Thames estuary and sunk in WW2
On January 9th 1940 outward bound from London to Beira in Mozambique with 150 or so crew and passengers on board, she hit a mine 7 miles off Ramsgate, killing nine crew and one passenger.

Oudeis
01-22-2011, 02:46 PM
Here is a photo of the SS Bantria, owned by Cunard Line.
She was used on the Mediterranean run from Liverpool.
"Bantria built 1928, cargo, 1954 she was sold to Costa Line, of Genoa renamed
`Giorgina Celli`. 2,402 tons

In the early 50s it was rumoured that some one had killed the Cook and then thrown overboard. then the next trip someone killed the Cook and then thrown overboard , then the next trip someone killed the Cook and was thrown overboard.
No one was caught over this. So who did it.???? Or was it a myth??? does anyone know the Real Story???

Photo by Frank Hughes

I am trying to find more news on this, but in the meantime this may interest you all. Skip to the bottom for mention of Liverpool. This may kick-start interest in the rest...

http://www.derbysulzers.com/shipfelix.html

captain kong
01-22-2011, 04:03 PM
Oudeis, What a story, unbelievable voyage, what a brave lot of men and a brave ship.
I saw the ship in the early 50s and never realised what she was about. thanks for the story.
Captain William Carruthers, Taught me Navigation, ship Stability, construction and many other subjects at Fleetwood Nautical College from 1975 for Mates through to 1980 for Masters. An excellent tutor, again I never knew about his career until now, he never spoke about the war, I believe he died not too long ago. I think he lived in the Glasson Dock area near to Lancaster. A gentleman and a Seaman in the true sense. He died just over a year ago, aged around 95.

captain kong
01-23-2011, 03:38 PM
Here is a photo ofthe SS HATASU, one of Moss Hutchinson`s Steamers built in 1921.
She was torpedoed in the Atlantic 600 miles east of Cape Race, on a voyage from Manchester to New York
A lad form two streets away from me, Billy Dempster, who was only 15 years old was killed including 40 in total.

Hatasu SS was a British Cargo Steamer of 3,198 tons built in 1921. On the 2nd October 1941 when on route from MANCHESTER for NEW YORK in ballast she was torpedoed by German submarine U-431 and sunk 600 miles E. CAPE RACE. 40 crew lost from a total of 47.

Oudeis
01-23-2011, 05:15 PM
I found this by accident...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/categories/c1174/

[our old friend the Laconia is mentioned on the first page/list]

brian daley
01-23-2011, 08:08 PM
Oudeis,
What an absolutely fascinating link, a soul could spend a lifetime browsing that site,thank you for sharing it with us,
BrianD

brian daley
01-24-2011, 12:04 AM
The Minotaur
The Minotaur was a third rate ship of the line and saw a lot of action in the Napoleonic war.
JMW Turner began work on this painting five years before she was lost;the painting was well advanced before his original intention to depict a ransport changed to reflect national interest in Minotaurs loss.
Turner manages to depict the full fury of the elements as the gale force wind turns the sea into swirling maelstrom,toltally wrecking the ship as she was run aground on the Haak Sands on the River Texel. Approximately 60 men managed to get away to safety in in two of the ships surviving boats ,sadly more than a hundred and twenty poor souls were drowned when the sinking ship capsized. She was a .veteran of the battles of the Nile,Trafalgar and Copenhagen. This is a painting to be studied to appreciate the dreadful scene,
BrianD



18427

brian daley
01-25-2011, 04:55 PM
This is a painting that has haunted me for most of my life,I first saw it when I was in the Junior school at Tiber Street in the 40's. Since then I have come across it in magazines and books ,and about ten years ago I read the story of it. The artist was Theodore Gericault and he spent three years creating this masterpiece and the story of this disaster near destroyed the French government. The Medusa was on route to Senegal ,captained by a man who had been ashore for 25 years. He had been given command for political reasons and proved to be incompetent. He ran her on to the Arguin Bank off the coast of Mauretania. The captain had ignored his own officers and gave a favoured passenger the job of navigating her. When she ran aground, the captain and some vip passengers took the boats and forced the rest of the crew, at gunpoint to share a poorly provisioned raft. 148 souls were on that raft,standing room only. She was towed by the boats but was callously abandoned when the weather worsened. They were without food ,water or navigational and aids and things very quickly deteriorated. Cannibalism,suicide and murder winnowed the 148 down to just 15 when they were picked up by the ship Argus 13 days later.








18446

Oudeis
01-25-2011, 10:21 PM
I think I am right in saying that the cannibalism did not begin until a few short hours before the rescue, sadly.

I saw a programme on the beeb some years ago by Andrew Graham Dixon about the painting, wonderful and informative. AGD used to do a piece on this painting and that every Sunday in the Telegraph, all wonderful stuff.
[I will try to get a hold of somewhere the programme can be seen online]

BTW.
The painting is 16' by 23'.

---------- Post added at 09:21 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:10 PM ----------

His (A G-Ds) article on the painting/artist etc

http://www.andrewgrahamdixon.com/archive/readArticle/950

brian daley
01-27-2011, 12:15 AM
Broached To

This is one of the worst dangers that can ever threaten a sailing ship. In this painting by Charles Pears ,R.O.I., the ship has been running heavily before the westerly gales in the Roaring Forties. She has broached-to and is in danger of being overwhelmed by the seas, which are now broadside on. The vessel lies helplessly in the trough of the seas, The squaresails are end-on to the wind and the rudder is useless because the ship has lost way. The fore top-mast staysail is the main hope of getting off before the wind again. The other sails will probably shake themselves to pieces before the yards can be braced up, even if the masts do not go overboard. This desperate situation has been the cause of many a well found-vessel having been posted as missing,
BrianD
18464

Oudeis
01-27-2011, 01:41 AM
You seamen you just cant win...

Day after day, day after day,
We stuck, nor breath nor motion;
As idle as a painted ship
Upon a painted ocean.

From,'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'...

http://www.online-literature.com/coleridge/646/

brian daley
01-28-2011, 12:03 AM
The Temeraire

This is a study by Joseph M W Turner,arguably Britains greatest impressionist. He shows the Second Rate warship Temeraire being towed by a steam paddle tug which is hauling her to her last port of call,Beatsons yard at Rotherhithe where she will be broken up.
She was one of the Dreadnought class and was built in 1788,she was heavily armed ,constructed largely of oak and was copper bottomed. The Temeraire was part of the Wooden Walls of England and was the largest of her class. She served the Royal Navy with distinction for close on 50 years and Turner painted this showing the passing of an age,the tug representing the new age of steam. This painting was voted Britains favourite in a poll conducted by BBC Radio 4 in 2005,
BrianD
18469
Since I posted the picture ,one of the lads on th Sailors Home posted this old poem by Sir Henry Newbolt. It is a truly apt piece poetry,

The Fighting Temeraire

It was eight bells ringing,
For the morning watch was done,
And the gunner's lads were singing
As they polished every gun.
It was eight bells ringing,
And the gunner's lads were singing,
For the ship she rode a-swinging,
As they polished every gun.

Oh! to see the linstock lighting,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Oh! to hear the round shot biting,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Oh! to see the linstock lighting,
And to hear the round shot biting,
For we're all in love with fighting
On the fighting Téméraire.

It was noontide ringing,
And the battle just begun,
When the ship her way was winging,
As they loaded every gun.
It was noontide ringing,
When the ship her way was winging,
And the gunner's lads were singing
As they loaded every gun.

There'll be many grim and gory,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
There'll be few to tell the story,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
There'll be many grim and gory,
There'll be few to tell the story,
But we'll all be one in glory
With the Fighting Téméraire.

There's a far bell ringing
At the setting of the sun,
And a phantom voice is singing
Of the great days done.
There's a far bell ringing,
And a phantom voice is singing
Of renown for ever clinging
To the great days done.

Now the sunset breezes shiver,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
And she's fading down the river,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Now the sunset's breezes shiver,
And she's fading down the river,
But in England's song for ever
She's the Fighting Téméraire.

Sir Henry Newbolt

brian daley
01-28-2011, 11:54 PM
The name Anson is famed in British history, he, more than any other individual ,helped Britain take her rightful place in the world as a major sea power. This painting by Samuel Scott ,shows the incident that catapulted him, and the Navy,into becoming an icon for a nation that viewed itself as the new Rome. In 1740 Commander George Anson took a squadron of battleships around the world ,the Centurion a 60 gun Fourth Rate ship of the line was his flagship. They were away for four years and during that time Anson lost the rest of his ships,most of his men and all of his teeth to the dreaded scurvey. In the June of 1743 he came across the ultimate prize,the Manila galleon Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. After a hard won battle,the Spaniard lowered her colours and Anson won a prize that made him, and Britain,very rich. The Spanish gold saved a beleagured Britain and funded the war and thus paved the way for the destruction of Spanish power in the Pacific. Centurions final battle was for the capture of Havana in1762,she sailed on until 1769 ,when she was sent to the breakers yard.
BrianD
18475

captain kong
01-29-2011, 10:15 PM
The Temeraire

This is a study by Joseph M W Turner,arguably Britains greatest impressionist. He shows the Second Rate warship Temeraire being towed by a steam paddle tug which is hauling her to her last port of call,Beatsons yard at Rotherhithe where she will be broken up.
She was one of the Dreadnought class and was built in 1788,she was heavily armed ,constructed largely of oak and was copper bottomed. The Temeraire was part of the Wooden Walls of England and was the largest of her class. She served the Royal Navy with distinction for close on 50 years and Turner painted this showing the passing of an age,the tug representing the new age of steam. This painting was voted Britains favourite in a poll conducted by BBC Radio 4 in 2005,
BrianD
18469
Since I posted the picture ,one of the lads on th Sailors Home posted this old poem by Sir Henry Newbolt. It is a truly apt piece poetry,

The Fighting Temeraire

It was eight bells ringing,
For the morning watch was done,
And the gunner's lads were singing
As they polished every gun.
It was eight bells ringing,
And the gunner's lads were singing,
For the ship she rode a-swinging,
As they polished every gun.

Oh! to see the linstock lighting,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Oh! to hear the round shot biting,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Oh! to see the linstock lighting,
And to hear the round shot biting,
For we're all in love with fighting
On the fighting Téméraire.

It was noontide ringing,
And the battle just begun,
When the ship her way was winging,
As they loaded every gun.
It was noontide ringing,
When the ship her way was winging,
And the gunner's lads were singing
As they loaded every gun.

There'll be many grim and gory,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
There'll be few to tell the story,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
There'll be many grim and gory,
There'll be few to tell the story,
But we'll all be one in glory
With the Fighting Téméraire.

There's a far bell ringing
At the setting of the sun,
And a phantom voice is singing
Of the great days done.
There's a far bell ringing,
And a phantom voice is singing
Of renown for ever clinging
To the great days done.

Now the sunset breezes shiver,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
And she's fading down the river,
Téméraire! Téméraire!
Now the sunset's breezes shiver,
And she's fading down the river,
But in England's song for ever
She's the Fighting Téméraire.

Sir Henry Newbolt

I have a large framed print of the TEMERAIRE, EXCELLENT PAINTING.

---------- Post added at 09:15 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:12 PM ----------






The name Anson is famed in British history, he, more than any other individual ,helped Britain take her rightful place in the world as a major sea power. This painting by Samuel Scott ,shows the incident that catapulted him, and the Navy,into becoming an icon for a nation that viewed itself as the new Rome. In 1740 Commander George Anson took a squadron of battleships around the world ,the Centurion a 60 gun Fourth Rate ship of the line was his flagship. They were away for four years and during that time Anson lost the rest of his ships,most of his men and all of his teeth to the dreaded scurvey. In the June of 1743 he came across the ultimate prize,the Manila galleon Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. After a hard won battle,the Spaniard lowered her colours and Anson won a prize that made him, and Britain,very rich. The Spanish gold saved a beleagured Britain and funded the war and thus paved the way for the destruction of Spanish power in the Pacific. Centurions final battle was for the capture of Havana in1762,she sailed on until 1769 ,when she was sent to the breakers yard.
BrianD
18475

They named a Battleship after him in 1941, HMS ANSON, a KING GEORGE V class 35,000 ton, ten 14 inch guns. scrapped in 1948

az_gila
01-30-2011, 12:06 AM
They named a Battleship after him in 1941, HMS ANSON, a KING GEORGE V class 35,000 ton, ten 14 inch guns. scrapped in 1948

..and a just pre-WWII aeroplane...

http://www.freefoto.com/images/20/22/20_22_25---The-only-flying-example-of-an-Avro-Anson-in-the-world--RAF-Leuchars-Airshow_web.jpg?&k=The+only+flying+example+of+an+Avro+Anson+in+the+ world%2C+RAF+Leuchars+Airshow

brian daley
01-31-2011, 11:26 PM
Kenneth D.Shoesmith
A while ago I was contacted by an author who had seen a poster that I had posted on this site. It was by the maritime artist Kenneth .D. Shoesmith and the study was of the P&O Hospital Ship Egypt at Alexandria in 1918. The author, Glyn L.Evans wrote and asked me if he could include in book that he was completing about Kenneth Shoesmith. The picture was in the public domain so Glyn was free to use it anyway,but I did ask him if I could have a copy of the book when it was published. I received my copy a few days ago and can honestly write that it is the finest book on maritime art that I have ever owned. Glyn is a master of his subject and writes informatively with a touch of humour. The artwork is wonderful and the paintings and posters are so vivd and lively. This is a must for those who love the sea and ships. It is available from Silver Link Publishing and costs just £30-00p including packaging and posting. If you require further details PM me and I will pass the address on to you,
BrianD
18485

Oudeis
02-01-2011, 10:34 AM
Brian, why so coy?

This is page two of part of their book list, the page with this particular book on it...

http://www.transportdiversions.com/catalog.asp?publisherid=154&&totalrecs=44&thispage=2

brian daley
02-01-2011, 01:29 PM
Hi Oudeis,
I was'nt being coy,Glyn wrote to me and enclosed a post card which was illustrated with the picture I posted. He informed that the book was on sale(this was 3 weeks ago) and I sent my money and received it last week. I have an enormous collection of marine prints and this book is so good that I thought lots of people who look at this site might wish to buy it for themselves. I was totally unaware of the sales catalogue,I dealt directly with the author. Coy? Hmmmm.
BrianD

Oudeis
02-01-2011, 01:35 PM
I did not mean it to be disparaging Brian.

There are lots of titles there of interest to quite a few who visit Yo!. I only seek to help. :)

[little wonder you are such a fount of tales as you deal habitually with the main actors.]

brian daley
02-02-2011, 12:22 AM
The Upper Pool
This is a work by another maritime artist who painted chiefly tidal Thames and coastal views. Frederick Atmore Winkfield (1842-1917 ),came from Manchester and moved to Fulham in 1877 and lived there for most of his life. He painted in both oils and watercolours and exhibited 21 pictures at the Royal Academy between 1873 and 1909. Here in”The Upper Pool” Winkfield has painted a telling picture of the gradual transitionfrom sail to steam at the end of the 19th century. He seems all but forgotten now and this study shows what a fine talent he had,
BrianD

18500

captain kong
02-02-2011, 04:21 PM
This a photo of Fidel Castro`s yacht Granma`
Granma is the yacht that was used to transport the fighters of the Cuban Revolution from Mexico to Cuba in 1956 for the purpose of overthrowing the regime of Fulgencio Batista. The 60-foot (18 m) diesel-powered cabin cruiser was built in 1943 and designed to accommodate 12 people. It is said to have been named for the original owner's grandmother.[1]

It is now on display in the museum of hero`s in Havana

gregs dad
02-02-2011, 06:44 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4095/5410426233_dc95e140d6_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/5410426233/)
Empress of Britain in Liverpool docks in the 1960s from one of my slides

captain kong
02-02-2011, 07:07 PM
Thanks for that Gregs Dad, I sailed on the Britain in 1961.
Cheers

gregs dad
02-02-2011, 07:27 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/167/443799912_58e189613b_z.jpg?zz=1 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/443799912/)
This is around that time KK here she is in the old Gladstone graving dock

brian daley
02-02-2011, 08:49 PM
Hi Joe,
The Empress of Britain was the only ship I got sacked off. We were anchored in the river opposite the Pier Head awaiting to come alongside. I had just been diagnosed as having laryngitis and the doctor signed me off and sent me ashore in a launch,they were afraid of me infecting the passengers. Got good reports (2 VG's) but it was the only time in my life that I'd been given the bullet,
BrianD

brian daley
02-02-2011, 09:07 PM
The poetry below .accompanies the picture of the ships passing in the night

18520


This is from a Royal Mail Line calendar, the picture opposite the title page, entitled 'NOCHE TROPICAL'. Cruzando la linea ecuatorial de calma perpetua', prompted me to write the first line of the following poem and, after a little deliberation, the next three lines just seemed to follow. Pleased with my effort, I sent it off to maritime poet cousin, Barrie, who promptly responded with the second verse. In no time at all, alternate verses were exchanged until Barrie realised he was at his place of employment, so a halt was called. Just as well, really, as it was beginning to look like a collaboration between Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and John Maselfield disguised as two grumpy old men. Nevertheless, I have no doubt the sentiments expressed in the last two verses will be echoed by many readers.
Poetry lovers will know that H. W. Longfellow wrote:

'Ships that pass in the night, and speak one another in passing,
Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness;
So on the ocean of life, we pass and speak one another,
Only a look and a voice, then darkness again and silence.'


Ships that pass in the night

The stars at night give guidance to the deep-sea navigator,
Their constancy more trusty than a modern calculator.
Whilst radar gives the bridge a view of what may cause collision,
Old salts would rather put their trust in a constant look-out's vision.

Constant may the look-out be - though sometimes maybe not!
Awake and sober, wonderful- if following the plot.
Throughout the blackness of a night with stars in countless number,
Human nature and the warmth cry out for peaceful slumber.

The radar is not faultless, it's sometimes on the blink.
The mariner upon the bridge is then required to think.
The radar or the look-out man? Vigilance or sloth?
The proper thing in any ship is vigilance in both!

The economic climate is so often held to blame
For lack of proper manning, which really is a shame.
Now navigators, poorly trained on currents like the Swellies
Are in their cabins down below, with football on their tellies.

In days of yore the sailing ship (a frigate or a sloop)
Had look-outs posted day and night in crow's nest, bow and poop.
How times have changed (not for the best). Regard the modern freighter,
No look-out but, what's even worse, no wireless operator!

The question asked by old sea salts is 'What's become of funnels?'
As much a part of steam ships as rowing boats have gunwales.
Why arc they built so ugly now? Where dignity? Where style?
What is there in a diesel vent to capture or beguile?

Thank goodness, then, for Shoesmith, who captured all the grace
When ships were ships and men were men, and funnels had their place.
Recorded now in picture form, with thanks to Shoesmith's skill,
By such exquisite artistry may grace be with us still.
Glyn L. Evans

captain kong
02-03-2011, 06:38 PM
Here is the last photo of the USN Submarine TRIGGER,

This poem was written by a crew member who was lost with all hands on her next patrol,

I'M THE GALLOPING GHOST OF THE JAPANESE COAST
You don't hear of me and my crew.
But just ask any man off the coast of Japan
If he knows of the Trigger Maru.

I look sleek and slender alongside my tender
With others like me at my side,
But we'll tell you a story of battle and glory,
As enemy waters we ride.

I've been stuck on a rock, felt the depth charge's shock,
Been north to a place called Attu,
and I've sunk me two freighters atop the equator
Hot work, but the sea was cold blue.

I've cruised close inshore and carried the war
to the Empire Island Honshu,
While they wire Yokahama I could see Fujiyama,
So I stayed, to admire the view.

When we rigged to run silently, deeply I dived,
And within me the heat was terrific.
My men pouring sweat, silent and yet
Cursed me and the whole ****ed Pacific.

Then destroyers came sounding and depth charges pounding
My submarine crew took the test.
For in that far off land there are no friends on hand,
To answer a call of distress.

I was blasted and shaken (some damage I've taken),
my hull bleeds and pipe lines do, too
I've come in from out there for machinery repair,
And a rest for me and my crew.

I got by on cool nerve and in silence I served,
Though I took some hard knocks in return,
One propeller shaft sprung and my battery's done,
But the enemy ships I saw burn.

I'm the galloping ghost of the Japanese coast,
You don't hear of me and my crew.
But just ask any man off the coast of Japan,
If he knows of the Trigger Maru.

USS Trigger was lost with all hands during her twelfth patrol, on March 26, 1945.

Oudeis
02-03-2011, 08:41 PM
(kind of) BTW.
I am still poking about looking for the art documentary on the Raft of the Medusa, so far no luck, but I have found this place...

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/

brian daley
02-04-2011, 12:41 AM
This is another poster from the Kenneth D. Shoesmith collection,Glyn Evans made the right choice to include this one.It shows the Royal Mail Steamer at anchor in Carlisle Bay, Barbados. The passengers have gone ashore and the bum boat men are trying to sell their souvenirs to those still on board.
As a seafarer ,I find it has all the ingredients for making me want to go back to sea,sun, exotic ports and that blue ,blue sea.I used to watch ships like this when I was a kid in the 40's and 50's. They would anchor mid river awaiting a berth on the landing stage and I would imagine where they had been and where they might go next. I can almost hear the sounds of a calypso wafting from the shore,
BrianD
18550

Oudeis
02-04-2011, 01:17 AM
[Brian, not that I have had any luck, but your inbox is full. :)]

brian daley
02-04-2011, 10:58 AM
Hi Tom,
I've just emptied it !
BrianD

NhocCuteGirlUK
02-04-2011, 11:00 AM
Nice pictures Brian!


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brian daley
02-04-2011, 09:03 PM
I was clearing the cupboard on our bureau and came across a stack of comics from the 80's and early 90's;there was one,a first edition ,called Talking Turkey (was there ever a 2nd edition?) I sat and read it and came across this strip,see what you think,I thought it was way out!
BrianD

1857018571

brian daley
02-04-2011, 09:51 PM
This is the barque Birkdale,she was built in 1892 and spent nearly all her working in the Chilean nitrate trade. In April 1920,the marine artist John Everett sailed on her as third mate. During the ships voyage Everett painted many innovative pictures,this being one of them,but sold very few. He died in 1949 and left over a 1000 paintings and more than 2000 prints,which he beqeathed to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. This study was painted from the bowsprit looking aft.
The Birkdale was wrecked on the Chilean coast after catching fire in 1927
BrianD18572

Oudeis
02-05-2011, 10:00 PM
There are ships and there are ships. Just watched a programme on 'waves' and learned of this odd craft...

http://www.ship-technology.com/projects/flip-ship/

wsteve55
02-06-2011, 12:22 AM
Braved the weather,and took some pic's on a deserted riverside! Seemed appropriate weather, for the last visit of H.M.S. Manchester,as it was "chuckin' it down"!! :smirk::snf (41): (The angle on these is a bit limited,as they wouldn't let me go any closer!)

brian daley
02-06-2011, 12:45 AM
This is the Glengyle ,built in Dundee for Glen Line in 1939. She had a very busy war being requisitioned by the Admiralty at the outbreak of war;she was converted to a fast supply ship and flew the White Ensign. In April 1940 she was converted to an LSI L ,a Landing Ship Infantry (Large). This made her capable of carrying 700 troop's and 22 landing craft, she was fitted with a Naval bridge and 4 six inch guns. The Glengyle served in the Mediterranean and Far East,and took part in the Malta Convoys, the Allied invasion of French North Africa,was present at the invasion of Sicily and served as Montgomery's head quarters. This painting was by Arthur Burgess ,an Australian artist, and the study is entitled The Brotherhood of Seamen,showing the rescue of some fishermen whose vessel was in danger of being swamped by the heavy seas,
18594
BrianD

wsteve55
02-06-2011, 01:45 AM
Just wondered if anyone knows when H.M.S. Liverpool is to visit,again? She's another type 42,due to be de-commisioned.

Oudeis
02-06-2011, 01:57 AM
They are out doing their bit in the terrible sunshine...

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/surface-fleet/type-42-destroyers/hms-liverpool/news/index.htm

wsteve55
02-06-2011, 02:10 AM
They are out doing their bit in the terrible sunshine...

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operations-and-support/surface-fleet/type-42-destroyers/hms-liverpool/news/index.htm

Thanks for that tom! :cha (41):

captain kong
02-06-2011, 10:58 AM
This is the Glengyle ,built in Dundee for Glen Line in 1939. She had a very busy war being requisitioned by the Admiralty at the outbreak of war;she was converted to a fast supply ship and flew the White Ensign. In April 1940 she was converted to an LSI L ,a Landing Ship Infantry (Large). This made her capable of carrying 700 troop's and 22 landing craft, she was fitted with a Naval bridge and 4 six inch guns. The Glengyle served in the Mediterranean and Far East,and took part in the Malta Convoys, the Allied invasion of French North Africa,was present at the invasion of Sicily and served as Montgomery's head quarters. This painting was by Arthur Burgess ,an Australian artist, and the study is entitled The Brotherhood of Seamen,showing the rescue of some fishermen whose vessel was in danger of being swamped by the heavy seas,
18594
BrianD

The Glengyle was the only ship to have a Brewery on board.

Jenny
02-06-2011, 07:55 PM
Just been on board the HMS Manchester. I was a little disappointed that we were not allowed down into the control rooms or the mess.
Otherwise it was a very cold but enjoyable day

captain kong
02-06-2011, 09:29 PM
Hi Jenny,
Where is she tied up.?
and how long would she be there.?
I was thinking of taking the grandson.

az_gila
02-06-2011, 10:13 PM
Hi Jenny,
Where is she tied up.?
and how long would she be there.?
I was thinking of taking the grandson.

Sorry...too late. It was open to the public from 12 to 5 today (Sunday) She sails on Tuesday for Portsmouth for the de-commisioning next week.

18603


She was at the cruise ship/car ferry terminal.

It was interesting, but as said, a disappointment only the deck was open.

The anti-aircraft business end -

18604

And some interesting equipment designed and made in Tucson...:)

18605

It was cold and very windy, with a high tide. The choppy Mersey -

18606

It was well worth the visit.

brian daley
02-07-2011, 12:54 AM
This is the First Rate French steam battleship Bretagne,built at Brest between 1853 and 1856. She was the Flagship of Napoleon 111 and was part of his attempt to challenge British naval mastery. She was a 6000-ton three decker and symbolised the schizophrenic international policy of the 2nd Empire,at once seeking to work with Britain while undermining her global power to secure a dominant role in the partnership. In August 1858, as the flagship of an ill advised attempt to improve Anglo French relations, Louis Napolean invited Queen Victoria to visit Cherbourg,ostensibly to celebrate the opening of the new railway line linking the port with Paris.The new railway meant French troops could sent from Paris to Cherbourg in a matter of hours.Victoria returned from her French trip deeply alarmed by the French base and the naval build up and demanded that her ministers do more to maintain naval dominance. Shortly afterwards orders were given for the construction of HMS Warrior,bringing both the French naval challenge and the age of ships like Bretagne to a speedy end.
BrianD






18614

brian daley
02-07-2011, 11:33 PM
This is the Bibby cargo liner Cardiganshire ,painted by Shoesmith in 1917.She is lying at anchor in Yokohama in Japan, busy loading cargo from the lighters alongside her. It is a very stylised painting ,the lighters at the bottom of the study lead us into the picture showing us the stern and starboard side where we can see the slings of cargo being hauled aboard.If you look closely at the trunks and boxes on the lighters you will see the names of some the ports where the cargo is bound for. Mount Fujiyama lies on the horizon giving the viewer an unmistakable identity of where the vessel is,
BrianD

18648

brian daley
02-09-2011, 02:08 AM
This study was by a marine artist from Sunderland called Charles John de Lacy. He trained in London and became an illustrator for The Graphic and The London Illustrated News,which from 1895, employed him as a press artist and special correspondent.Most of his pictures concern The Pool and the area around Limehouse and Greenwich Reach. The Port of London Authority engaged him as their official artist and de Lacy turned out many paintings ,both large and small which were used for postcards , posters and prints.He died in 1929 at the age of 73,
BrianD
18678

brian daley
02-11-2011, 09:57 PM
The Dudhope was the last sailing ship to be commisioned for Barrie & Nairn before the company turned exclusively to steam.She was launched on the 7th of August 1893,at 3,300 tons deadweight,Dudhope was a smaller full rigger than the others in the fleet. Her final voyage for B&N ended at Rotterdam in August 1905 ,where she was sold to a Liverpool shipper T.Shute for £9000.00. Shute's retained her until she was captured by U49 on the 15th of July 1917 and sunk with explosive charges . Two months later the U49 was sunk by a British merchantman,who rammed her,
BrianD

Pictures and text supplied by David Barrie, Dec. 2010






18820

brian daley
02-15-2011, 11:42 PM
At the beginning of the First World War,many British passenger liners were requisitioned by the Royal Navy for conversion to armed merchant cruisers(AMC's). Many vessels had been designed and built in the years leading up to 1914 with this specific role in mind. Decks were strengthened for heavy gunsand accommodation could be easily adapted to naval or troop carrying requirements . The 10th Cruiser Squadron had many such vessels amongst its number and the Royal Navy was able to release 20 regular RN cruisers for other important duties. In this painting by Kenneth Shoesmith we see five AMC's of the Royal Mail Steam Packet company ,painted in Admiralty grey,ploughing through the North Sea in Line abreast. They are Andes, Alcantara,Ebro, Almanzara and Arlanza. The artist used a lot of artistic licence for the ships were never put in such a line up in reality.
My thanks to Glyn L.Evans for allowing this item,
BrianD18849

captain kong
02-17-2011, 06:22 PM
Excellent picture there Brian.

brian daley
02-18-2011, 12:14 AM
This is another study from Glyn L.Evans book on Kenneth Shoesmith. It shows the Royal Mail steamer Cardiganshire embarking troops at the Dardenelles while under fire from Turkish shore battery's. Shoesmith actually sketched this while he was on the Magdelena which was anchored nearby. The ships were part of an evacuation fleet which was withdrawing British and Empire troops, plus French troops too,from the disastrous ,long drawn out,Dardenelles campaign. Shoesmith was transferred to the Cardiganshire in November 1917,
BrianD



18852

captain kong
02-18-2011, 12:55 AM
Another Excellent picture there Brian.

brian daley
02-20-2011, 04:44 PM
The Lightning

This ship was built in America for a young Liverpudlian called James Baines,he was the son of a widow who kept a small sweetshop in the town. Baines was making a name for himself among the hard headed businessmen of Merseyside as someone who could spot business trends and when the Californian Gold Rush began,he was quick to capitalise the situation.He obtained sufficient backing to buy a vessel which had been built in British North America and sent over to Britain for cheap sale and on long credit. With her he did enough business to buy the famous Marco Polo and to start the Black Ball Line- not to be confused with the Black Ball Line of clipper packets that ran across the Atlantic,and with which Baines had no connection.
He sought a ship to exploit the Australian trade and engaged Donald Mackay,the most famous Scottish American shipbuilder, to design and build a ship that was both large and fast. This was the first ever order placed by a Briton in an American yard since the War of Independence. Mackay was spurred on by that fact to produce a vessel that would be a record breaker. She was launched in 1854 and her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Melbourne broke all existing records.She was registered as having 1,468 tons,244 length,44feet beam and 23 depth.For over ten years Lightning served succesfully- almost without a break- the Melbourne -Liverpool route. In 1869 she was destroyed by fire..
The painting is unattributed ,but none the worse for that,
BrianD
18861

GeorgePorgie
02-20-2011, 04:53 PM
There ya go gentlemen,even woman can paint ships :) courtesy of squashedtoad on WC....

brian daley
02-21-2011, 12:04 AM
Hi George,
that is a very good painting,it conveys a sense of place and all seems to be of correct proportions. Who is the artist and where is the place? It is a picture that I would hang on my wall,thanks.
BianD

GeorgePorgie
02-21-2011, 12:18 AM
How do,Brian

Vancouver BC.

http://squashedtoad.blogspot.com/

brian daley
02-23-2011, 01:15 AM
This is a Charles Dixon study of the Great Eastern,it is actually titled "The Great Eastern leaving the River Mersey" but I cannot recognise any parts of the river as being the Mersey. The lighters/barges were never seen on the river in my time,nor can I see whether we are looking north or south. I know that this once great ship became an advertising hulk for Lewis's department store;this painting was not dated clearly and I wondered if any of you Mersey watchers can spot anything that might give a clue to her position,
BrianD


18873

captain kong
02-23-2011, 04:41 PM
She is leaving Liverpool outward bound and has just left the new Stage. built and opened in June 1847, the Great Eastern was built in 1858, so the Stage was there. So that must be the entrance to Clarence or Trafalgar docks. or somewhere.

brian daley
02-24-2011, 01:22 AM
This is another Shoesmith classic from Glyn L. Evans book.
We are looking at a Royal Mail "A" Class ship heading west with a "bone" in her teeth.The sea is like glass, and an almost cloudless sky is being tinted with dawns early light. It looks like this could be the Alcantara ,a ship in which my late great uncle Joe was a quartermaster.
BrianD
18883

brian daley
02-25-2011, 12:47 AM
This is the ex Den of Airlie,built for Barrie and Nairn in 1913,she was one of two ships sold to Cunard in 1916,She was renamed Valeria and survived two attacks by U-boats only to run aground on Taylors Bank in the Mersey on the 21st of March 1918 as she approached the end of a passage from New York with a general cargo for Liverpool. She later caught
fire and became a total loss,
BrianD
The painting is unattributed



18885

brian daley
02-25-2011, 11:49 PM
The Majestic class of battleship was the very embodiment of late Victorian power,the flagship of the old queens navy,and guardian of her empire. She was built in 1898,the first of nine,the largest class of steel battleships ever built,armed with four 12 inch guns and 12 to 16 secondary six inch guns.The buff ,white and black livery was inherited from the mid-Victorian ironclads such as Warrior.It was thought at that time that conspicuous displays of power maintained peace ,and supported the expanding wealth of Empire based on trade,capital and investment.
Premier Gladstones political career was ended by the decision to build up the naval strength and ushered in an era of naval arms races.
Majestic met her doom off the Gallipoli beachhead when she was sunk by a threat unimagined when she was conceived two decades before,a torpedo from a U-Boat.
BrianD
This picture is from the National Maritime Museum and was executed by Eduardo de Martino in 1898


18889

captain kong
02-26-2011, 10:02 AM
What a magnificent Navy we had in those days.
There are more ships in that painting than we have in the entire navy today.

Off to the Pacific Islands Monday. Hawaii, Tahiti ,Rarotonga etc, etc. Hoping to get aboard the CARRIER, USS MIDWAY when we are in San Diego for a few days also the old British Sailing Ship `STAR OF INDIA`. Also having four days on the old QUEEN MARY in Long Beach, so I will get some good photos. back in April.
Cheers
Brian.

Oudeis
02-26-2011, 10:10 AM
What a magnificent Navy we had in those days.
There are more ships in that painting than we have in the entire navy today.

Off to the Pacific Islands Monday. Hawaii, Tahiti ,Rarotonga etc, etc. Hoping to get aboard the CARRIER, USS MIDWAY when we are in San Diego for a few days also the old British Sailing Ship `STAR OF INDIA`. so I will get some good photos. back in April.
Cheers
Brian.

"Endeavour to persevere" CK. You poor thing. Have yourself a good trip, pleasant weather and lots of pics. :)

brian daley
02-26-2011, 02:44 PM
Cap'n Kong
I hope you and Anne have a wonderful time,bring us back a coconut,
BrianD

captain kong
02-26-2011, 03:02 PM
iA ORANA E TE MAU HOPA, EAHA TO ORUA HURU.
just practicing my Tahitian.
Murururu, Thanks for that Brian, as long as I dont bring anything else back like the old days.
I am going to meet up with some of my old mates in Tahiti and Moorea,
Stan, Tico,, Rico, Eline.
Matahiti api

Cheers.
Brian.

captain kong
02-27-2011, 02:01 PM
brian daley
Cap'n Kong
I hope you and Anne have a wonderful time,bring us back a coconut,BrianD


Hi Brian,
Here is the Coconut from my friend Eline in Tahiti
Cheers .Brian,
Off tomorrow, Monday. back in six weeks.

brian daley
02-27-2011, 04:50 PM
Hi Brian,
looks scrumptious,coconut looks good as well,
Via con Dios amigo's
BrianD

captain kong
02-27-2011, 06:26 PM
She sure does look good Brian
Be with her in a couple of weeks.
Back in six weeks
Sayonara.
Brian.

GeorgePorgie
02-27-2011, 07:10 PM
Powerful one here for ya,chaps...painter is Charles Hoguet.

brian daley
02-27-2011, 09:28 PM
Very good painting George, is there any story attached? Keep 'em coming mate,
BrianD

GeorgePorgie
02-27-2011, 10:21 PM
another

brian daley
02-28-2011, 01:11 AM
You're teasing us now Georgie,posting goodies and not telling us the stories. We can see she is an East Indiaman and she is entering Madras harbour,but who is she and why has she still got her studding sails up? Anyways, I'm posting another one of Kenneth Shoesmiths studies.
This is the Royal Mail Line Steamer "Thames" on which Shoesmith served as an apprentice in 1911. According to Glyn L. Evans, "Her design with clipper bow and counter stern and raked twin funnels, gave her the appearance of a large private yacht" The ship looks to be in one of the West Indian ports and a Lamport & Holt liner is shown anchored nearby. This angle of view seems to find favour with the artist as he completed many of his ship portraits in a similar manner,
[ATTACH=CONFIG]18937[/ATTACHBrianD

captain kong
02-28-2011, 09:55 AM
Shoesmith was a Mate with Cunard. He has some paintings on the old Queen Mary in Long Beach, He has the Madona of the Sea [ or ships] on board so I will be there Tuesday night and try and take a photio.
Cheers
Brian off on my trip to the South Seas in a couple of hours. Back in six weeks.

brian daley
02-28-2011, 10:43 AM
May you have fair winds,silken seas,blue skies and star filled nights,
BrianD

GeorgePorgie
02-28-2011, 01:55 PM
and

brian daley
02-28-2011, 09:04 PM
Georgie,
Another lovely seascape, Painted by Hermanus Koekkoek,a 17th century marine artist,it shows a little schuyt vittling the tall ship in the middle distance. Most probably on the Zuyder Zee.
I have posted another Thames scene,this one is from the Royal Exchange Art Gallery and is a work by one of the foremost riverine artists,William Lionel Wylie. A greatly experienced yachtsman,Wylie spent many years on the Thames and painted very many pictures of the traffic that plied that waterway,this is entitled "The Thames at Sunset" and manages to make that murky old river look beautiful,hope you like it ,
BrianD
18940

brian daley
03-01-2011, 11:25 PM
This is the vessel that gave her name to the Americas Cup. She was designed by George Steers for John C.Stevens,the Commodore of the New York Yacht Club ,and built 1851 in New York with the express purpose of taking on Britain's formidable Royal Yacht Squadron.
America made her first transatlantic voyage in the summer of 1851 and Stevens entered her in the 53 mile race around the Isle of Wight in August,Queen Victoria was in attendance.When America crossed the finishing line, her lead was so great that the Queen asked for the name of the vessel in second place. She received the legendary reply "Your Majesty, there is no second" From then on the trophy that Stevens won has been known as The Americas Cup, the most prestigious prize in the yachting world.
The portrait was painted by the artist John Fraser and hangs in the National Maritime Museum,
BrianD
18946

brian daley
03-03-2011, 11:52 PM
Liverpool had over 20,000 seamen who were employed on the ships that sailed out of this port,a further 10,000 seamen from beyond Merseyside were registered with the pool. Captain Kong and I were discussing this fact just before he departed for his 6 week tour of the Pacific.What we both could not understand was that out of those many thousand why were so few ever seen on this site. It would seem that Old Kong and I are the only ones who regularly contribute;sometimes we hear from Malcolm (Samsette) and occassionally Ernie pops in.We wondered whatever happened to the rest of those old salts,do we bore them?
Well ,back to business, this study is by a contemporary British marine artist ,Malcolm Myers,a Cornishman born in 1954,he is world famous for his seascapes and historical studies.This work is entitled "Sir Edward Hawkes Fleet at Spithead",a beautifully detailed study,
BrianD18957

brian daley
03-06-2011, 12:28 AM
Another superb Shoesmith study from Glyn L. Evans book.
Here we can see the Royal Mail Liner Trent in her Admiralty livery,built in 1899 for Royal Mails South American service ,she was conscripted into the Royal Navy in 1915.She served as a depot ship to the Monitors HMS Severn and HMS Mersey ,on their mission to destroy the German light cruiser Konigsberg,which lay trappedby a Royal Naval blockade in the shallow waters of the Rufiji Delta on the East African coast. The story of the voyage the shallow draft monitors made from Brazil to Africas East Coast was epic and is worth looking up. The Trent reverted to Royal Mail Line service after WW1 and was sold for scrap in 1922.
BrianD

ATTACH=CONFIG]18981[/ATTACH]

Oudeis
03-06-2011, 11:23 AM
This from The New York Times. [full article for download from the site]

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F40E10FB3F5A17738DDDAE0994DD405B 888CF1D3

BUBONIC PLAGUE CAN'T REACH HERE; Royal Mail Line Surgeon Says There Is Little Danger of an Outbreak. LA GUAYRA IS ISOLATED He Thinks the Malady Is More Likely to be Communicated from Black Sea Ports. $4,000 Job for John G. Burnet.
[ DISPLAYING ABSTRACT ]
In the opinion of Dr. William J. Waymark, surgeon of the Royal Mail liner Trent, which sailed for the West Indies and Panama yesterday, there is a greater risk of the bubonic plague being communicated to the United States from Eastern Russia and Asia Minor than there is from Venezuela, where the scourge has been epidemic in the port of La Guayra.

---------- Post added at 10:11 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:07 AM ----------

It can be a stormy passage, this ship line lark...

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/royalmail.html

---------- Post added at 10:23 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:11 AM ----------

I have had a look at this as HTML, the Trent is on page 8. Plenty of technical detail: she has 15 kts (whatever that may be?) and was 'dressed' in black at the time of her rescuing post earthquake souls from Jamaica.

www.sdmaritime.org/assets/Uploads/Newsletters/iEuterpeTimesV4No48.pdf

az_gila
03-06-2011, 04:05 PM
[/COLOR]I have had a look at this as HTML, the Trent is on page 8. Plenty of technical detail: she has 15 kts (whatever that may be?) and was 'dressed' in black at the time of her rescuing post earthquake souls from Jamaica.

www.sdmaritime.org/assets/Uploads/Newsletters/iEuterpeTimesV4No48.pdf (http://www.sdmaritime.org/assets/Uploads/Newsletters/iEuterpeTimesV4No48.pdf)

From page 8 of the pdf file, it sounds like they were just comparing the black hull colour to the mourning clothes of the Jamaicans.

Thanks for the newsletter link. My son crewed on the Lady Washington (page 7) and
Hawaiian for several years. The original Lady Washington was tender for the Columbia - whose replica lots of people have seen at Disneyland...:)

Oudeis
03-06-2011, 05:01 PM
From page 8 of the pdf file, it sounds like they were just comparing the black hull colour to the mourning clothes of the Jamaicans.

Thanks for the newsletter link. My son crewed on the Lady Washington (page 7) and
Hawaiian for several years. The original Lady Washington was tender for the Columbia - whose replica lots of people have seen at Disneyland...:)

Very true, but Brian's picture and his text shows and speaks of, "the Royal Mail Liner Trent in her Admiralty livery".
P.S.
I came across mentions of previous 'Trents', one which played a part in the American civil war which is something that crops up here from time to time too.

brian daley
03-06-2011, 07:00 PM
Hi Oudeis and Az,
I left a lot of details out of theTrents biog. she was only dressed in grey for 4 short years during her Admiralty service. She normally had buff coloured funnels ,white upperworks and a black hull. The 15 knots refers to her maximum speed.
Other things mentioned in the biog.are her running aground in 1909, off the coast of Colombia,another RMSP liner,the Magdalena,was despatched to help tow her off.Cargo was jettisoned,but to no avail .She was divested of stores,furniture and movable fittings,she was then refloated and sailed to Southampton for repairs.
In 1910,while on the New York -Bermuda run,she helped rescue the survivors of the Wellman aiirship America,which was attempting to make the first crossing of the Atlantic by air. The rescue took place in the hours of darkness,when they ropped to the water in their lifeboat;the Trent picked them up and landed them in New York.A couple of tales to tickle ones curiosity!
Az, I was pleased to read of your sons service on the Lady Washington,was he in the Mercantile Marine? Do you have any more mariners in the family? just interested,that's all,
BrianD

az_gila
03-06-2011, 11:51 PM
....
Az, I was pleased to read of your sons service on the Lady Washington,was he in the Mercantile Marine? Do you have any more mariners in the family? just interested,that's all,
BrianD

Brian,

Not in the merchant marine... he had a spell of about 7-8 years where he volunteered as crew on tall ships.

It started off with this one in Erie, PA

http://flagshipniagara.org/flagship_niagara/index.htm and after a few seasons was it's cook.

The highlight was the brig being in the lead group at the Presidential July 4th 2000 review in NY harbour. This article describes it a bit and give the history of the brig from the war of 1812 -

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE0D71F30F933A05755C0A9669C8B 63&pagewanted=all

Spread to a few others, one taking kids in San Fransisco and two seasons on the Hiawain Chieftain/Lady Washington that cruise together on the US West coast.

Sailing with kids he discovered that haviing them quickly identify the downwind railing was very important...:)

I went on a "battle cruise" out of Marina del Rey on the Lady Washington and it was a kick - shooting cannons at each other in the Pacific while dodging the idiots in power boats who sail as badly as they drive on the LA freeways....:)

I was very impressed with the crew running up and down the rigging working on the sails - it's a long way up there!

He since settled down and now owns/runs a game shop in Santa Monica.

The other sailors in the family were my grandfather who was a captain for the Palm Lines before WWII, and my uncle, who I just found out was a wireless operator on HMS Inman in WWII, a Captain Class frigate (Destroyer Escort) built in Boston under Lend Lease. After the war is was immeadiately scrapped. It performed North Atlantic convoy escort duties.

18987

brian daley
03-07-2011, 12:47 AM
18988Hi Az, thanks for that very interesting bit of reading. Your son seem like a very well put together young man,and your granddad would'nt no slouch,rising to the office of master. I saw a movie just this weekend about a Lease Lend four stacker,"HMS Gift Horse" it was called ,and it was a bloody good yarn
Staying on the Atlantic,tonights posting is one of the best known ship portraits of all time. This is RMS Queen Mary,painted by the Marine Artist Sibley. The picture was executed in 1936,at the time of her first voyage to New York,during which she won the Blue Riband and broke six Atlantic Speed records. A print of this painting hung in the hall of our proimary school in Tiber Street over 60 years ago ,I came across it in an old magazine tonight,called Shipping Wonders of the World,it was printed in 1937.
BrianD

az_gila
03-07-2011, 01:39 AM
Brian... thanks for the comments.

In checking the history of the lend Lease Captain class frigates, it seems that you are close to the UK memorial site...

On April 17, 2005 a memorial to the Captains, those that served, and those killed in action in them was dedicated at the National Memorial Arboretum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Memorial_Arboretum) near Alrewas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alrewas), Staffordshire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staffordshire).

Introduction to the Order of Service from the memorial dedication April 17, 2005 Today we come in thanksgiving for all who served on Captain Class Frigates in the Royal Navy in the Second World War.
In particular we give thanks to those who made the supreme sacrifice on behalf of us all.
We remember all those who were shore-based, especially the Wrens who gave valuable support to those who served at sea, and who are represented here today.

I'm always amazed at how much was produced in such a short time during WWII....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_class_frigate

78 of these frigates in just two years, along with all of the other ship building going on.

When I asked my uncle about where they sailed, he said he didn't really know, wartime secrecy extended to the crew, but he did say they went pretty far North in their crossing of the Atantic with the convoys.

brian daley
03-07-2011, 11:01 AM
Hi Az,
The Gift Horse(USS Whittier) was one of the ships mentioned below,old ,decommissioned four stackers that the US gave to Britain in exchange for bases in the Bahamas. I've cut and pasted the item below ,which was on an American website. A lot of people have forgotten this deal,or are too young to know about it,but those old scows helped Britain ,and Canada,to give some protection to mechant ships in convoys, against the U-Boat attacks. When the Lease Lend Act got properly underway Britain was enabled to arm itelf adequately until America entered the war.
I often visit the National War Memorial in Alrewas, it is a poignant place and has a quite peaceful atmosphere,it does not celebrate wars,it remembers and honours those who died in them.

" As soon as WWII started in Europe President Roosevelt wanted to help Britain and France win the war, but most Americans and Congress were against getting the USin a war in Europe. Roosevelt did what he could to convince Americans of the dangerof letting Nazi Germany win, such as giving numerous speeches against Hitler. Eventually Congress agreed to sell arms to Britain only if Britain paid in cash and picked up the goods in British ships. But the unprotected ships were being sunk by German submarines. So Roosevelt got Congress to agree to give Britain 50 old destroyers in exchangefor leasesof naval bases in the Atlantic. Then Britain ran out of cash, so Roosevelt came up with the Lend-Lease Act - Britain would borrow arms and materials and return them at the end of the war, and America would provide escort up to the middle of the Atlantic. When American warships ran into German submarines, Roosevelt ordered them to shoot on sight. Despite the various provocations Hitler ordered German submarines not to engage US warships since he did not want to give Roosevelt an excuse to declare war on Germany. Nonetheless accidents did happen and a couple US warships were attacked and sunk.For all practical purposes the US and German navies were in a shooting war in the Atlantic, but that wasn't enough to get an official war going between Germany and the US. Then on December 6, 1941 Japan attacked the US and America declared war on Japan. Japan was an ally of Germany, but Germany was under no obligation to go to war with Japan. Yet Hitler declared war on the US on December 10. People are still not sure why Hitler did what he did."

brian daley
03-08-2011, 08:54 PM
Hi Az,
I knew I had a print of the ship that gift horse was based on. Itwas the HMS Cambpelltown,an American WW1 "four piper" that was transferred in the aformentioned deal. She was altered greatly for the St Nazaire Raid,shorn of two funnels and her superstructure altered to give her the appearance of a German destroyer. She was cleaned out below decks and had 5 tons of high explosive concreted into her hull.She is shown here making a dash for the all important lock gates,which she rammed ,the explosives were on a time charge and she blew up after all the crew had left her.There were very many allied casualties,both British and Canadian and the ramming had no real effect on the course of the war. In 1962 I worked with one of the commando's who had been on the raid and he stated that their German captors treated the wounded survivors brutally.
The painting was the work of that great war artist Norman Wilkinson;I had to lose a third of it because the print was too big for my scanner,
BrianD

18995

brian daley
03-09-2011, 12:52 AM
This is another lively study by Mark Myers, this one marks the occasion that the British Admiral Sir Sidney Dacres paid a courtesy visit to Cherbourg.His squadron consisted of the ironclads Achilles,Black Prince,Hector,Roal Sovereign and Dewfewnce,and the wooden screw ships Edgar ,Liverpool,Octavia and Constance. They were met by by the French flagship Magenta,seen here firing a salute as the British ships enter the harbour. This visit was used by both navies to showcase their latest vessels as there was a very definite arms race on at the time,
BrianD





18996

brian daley
03-09-2011, 11:23 PM
This is a painting by another great British marine artist,Frank H.Mason. This work is of the the battle on the Rufiji River ,when the Monitor vessels Severn and Mersey engaged the German battle cruiser Konigsberg.(see picture by Kenneth Shoesmith of same incident)
Like Shoesmith and Dixon,Mason had an abiding love of ships and the sea ,also like Shoesmith,he served as an engineer officer, and served in WW1 as a Lieutenant in the RNVR. He had a very succesful career and painted ships of all sizes and calling,he died aged 78 in 1965,
BrianD







ATTACH=CONFIG]19011[/ATTACH]

brian daley
03-13-2011, 01:17 AM
Here is another ship portrait from Glyn L.Evans book on Kenneth D.Shoesmith,here he has painted an unamed ship which is dressed in dazzle,a method of camouflage developed for the Admiralty during WW1.
Another artist,Norman Wilkinson came up with the idea of "dazzling" ships because it made them almost unidentifiable when at sea. Here, the ship is shown at anchor in the harbour at New Orleans,although most sailors would say it was a quayside port ,being on a river and havcing no enclosed moorings. Why Dazzle was not used in WW2 I cannot say,could it have been the expense?
BrianD







19022

wsteve55
03-13-2011, 01:19 AM
Took these pic's the other week,of the Fort George,in Canada dock. I presume she was just docked there,but there have been a few navy ships dismantled,nearby,recently! Hope she doesn't end up as scrap! I'm probably wrong,but didn't she serve in the Falklands war?

brian daley
03-15-2011, 06:15 PM
Another ship portrait from Glyn L. Evans book of Kenneth D.Shoesmith, the ship depicted here has been torpdoed and ,mercifully ,did not sink. She is shown being towed to safety by two steam tugs.
The ship looks like the Royal Mail steamhip Demerara,Shoesmith was sailing with RMSP at the time and may have witnessed this rescue in May 1915. The Demara sailed on until 1933 when she was sold to a Japanese scrapyard. The U-Boat that attacked her was rammed ,and sunk, by a Royal Navy patrol boat in 1918,
BrianD

Oudeis
03-15-2011, 07:18 PM
Dazzle?
There must have been a great deal of head-scratching back in those days. What with an invisible ship and a thick column of dark smoke rising as if from nowhere. ;)

brian daley
03-16-2011, 12:04 AM
I think they were all dropping acid,
BrianD

wsteve55
03-18-2011, 12:59 PM
That's a great pic' there,Brian!

ItsaZappathing
03-18-2011, 02:09 PM
I think they were all dropping acid,
BrianD

Haha.:PDT11

brian daley
03-18-2011, 10:46 PM
1910919108

In Tonight's posting we have two photographs,both having the HMS Vamguard almost centre frame. In the first photograph we have the Royal Yacht cruising down past the naval dockyards, the Vanguard is moored alongside , and in the dockyard we can see Britains most famous warship,HMS Victory. It is noticeable that all three ships are dressed up for some kind of celebration. The second picture shows Vanguard grounded at the Point,in Old Portsmouth. Her sleek lines show that she was of a newer generation of battleship, she was the equal of anything afloat but did not see service until WW2 was ended. Her greatest moment came when she carried the Royal Family to South Africa in 1947.
The grounding incident happened as she made her way to the breakers,a sad end for a great,untested, ship,
BrianD

Sailor
03-19-2011, 10:06 AM
Took these pic's the other week,of the Fort George,in Canada dock. I presume she was just docked there,but there have been a few navy ships dismantled,nearby,recently! Hope she doesn't end up as scrap! I'm probably wrong,but didn't she serve in the Falklands war?

The Fort George isn't an Aussie ship my mate, she's British.

She's an RFA (Royal Fleet Auxiliary).

Basically a ship ran by the MOD and crewed by British Merchant Seamen to supply ships from British and other Navies with fuel, stores and ammunition whilst underway at sea.

It wasn't the Fort George who fought down South but the Fort Grange (Since renamed Fort Rosalie and still going strong).

Yes, she's for the knackers yard mate. Another victim of the UK's defence cuts.

Here you go:

RFA Fort George arriving at Liverpool for lay up and disposal.

"Built by Swan Hunters on the Tyne and completed in 1994 she is the largest vessel in the Royal Fleet Auxiliary to be de-commissioned under the latest defence cuts in the UK. Designed to part of a 12 ship class only two were built the other being RFA Fort Victoria. The idea behind them was that they would be a “one stop” ship able to supply fuel oils, dry stores, and fresh water; in addition they have extensive helicopter maintenance facilities. They were also fitted for, but not with, the Sea Wolf air defence system for self defence.

Whist the older units of the RFA fleet are being refurbished the relatively young Fort George has several drawbacks including her relatively high manning and running costs and because she has only a single hull in the way of her replenishment oil tanks thus rendering her, technically, unable to carry fuel oil which is used to replenish warships at sea. Although he ships have been given and exemption from these requirements for the time being however, this runs out in 2016 when all tankers without exception, will have to be of double hull construction.

What is to become of her now is unclear, under normal circumstances she still has plenty of life left in her. Perhaps she will be used to supply spare parts to her sister ship Fort Victoria, or she may be sold to a less fastidious navy were such petty restrictions are of little consequence – time will tell."

http://www.demotix.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/large_652x488_scaled/photos/RFA-Fort-George-arrives-Decommissioning-Liverpool_626071.jpg

A sad day.

wsteve55
03-19-2011, 01:00 PM
Hi Sailor,
I did realise she was a U.K. vessel,but my terminology was wrong! In the absence of any I.D., I guessed that "Her Majesty's Auxiliary Ship" would fit,but didn't realise this would convert her to an Oz!:unibrow: Thanks for the info',but sad that she is for the chop,or sale,but you can only assume that they know what they are doing??

Sailor
03-21-2011, 01:26 PM
The R.F.A:

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/2010%20South%20Atlantic/SGTripMarch20103182.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/2010%20South%20Atlantic/150310239.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/2010%20South%20Atlantic/RASwithHMSYorkApril201033.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/2010%20South%20Atlantic/RASwithHMSYorkApril201026.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/2010%20South%20Atlantic/RASwithWaveKnight4-2-10.jpg

Both of these lovely vessels are currently on their way home to be scrapped...Via helping out the Libyan people.

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/BayleafRASingCumberlandPersianGulfJanuary2011.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/BayleafRASingCumberlandPersianGulfJanuary20115.jpg

They RAS (Replenishment At Sea) Yanks and other countries ships as well.

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/BayleafRASingUSSPaulHamilton20thJan201119.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/P1010095.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/P1010101.jpg

http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z40/Toffeeboy_photos/Bayleaf%20%20Persian%20Gulf%202010-11/P1010266.jpg

The RFA: "Ready For Anything."

az_gila
03-21-2011, 04:18 PM
What does the orange dummy in the next to last picture do?

Is he a mascot, target practice or for man overboard training?....:)

Sailor
03-21-2011, 06:50 PM
He plays up front for Liverpool. Someone's cut his pony-tail off.



Used for man-overboard drills mate.

wsteve55
03-21-2011, 11:20 PM
Great pic's Sailor! :nod:

brian daley
03-23-2011, 10:14 PM
This pre-dreadnought battleship was built in 1899 for the Imperial German Navy ,and to fulfil the dreams of Kaiser Wilhelm11 and Admiral Tirpitz,triggering a naval arms race between the great European powers. The Wittelsbach class were designed to fight in the North Sea,somewhere between Heligoland and the Thames Estuary. For a short while they were the acme of German Naval power,and then the British introduced the Dreadnought. This rendered these ships obsolete and the W class spent WW1 in port never firing a shot in anger .
This painting was done by Carl Saltzmann in 1900 and now hangs in the National Maritime Museum ,London,
BrianD
19169

brian daley
03-25-2011, 11:51 PM
This is another ship portrait by Kenneth D.Shoesmith.It is the Essequibo, she was built for the Royal Mail Line in 1915, and was swiftly commissioned by the Admiralty as a hospital ship ,a position she served in for the entire duration of the war. In 1917 she was stopped by a U-boat ,which sent a crew aboard her to ascertain she was indeed a hospital ship. She was allowed to proceed and reverted to the Royal Mail in 1919. She continued to on the South American service until she was sold to the Russians in 1935. Once again we have to thank Glyn L. Evans for putting together such a wonderful collection,
BrianD


19182

Oudeis
03-26-2011, 01:02 AM
Burials at sea. I dare say that in peacetime these rites are a thing of the past. Is there a central list or are these just noted ship by ship?

brian daley
03-27-2011, 11:49 PM
The Gjoa
The famed Norwegian Polar explorer Roald Amundsen was in command of this sturdy little vessel as he made the first transit of the notorious Northwest Passage. His voyage began in June 1903 and they spent two years taking magnetic observations in Lancaster Sound and King Edward Island. By August 1905 they were free of ice and continued west along continental Canada and wintered in off King Point in Alaska. He then made an overland trek on skis to the nearest setlement ,which was 500 hundred miles away. There, Eagle, he was able to telegraph the world of his great success. Amundsen then sailed her down to San Francisco ,where she remained until 1974 when she was fully restored to seaworthiness and sailed back to Oslo ,where she is housed in the National Maritime Museum.
The portait is by Lauritz Haaland.
BrianD




19193

az_gila
03-28-2011, 01:02 AM
Burials at sea. I dare say that in peacetime these rites are a thing of the past. Is there a central list or are these just noted ship by ship?

Maybe for a true burial at sea, but scattering ashes in the Pacific is common...

http://www.ashesonthesea.com/who-we-are/tour-our-grounds
http://www.neptunesburialsatsea.com/

The service we went to was several miles off the Los Angeles harbor entrance and was very moving. The ship (100 passenger size) sailed in circles calming a small portion of the Pacific within the circle. The ashes were scattered in the calm area, spreading out slowly, and the mourners all threw flowers into the circle.

Oudeis
03-28-2011, 04:30 PM
That all sounds well organised and a far nicer send-off.

[the burial at sea question is because I have only just noticed on a head-stone I pass every day that the woman interred has had her children commemorated thereon also. Among those was her tenth son who died at and was buried at sea on his return from India in 1865. Her fourth son and fourth daughter are also mentioned]
P.S.
I read a young woman from Chester has gone missing from a Disney cruise ship, on which she worked, that has just returned to San Francisco.

brian daley
03-29-2011, 11:58 PM
In 1885 Queen Victoria celebrated her golden jubilee with a suitably impressive Naval Review at Spithead, and amidst a fleet ofsample vessels that contained every type of warship since Warrior,the brand new battleship Edinburgh offered both a glimpse of the future,and a last hurrah for a lost age. She combined three major firsts for a British battleship;the first to use steel for the hull,the first with heavy breech loaders,in this case 12 inch rifled guns,and the first use of compound,rather than simple wrought iron armour.
However her low freeboard and en echelonarrangement for her two heavy turrets was utterly useless for naval combat.Her true functionwas coastal bombardment. While her new technologies would revolutionise warships,her design was a dead end,
BrianD
This painting was the work of Eduardo de Martino c1887 and hangs in the National Maritime Museum19207

brian daley
03-30-2011, 11:42 PM
This was the warship which changed naval design for battleships in navies the world over. It was the brainchild of British admiral Jackie Fisher, the advances in naval technology were so profound all subsequent ships were known "dreadnoughts" and earlier battleships as "pre-dreadnoughts." Her building caused a major surge in the arms race between the great powers, leading to each major navy building their own "dreadnoughts" to maintain the balance of power. You may note that the postcard is German, they made the building of like warships their greatest priority.






19217

Oudeis
04-04-2011, 11:07 AM
By the by...

The Highland Monarch sailed from Buenos Aires bound for the UK in 1956. So I read in a roundabout way. On the voyage two crewmen were operated on for appendicitis, the first to be operated on was/is a very lucky man, so I read.
Just thought I'd share.

[I hope you are feeling better Brian. Where is Kong with his tsunami tales?]

brian daley
04-07-2011, 05:05 PM
Hi Oudeis,
I'm still crook,had to have an operation postponed on Wednesday because my boilers are not working properlyn Anyone out there got a lung to spare?
In your last post you mentioned seamen being operated on for appendicitis while at sea. I heard some dire tales of some men who developed peritonitis and then dying because of insufficient medical skills. I was lucky,I had mine taken out by mistake when I was in Lisbon ( I wrote about it in Hullo Old Home)
Well Spring is now upon us and it is time for sorting out the summer vacation, cruising is now the number one growth area you are spoilt for choice,but beware of the cruises at the lower end of the price scale,you might end up on something like this............................

19296.
BrianD

Oudeis
04-07-2011, 09:14 PM
I'll get back to you Brian, I am a bit "tired & emotional" at the moment. :)
All the best with your dry-docking.

brian daley
04-11-2011, 11:28 PM
This is another wonderful Thameside study by Charles Dixon,sadly there was no information other than the ships name and where she was anchored.Old Kong will be the first to notice what seems to be an anomaly. She is British and is flying the blue ensign at her stern, however she is flying the Stars and Stripes on her aftermast and the Union flag on her mizzen,whilst the Red Cross is in its rightful place on the foremast . What could be the reason for the flag array?
BrianD



19356

Oudeis
04-12-2011, 05:45 PM
Brian(s) I wonder if this would take your mind from your troubles...

http://shipfinder.co/

---------- Post added at 04:45 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:24 PM ----------

Happy to report that the zoom-in feature has a great deal going for it. :)

captain kong
04-12-2011, 06:08 PM
Since 1900 all RFA hospital ships had been called Maine. Maybe she had American patients on board.

brian daley
04-14-2011, 12:17 AM
Kenneth D. Shoesmith,being a mariner himself, was more than familiar with the lines and angles of a ship, he did many study's stern on which seemed to draw the viewer into the picture. In this picture he portrays the Royal yacht,Victoria & Albert off the Isle of Wight for Cowes week,this was done for Royal Mail calender sometime in the '20's
BrianD


19370

captain kong
04-15-2011, 05:36 PM
I saw the Royal Yacht V&A at Whale Island, near Portsmouth, when I was on a gunnery course there. in 1950 she was laid up and awaiting scrapping.
K Shoesmith was a Chief Officer with Cunard.
When I was on the QUEEN MARY LAST week I found a room with a few of his paintings, when I get my photo card bak I will post them.

Oudeis
04-15-2011, 11:28 PM
http://www.tvguide.co.uk/detail.asp?id=90667127

---------- Post added at 10:28 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:25 PM ----------

I caught a little of the above programme tonight regarding the sinking of The Empress of Ireland in 1914. Lots of technical seafaring stuff. I note the programme is to be re-shown tomorrow, as the link will explain.

brian daley
04-16-2011, 12:17 AM
This is another classic Kenneth D. Shoesmith portrait,again it is of the Royal Yacht Victoria and Albert,but this time it was not for a company brochure but to commemorate a special occassion. The Victoria and Albert was carrying their majesties King George V and Queen Mary from Holyhead to Belfast for the opening of the First Session of the Parliament of Northern Ireland in June 1921. The yacht is pictured passing the Harland and Wolff shipyard and we can see in the distance the proud dome of Belfast town hall.


TTACH=CONFIG]20665[/ATTACH]
BrianD

brian daley
04-18-2011, 12:13 AM
This study is simply titled "Wartime Traffic on the Thames",the painting is far from simple.The artist,John Platt,has evoked a scene that took place during the bombing of Surrey Commercial Docks.We can see the warehouses in the background still smouldering from the previous nights bombing and the reddish light illuminating the river and vessels is from the blazes that are still burning from this evenings blitz, We can see the naval vessels heading upstream towards the inferno ,whilst the barges and lighters are fleeing the flames.You will note that the MTB has its mast lowered so that she can negotiate the low bridges on the upper Thames,
BrianD






ATTACH=CONFIG]20676[/ATTACH]

Oudeis
04-19-2011, 02:55 PM
Rather belatedly the news comes, via his obituary, of the death of Douglas Faulkner. He being the technical brains behind the inquiry into the sinking of the MV Derbyshire...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/apr/15/douglas-faulkner-obituary

brian daley
04-20-2011, 12:37 AM
The Gannet

This vessel was built in1879 and is a product of the transition from sail to steam, She was classified by the Royal Navy as a sloop,and was designed to police the trade routes and colonies of the rapidly expanding British Empire. Having both forms of propulsion meant that she could cruise independently in the remote parts of the Pacific,Indian and South Atlantic Oceans,where coaling stations were few and far between.
The Victorian expression "Send a Gunboat" led to Gannet seeing action in many "hot spots" as well as carrying out anti slavery patrols in the Red Sea. Her operational life ended in 1895 and she survived as static sea training school on the Hamble. She is now fully restored to her orginal finery and is shown here at Chatham Dockyard. The large housings in the background were where the Navy built and maintained her wooden walls and are well worth a visit.
BrianD






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brian daley
04-26-2011, 12:46 AM
Here are two posters that were designed by Kenneth D. Shoesmith for the grandly named Empire Marketing Board,an organisation that was created for the fostering of trade within the British Empire. It was set up in 1926 and abolished in 1936,and within that short time span the agency used some of the leading artist's of that time to create more 700 posters that were great works of art.The first poster shows the Sinhalese wharfies in Colombo0loading cargo bound for London, while the second posters shows us the Chinese talleyman checking the bales as they are toted to the quayside in Penang,in both posters you will note that the cargo bears the logo EMB. I have a few more which I shall post here soon,
BrianD


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gregs dad
05-10-2011, 07:52 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3414/5707744388_dd09d1bef4_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/exacta2a/5707744388/)

Nordic Copenhagan,tanker built 2005, under the Danish flag used to be Singapore.
Sailing past the cruise terminal,Liverpool

captain kong
05-10-2011, 10:48 PM
Hi Brian,
I have the pictures of the Madonna of the Sea by Shoesmith. They are on the Queen Mary in Long Beach.
I have tried to post them but there is no facility to upload them.
I will try to email themm to you.
Cheers.
Brian.

brian daley
05-12-2011, 09:17 PM
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Shoesmith

Captain Kong e.mailed these Shoesmith study's to me yesterday he took whilst staying aboard the RMS Queen Mary in Longbeach, California. He found them in one of the state rooms aboard the Mary and they were painted by Kenneth D Shoesmith in the 1930's when he was commissioned by Cunard, they have been hanging in the Mary for these past 70 years (excepting for the period of World War 2). Brian, knew that I was posting pictures by Shoesmith and thought that I would like to add them to my collection. I was very pleased to do so and, indeed I was pleased to think that these pictures have given so much pleasure to the tens of thousands of people over the past half century and I like to think that they will give pleasure to all of those who will follow us in the future. I hope you like them too.
After Brian sent me the pictures I discovered the above photo of the artist himself putting the finishing touches to the picture of the "Madonna of the Atlantic"
BrianD.



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ItsaZappathing
06-05-2011, 03:52 PM
Excellent stuff all.:handclap:

wsteve55
06-06-2011, 08:20 PM
Certainly is!:nod:

Oudeis
01-08-2012, 05:55 PM
Ahoy!! Avast ye sailors all!

I will say hello and goodbye to ye. For once ye visit this 'ere site you be truely stuck fast on a whole reef of memories and dreams...

http://www.photoship.co.uk/Browse%20Misc%20Galleries/

Aaaarrr! Gid luck to ye...aaaahhrrr lol

brian daley
03-05-2012, 08:50 PM
This portrait is of the Booth Liner ANSELM,the second ship in the fleet to bear that name. She is shown making her way up the Amazon on the 1000 mile journey to Manaus. She was built by Workman ,Clark &Co. in Belfast in 1905. ANSELM served with the Booth Line until 1922 ,when she was sold to owners in Argentina ,who renamed her Commodoro Rivadavia. She was eventually broken up in 1959.

This study was the work of a Brazilian artist D.W.E.Gutman ,allof whose knowwn paintings are portraits of Booth Line ships.
BrianD
This is from the British Mercantile Memorial Collection.

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brian daley
03-07-2012, 10:35 PM
This little coaster was built in Middlesborough in 1911 for the Meteor Steamship Co. of that port; she was a very fortunate little vessel and she survived two world wars ,as well as four different Owners. She was called the Eskwood for her first owners.She was renamed Kilworth in 1946 after serving theGrand Union Shipping of London She underwent two more changes of ownership and two more renamingsbeforefinally,as late as 1956,being sold as Holdernoll to be broken up at Gateshead.

This was painted by a Danish artist H.Hangen who,presumablyhad some association with her,there are no other works known by this artist.
BrianD